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FEBRUARY 15, 1964 


Johnny Mathis continues to rank as one of the industry’s most consistent hot-selling artists. He made a potent debut under the Mercury banner with one of last year’s biggest Christmas IP’s, 
‘‘Sounds of Christmas” and in his latest LP “Tender Is The Night” could add another Gold LP to his huge collection. The album, which features a four-color reproduction of the dra- 
matic Mathis portrait seen above, is climbing the charts at a torrid clip. The vocalist is also hot in the singles field with “Bye Bye Barbara.” Johnny will work the Terrazia Casino in 
Mexico City for two weeks beginning Feb. 20th. He goes into Philly’s Latin Casino in April. The Mathis portrait for the “Tender” LP exemplifies the attractive, costly and elaborate 
packaging the record industry ofFers the consumer. 





Those “Ballad of 
Jed Clampett” Boys 
Have Another 
TV Theme Smash! 

^PETTICOAT 

JUNCTION 4*42982 

(Theme from "Petticoat Junction” 
the CBS Television Network Series) 


COLUMBIA 

SINGLES 


COLuMBtA.gMARCAS REG PRINTED IN US. 


\ 

\ 






Ca^ Box 



FOUNDED BY BILL GERSH 


Cash Box 

Vol. XXV — Number 23 February 15/ 1964 


THE HARD WAY 


WA.V.W.S %.> s i)ywM*wWw< y » y 8 tfSYWS 

Gash Box 

(Publication Office) 

1780 Broadway 
New York 19, N. Y — 10019 

(Phone: JUdson 6-2640) 

CABLE ADDRESS: CASHBOX, N. Y. 


JOE ORLEGE, President and Publisher 
NORMAN ORLECK, Vice President 
GEORGE ALBERT, Vice President 


EDITORIAL— Music 

MARTY OSTROW, Editor-in-Chief 
IRA HOWARD, E^tor 
IRV LICHTMAN, Editor 
DICK ZIMMERMAN, Editorial Assistant 
BOB ET'flNGER, Editorial Assistant 
MIKE MARTtJCCI, Editorial Assistant 
JERRY ORLECK, Editorial Assistant 

ADVERTISING 

JERRY SHIFRIN, Nat’l. Adv. Dir. of Music 
MARTY TOOHEY, Nat’l. Dir.— Coin Machine 
BOB McKEAGE, N.Y.C., Music 
LEE BROOKS, Manager, Chicago 
JACK DEVANEY, Manager, Los Angeles 
GEORGE GOLDMAN, Art Director 

ADVERTISING: INTERNATIONAL 

See List of International Representatives 
Below 

MANAGERS 

MARTY TOOHEY, Coin Machine Dept. 

T, TQRTOSA, Circulation 

Neville marten, European Director 


CHICAGO 
LEE BROOKS 

29 E. Madison St., Chicago 2, 111. 
(All Phones: Financial 0-7272) 


HOLLYWOOD 
JACK DEVANEY 
6290 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, Cal. 
(Phone Hollywood 6-2129) 


ENGLAND 
NEVILLE MARTEN 
Dorris Land 
9a New Bond St. 

London, Wl, Eng. 

Tel: Hyde Park 2868 

HOLLAND: PAUL ACKET, Theresiastraat 81a, 
The Hague, Holland, Tel: 070-722646 
GERMANY: MAL SONDOCK, Axnalienstrasse 
28, Munich, Germany, Tel: 220197 
ITALY: MARIO PANVINI ROSATI, Viale 
Legioni Romane 6 Milan, Tel: 4073963 
SCANDINAVIA: SVEN G. WINQUIST, Kagge- 
holmsvagen 48, Stockholm-Enskede, Sweden, 
Tel: 69-46-85 

FRANCE: ROGER SELLAM, 36 rue de Moscou, 
Paris, France, Tel: Laborde 8623 
AUSTRALIA: RON TUDOR, 8 Francis St., 
Heathmont, Victoria, Tel: 87-5677 
BELGIUM: FRANS ROMEYNS, 

Paul Hsmianslaan, 8, Brussels 15, Tel: 
71.67.61 

MEXICO: ENRIQUE ORTIZ, Insurgentes Sur 
1870 Mexico 20, D. F., Tel: 24-65-57 
CANADA: JOHN MURPHY, CKOY Radio, P.O. 

Box 3130, Station C, Ottawa, Ont., Canada 
ARGENTINA: MIGUEL SMIRNOFF, Rafaela 
3978, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tel: 69-1638 
JAPAN: Mgr. SHOICHI KUSANO; Adv. Mgr. 
Morihiro Nagata, 446 Higashi-()izumi Neri- 
maku, Tokyo 

SPAIN: FEDERICO HALPERN, Sagasta 23, 
Apartado 4025, Madrid, Spain 
BRAZIL: LUIS DE M. C. GUEDES, Rua Prof. 
Dr. Jose Marques da Cruz, 75, Brooklin 
Paulista, Sao Paulo, 17, Tel: 61.38.13 
SUBSCRIPTION RATES $15 per year any- 
where in the U. S. A. Published weekly. Second 
class postage paid at Bristol, Conn. 

Copyright © 1964 by The Cash Box Publishing 
Co., Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright under 
Universal Copyright Convention. 


The day-to-day excitement of the 
singles field with its rapid over- 
night success stories frequently 
tends to cloud our minds to other 
important areas of the record 
world responsible for the discov- 
ery and development of new and 
important disk talent. 

One such area which in the past 
year or so has been extremely pro- 
ductive in debuting important new 
stars is the LP world. Perhaps it is 
partly because of necessity and per- 
haps to an extent it is just coinci- 
dence, but it is fact that a number 
of key new performers, with poten- 
tial for long and lasting careers, 
have come front and center during 
the past year the hard way— that is 
via an LP and without the aid of a 
singles hit. 

Names such as Barbra Streisand, 
Robert Goulet, Nancy Wilson, John 
Gary, Peter Nero — personalities 
which the record business refers to 
as “good music” acts — have be- 
come top names solely through the 
slow and steady growth of their al- 
bums. Although singles featuring 
these stars have been released in an 
effort to expedite their exposure, 
the fact that their singles never 
clicked has not stopped them from 
becoming some of the record in- 


dustry’s most prominent perform- 
ers. 

Everyone is well aware of the 
tremendous gamble involved in at- 
tempting to bow new “good music” 
talent through albums. Not only 
does it require tremendous finan- 
cial backing, but other prerequi- 
sites include a great deal of pa- 
tience and the ability to live with 
the frustration of watching great 
talent go nowhere. 

But there is no doubt that the 
attempt to break new “good 
music” talent via LP’s has become 
a business necessity. 

Unfortunately, during recent 
years this area of the business had 
not been overly productive. And, 
no doubt a number of misses dis- 
couraged further attempts with 
other artists. 

But with the fantastic success 
during 1963 of some of the names 
such as those mentioned above, 
there is every indication that more 
companies will make a concerted 
effort to develop gifted new acts 
through LP’s and as a result more 
class artists will receive the send- 
off they deserve. 



CaA Bm 


Cush Box TOP too 



FEBRUARY 15, 1964 


7 

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12 

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16 


18 


19 

20 
21 
22 


24 

25 


27 


30 


32 


34 


Position 2|8 

I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND 

(Duchess — BMI) 1 

☆ BEATLES-Copitol-Sn 2 

YOU DON'T OWN ME 

(Merjoda — BMI) 2 

☆LESLEY GORE-Mercury-72206 

SHE LOVES YOU 

(Gil— BMI) 7 

■i!;rBEATLES-Swan-41 52 

UM, UM, UM, UM, UM, UM 

(Curtom, Jolynne — BMI) 6 

☆MAJOR LANCE-Okeh-7187 

HEY LITTLE COBRA 

(Vadim, Daywin — BMI) 4 

☆RIP CHORDS-Coiumbia-42921 

JAVA 

(Tideland — BMI) 1 1 

☆AL HIRT-RCA Victor-8280 

OUT OF LIMITS 

(Wrist— BMI) 3 

☆MARKETTS-Warner Bros-5391 

FOR YOU 

(M. Witmork & Sons — ASCAP) 9 
☆RICK NELSON-Decca-31574 

WHAT KIND OF FOOL (DO YOU 
THINK I AM) 

( Low-T wi — BMI ) 

☆TAMS-ABC- 10502 

DAWN (GO AWAY) 

(Saturday, Gayadima — ASCAP) 

☆ FOUR SEASONS-Philips-40166 

THERE! I'VE SAID IT AGAIN 

(Valiant — ASCAP) 5 

☆ BOBBY VINTON-Epic-9638 

ANYONE WHO HAD A HEART 


12 


32 


8 


13 


15 


24 


(U. S. Songs— ASCAP) 

☆DIONNE WARWICK-Scepter-1262 

A FOOL NEVER LEARNS 

(Cricket— BMI) 

☆ANDY WILLIAMS-Columbia-42950 

TALKING ABOUT MY BABY 

(Curtom — ^BMI) 
☆IMPRESSIONS-ABC-1051 1 

CALIFORNIA SUN 

(Loyd & Logan — BMI) 
☆RIVIERAS-Riviera-1401 

HOOKA TOOKA 

(Evanston, Woodcrest — BMI) 
☆CHUBBY CHECKER-Parkway-890 

STOP AND THINK IT OVER 

(Crazy Cajun-Red Stick — BMI) 

☆DALE & GRACE-Montel-922 

LOUIE, LOUIE 

(Limax — BMI) 

☆KINGSMEN-Wand-143 
*PAUL REVERE/RAIDERS-Columbia-42814 

SURFIN' BIRD 


19 


27 


10 


(Long— BMI) 

☆TRASHMEN-Garrett-4002 


14 


21 


16 


SOUTHTOWN, U.S.A. 

(Gallico— BMI) 

☆DIXIEBELLES-Sound Stage-7-1517 

POPSICLES AND ICICLES 

(Dragonwick — BMI) 

☆M U RMA I DS-Chattaooche-628 

AS USUAL 

(Samos Island — BMI) 

☆ BRENDA LEE-Decca-31570 

I ONLY WANT TO BE WITH YOU 

(Chappell — ASCAP) 30 

☆DUSTY SPRINGFIELD-Philips-40162 

IT'S ALL IN THE GAME 

(Remick — ASCAP) 25 

☆CLIFF RICHARD-Epic-9633 

FORGET HIM 


17 


(Leeds — ASCAP) 
☆BOBBY RYDELL-Cameo-280 


20 


SEE THE FUNNY LITTLE CLOWN 


(Unart — BMI) 34 

☆BOBBY GOLDSBORO-United Artists-672 


31 


45 


39 


18 


COME ON 

(Fame — BMI) 

☆TOMMY ROE-ABC-10515 

NAVY BLUE 

(Saturday — ASCAP) 

☆DIANE RENAY-20th Fox-456 

A LETTER FROM SHERRY 

(Nu-Star — -BMI) 

☆DALE WARD-Dot-16520 

DAISY PETAL PICKIN' 

(Dundee — BMI) 

☆JIMMY GILMER & FIREBALLS-Dot-1 6539 

I LOVE YOU MORE AND MORE 
EVERY DAY 

(Robertson — ASCAP) 58 

☆AL MARTI NO-Capitol-51 08 

GOING, GOING, GONE 

(Gil— BMI) 38 

☆BROOK BENTON-Mercury-72230 

GOOD NEWS 

(Kags — BMI) 53 

☆SAM COOKE-RCA-8299 

OH BABY DON'T YOU WEEP 

(Jim Jam — BMI) 40 

☆JAMES BROWN-King-5842 


211 

1 

35 

4 

36 

1 1 


8 


6 

m 

18 

40 

7 

41 

12 

42 

25 


70 


7 

45 

10 

46 

14 

47 

21 

48 

51 

49 

28 

50 

64 

51 


© 

5 

53 

33 

• 

9 

55 

13 

• 

45 

57 

30 

58 

14 

• 

52 

60 

41 

61 

69 

• 

50 

• 

15 

64 

75 

• 

48 

66 

72 

67 

84 

• 


Position 218 

THE SHELTER OF YOUR ARMS 

(Print — ASCAP) 42 

☆SAMMY DAVIS JR.-Reprise-2021 6 

HARLEM SHUFFLE 


2|1 


53 


(Marc Jean, Keyman — BMI) 
☆ BOB & EARL-Marc-104 


37 


40 


WHO DO YOU LOVE 


(Hill & Range, Palmina — BMI) 
☆SAPPH I RES-Swan-4 1 62 


49 


63 


I WISH YOU LOVE 


(Leeds — ASCAP) 

☆GLORIA LYNNE-Everest-2036 


56 


77 


ABIGAIL BEECHER 


(Claridge, Halseon — ASCAP) 67 

☆FREDDY CANNON-Warner Bros.-5409 

WOW wow WEE 

89 

73 

FROM ME TO YOU 

(Guild— BMI) 

☆B EATLES-Veejay-522 

74 

— 

(Grand Canyon — BMI) 48 

☆ANGELS-Smash-1870 

YOU'LL NEVER WALK ALONE 

62 

74 

LITTLE BOXES 

(Schroder — ASCAP) 

☆PETE SEEGER-Columbia-42940 

72 

79 

(Williamson — ASCAP) 41 49 

☆PATTI LABELLE & BLUE BELLS-Parkway-986 

GONNA SEND YOU BACK 

75 

COMIN' ON 

(Jec— BMI) 

☆ BILL BLACK'S COMBO-Hi-2072 

81 

88 

TO GEORGIA 



# 

BLUE WINTER 



(Zonn — BMI) 

☆TIMMY SHAW-Wand-146 

44 

54 


(January — BMI) 

☆CONNIE FRANCIS-MGM-13214 

— 

— 

PLEASE, PLEASE ME 




LEAVING HERE 



(Concertone — ASCAP) 

☆ BEATLES- Vee Jay-581 

55 

73 


(Jobete — BMI) 

☆EDDIE HOLLAND-Motown-1052 

— 

— 

PENETRATION 



78 

ROBERTA 



(Dorothy — ASCAP) 
☆PYRAMIDS-Best-13002 

63 

80 


(Sherman, DeVorzan — BMI) 84 

☆ BARRY & TAMERLANES-Valiant-6040 

93 

THE NITTY GRITTY 



• 

RIP VAN WINKLE 



(Gallico- — BMI) 

☆SHIRLEY ELLIS-Congress-202 

23 

17 


(Skidmore — ASCAP) 
☆DEVOTIONS-Roulette-454 1 

95 

— 

WHISPERING 



% 

WORRIED GUY 



(Miller, Fisher — ASCAP) 
☆TEMPO & STEVENS-Atco-6281 

22 

16 


(B. F. Wood— ASCAP) 
☆JOHNNY TlLLOTSON-MGM-13193 

— 

— 

(IT'S NO) SIN 



0 

MY TRUE CARRIE LOVE 



(Algonquin — BMI) 
☆DUPREES-Coed-587 

50 

57 


(Comet — ASCAP) 

☆NAT COLE-Capitol-5125 

— 

— 

SINCE 1 FELL FOR YOU 



0 

HE'LL HAVE TO GO 



(Advance — ASCAP) 

☆LENNY WELCH-Cadence-1439 

29 

20 


(Central Songs — BMI) 
☆SOLOMON BURKE-Atlantic-2218 

— 


DRAG CITY 



83 

LONG GONE LONESOME BLUES 


(Screen Gems, Columbia — BMI) 

26 

22 


(Acuff-Rose — BMI) 

86 

95 


☆JAN & DEAN-Liberty-55641 

THAT GIRL BELONGS TO 
YESTERDAY 


(Piteld — BMI) 

☆GENE PITNEY-Musicor-1036 


57 


65 


33 


SOMEWHERE 

(Wyncote— ASCAP) 

☆TYMES-Parkway-89 1 

CAN YOUR MONKEY DO THE DOG 


29 


65 


86 


61 


66 


71 


(East— BMI) 

☆RUFUS THOMAS-Stax-1 14 

VAYA CON DIOS 

(Ardmore — ASCAP) 
☆DRIFTERS-Atlantic-2216 

422 GLENWOOD AVENUE 

(Merjoda — BMI) 

☆PIXIES THREE-Mercury-72208 

BABY, I LOVE YOU 

(Mother Bertha, Trio — BMI) 
☆RONETTES-Philles-1 1 8 

LIVE WIRE 

(Jobete — BMI) 

☆MARTHA & VANDELLAS-Gordy-7027 

I CAN'T STOP TALKING 
ABOUT YOU 

(Screen Gems, Columbia — BMI) 51 
☆STEVE & EYDlE-Columbia-42932 

HE SAYS THE SAME THINGS TO ME 


28 


24 


70 — 


56 


(Geld-Udell — ASCAP) 
☆SKEETER DAVIS-RCA-8288 


59 


66 


HI-HEEL SNEAKERS 

(Medal — BMI) 

☆TOMMY TUCKER-Checker-1067 

CHARADE 


79 — 


(Southdale & Northern — ASCAP) 43 
☆HENRY MANCINI-RCA-8256 


46 


46 


42 


85 


94 


90 — 


35 


23 


YOU'RE NO GOOD 

(E. H. Morris— ASCAP) 

☆ BETTY EVER ETT-Veejay- 566 

BYE BYE BARBARA 

(Fisher, Elm Drive — ASCAP) 

☆JOHNNY MATHIS-Mercury-72229 

WHAT'S EASY FOR TWO 

(Jobete — BMI) 

☆MARY WELLS-Motown-1048 

DOMINIQUE 

(General Music — ASCAP) 

☆SINGING NUN (SOEUR SOURIRE)-Philips-40163 

MILLER'S CAVE 

(Jack — BMI) 

☆BOBBY BARE-RCA-8294 

PAIN IN MY HEART 

(Jarb— BMI) 

☆OTIS REDDING-Volt-112 

SO FAR AWAY 

(Saturn, Five Point — BMI) 

☆HANK JACOBS-Sue-795 

SHIMMY SHIMMY 


76 — 


54 


47 


75 


(Thin Man — BMI) 
☆ORLONS-Cameo-295 


78 


92 


MY BONNIE 


(P.D.) 80 — 

☆ BEATLES with TONY SHERIDAN-MGM-1 321 3 


70 


I'LL REMEMBER (IN THE STILL 
OF THE NIGHT) 

(Cherio— BMI) 77 85 

☆SANTO & JOHNNY-Canadian-American-1 64 

GLAD ALL OVER 

(Ivy— ASCAP) — — 

☆DAVE CLARK FIVE-Epic-9656 

FUN, FUN, FUN 

(Sea Of Tunes — BMI) — — 

☆ BEACH BOYS-Capitol-5n8 


84 


85 


86 


☆HANK WILLIAMS JR.-MGM-l 3208 

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LONELY 

(Shapiro, Bernstein — ASCAP) 88 

☆CARAVELLES-Smosh-l 869 

WOMAN, LOVE AND A MAN 

(Chevis— BMI) — 

☆TONY CLARKE-Chess-1880 

BIRD DANCE BEAT 


(Wilong— BMI) 
☆TRASHMEN-Garrett-4003 


87 


I DIDN'T KNOW WHAT TIME 
IT WAS 


(Chappell — ASCAP) 
☆CRAMPTON SISTERS-DCP-1001 


88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 


PUPPY LOVE 


(McLaughlin — BMI) 
☆BARBARA LEWIS-Atlantic-2214 


83 


YOUNG AND IN LOVE 


(Robbins — ASCAP) 
☆CHRIS CROSBY-MGM-13191 


89 


98 100 


94 


95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 


WHERE DID I GO WRONG 

(Kalmann — ASCAP) 

■^DEE DEE SHARP-Cameo-296 

PINK DOMINOES 

(Room 7, DImondaire — BMI) 
☆CRESCENTS-Era-3n 6 

HERE COMES THE BOY 

(Saturday — ASCAP) 

☆TRACY DEY-Amy-894 

I'LL BE THERE (TO BRING 
YOU LOVE) 

(Rittenhouse, Travis — BMI) 
☆MAJORS-lmperial-66009 

LOVE WITH THE PROPER 
STRANGER 

(Paramount — ASCAP) 

☆JACK JONES-Kapp-571 

BIG TOWN BOY 

(Saturday — ASCAP) 

☆SHIRLEY MATTHEWS-Atlantic-2210 

LITTLE BOY 

(Mother Bertha, Trio — BMI) 94 

☆CRYSTALS-Philles-1 19 

THE GIRL FROM SPANISH TOWN 

(Marty's Music — BMI) — 

☆MARTY ROBBINS-Columbia-42968 

STAY 

(Cranford — BMI) — 

☆FOUR SEASONS-VeeJay-582 

UNDERSTAND YOUR MAN 

(Cash— BMI) 

☆JOHNNY CASH-Columbia-42964 

HIGH ON A HILL 

(Sultan — BMI) 

☆SCOTT ENGLISH-Spokane-4003 


91 


• SHARP UPWARD MOVE 
☆ BEST SELLING RECORDS 

* OTHER VERSIONS STRONGLY REPORTED 
ALPHABETIZED, TOP 100 IN EACH ISSUE 


1 


Position 2|8 211 j 


92 — II 


92 


99 — J 


99 


98 




COMPILED BY CASH BOX FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS— DOES NOT INCLUDE AIRPLAY REPORTS 


1-WAY SMASH... 


a chart climbing hit single... 

THE PYR AMID S 

PeNelfl^iONJ 

BEST-13002 


.••und now • mm 


Oa national breakout LP 



Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







NARM Plans Invites To Non-Members 
For Its 1964 Convention In Fla. 


PHILADELPHIA— The board of di- 
rectors of the National Association of 
Record Merchandisers voted to extend 
invitations to non-member rack job- 
bing companies to attend the 1964 
NARM Convention, which will be held 
April 19 through April 23, at the Eden 
Roc Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida. 

In making the announcement, Jules 
Malamud, the association’s executive 
director, pointed out the fact that 
NARM is now “the recognized repre- 
sentative of the rack jobbing segment 
of the record industry — both for the 
rack jobbers who belong to NARM 
and for those who do not.” 

Therefore, NARM decided to extend 
the invitation to a selected group of 
non-member rack jobbers to attend 
the convention. 

The non-member rack jobber who 
is invited to attend this convention as 
a guest will participate in all the 
business sessions of the convention, 
and have an opportunity for indoctri- 
nation into the NARM rack jobbers’ 
activity program, an announcement 
said. He will be able to come as a 
convention guest only one time. In 
order to attend future conventions 
and other meetings, he must join as a 
regular member. This feature of the 
1964 Convention, the increased num- 
ber of rack jobbers in attendance, will 
be an added feature for the record 
manufacturers who will be coming to 
the convention to meet with their cus- 
tomers. 

This method of recruiting new as- 
sociation members, it was stated, was 


Columbia Cuts "Dylan'' 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
preserved on disks the original-cast 
performance of the legit stage hit, 
“Dylan.” A bio of part of the life of 
the late poet, Dylan Thomas, the play 
stars Alec Guinness as the poet, with 
Kate Reid as his wife, Caitlin. It was 
cut at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio, 
this city, last Sunday (9). Goddard 
Lieberson, president of Columbia, su- 
pervised the session. Play opened to 
sold critical reviews on Jan. 18. 


Decca Gets ^'Becket'^ Track 

NEW YORK — Decca Records will re- 
lease the soundtrack score to “Beck- 
et,” the upcoming Hal Wallis flick 
starring Richard Burton and Peter 
O’Toole. With a score by Lawrence 
Rosenthal, the flick is set to open in 
New York on March 11, at which time 
the label will release the album. An 
all-out promo effort is being mapped 
jointly by Decca and Paramount Pic- 
tures sales and promo forces aimed at 
radio and TV stations and disk deal- 
ers. 


;.i ndex 

Album Plans 36 

Album Reviews 26, 30, 32 

Bios for DJ’s 40 

Coin Machine Section 60-76 

Country Music Section 50, 51 

International Section 52-59 

Juke Box Ops Record Guide 34 

Looking Ahead (Singles) 16 

Platter Spinner Patter 18 

Radio Active Chart 20 

R & B Top 50 34 

Record Ramblings 38, 39, 40 

Single Reviews 8, 10, 12, 14 

Sure Shots 40 

Top 100 Albums (Mono) 25 

Top 50 Albums (Stereo) 25 

Top 100 Labels 56 

Top 100 Singles (Alphabetized) . 47 

Vending News 66 


6 


borrowed from some of the most suc- 
cessful trade associations in the coun- 
try. Supermarket Institute which re- 
cently celebrated its twenty-sixth year 
of existence, has used this method 
most successfully for years. 

At the NARM Board of Directors 
meet in New York recently, at which 
the plan was approved, a selected list 
of non-member rack jobbers was re- 
viewed and approved by the Board as 
invitation recipients. Invitations will 
be issued through the office of the ex- 
ecutive director, 112 Beverly Road, 
Philadelphia 51, Pennsylvania, and all 
reservation made by that office. Fur- 
ther information on guest invitations 
may be secured by writing to Jules 
Malamud, at the above address. 


Survey Says Teen Gals 
Buy 56.3% Of U.S.' 
Annual Disk Volume 

NEW YORK — 56.3% of annual U.S. 
disk sales belong to teen gals. A de- 
tailed survey on disk-buying habits 
by Seventeen Magazine has revealed 
this statistic along with a host of 
other tied-in data. 

Working on 1,475 responses to a 
questionnaire, the publication has re- 
ported that 11,065,000 teenage girls 
spend $321 million a year on disk pur- 
chases. Last RIAA figures stated that 
the disk industry reached total retail 
sales in 1962 of $570 million, which 
gives the youngsters the 56.3% slice 
of the volume. 

The survey also revealed: Teen 
girls, 10 million of them, have disk 
libraries that average 55.1 singles and 
22.3 albums each; they spend $83 mil- 
lion on singles; $238 million on al- 
bums; they own 7,776,000 phones, lis- 
ten to them 88.5 million hours a week 
(or eight hours for each teener); 
eight out of 10 or 82.9% own singles, 
nine out of 10 own albums. 

During the past six months, the sur- 
vey also revealed, the median price 
paid for singles was $1.03, while al- 
bums was $4.27. Stereo sets owned by 
the group total 3 million, mono 4.5 
million. This year, teen girls will buy 
1,051,000 phonos, with 844,000 
equipped to play stereo disks. 

Teen girl tastes in music were 
listed in the following order: singles: 
rock ’n roll, vocals, dance records, 
novelty disks, folk and jazz; albums: 
vocals, rock ’n roll and classical. 


DGG Bows 7 Feb. IP's 

NEW YORK — Deutsche Grammo- 
phon, distributed by MGM, has an- 
nounced the issue of seven new classi- 
cal packages for Feb. The release in- 
cludes “Wagner Opera Arias” by Jess 
Thomas, “Piano Sonata In B Flat 
Minor” of Schubert with Geza Anda, 
“Viola Concertos of Bartok and 
David” by Budapest State Orchestra 
with Janos Ferencsik, “Monologues 
from Everyman” by Martin with 
Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, “Don Juan/ 
Till Eulenspiegel/Salome’s Dance/ 
Festival Prelude” by Richard Strauss 
with the Berlin Philharmonic con- 
ducted by Karl Boehm; “Beethoven’s 
Symphony No. 3” by the Berlin Phil- 
harmonic with Herbert Von Karajan, 
and Beethoven’s “Symphonies No. 1 
& 2” by the Berlin Philharmonic with 
Herbert von Karajan. 


Victor's George Marek 
Selected To Keynote 
1964 NARM Confab 



GEORGE R. MAREK 


PHILADELPHIA— George R. Marek, 
vice president and general manager of 
the RCA Victor Records, will be the 
keynote speaker at the 1964 Conven- 
tion of the National Association of 
Record Merchandisers (NARM), 
which opens April 19, at the Eden Roc 
Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida. 

Marek will deliver the convention’s 
Keynote Address as the first order of 
the business sessions, which open at 
9 AM, Monday, April 20. Marek will 
speak on the convention theme, “A 
Reaffirmation of Faith.” In a recent 
article in the record industry press, 
Marek expressed his feeling that the 
record industry was a healthy, flour- 
ishing business, with a great and 
prosperous future. Stated Jules Mala- 
mud, NARM’s exec director: “It was 
with this type of optimistic view at 
the future, with a positive approach 
to the present situation and confidence 
in what lies before the industry, that 
the members of NARM will convene 
at their Sixth Annual Meeting. We 
feel that Mr. Marek is the ideal man 
to set our convention in this direc- 
tion, and we are all extremely pleased 
that he will be with us.” 

George Berry (Modern Record Serv- 
ice, New Orleans), chairman of the 
1964 NARM convention, also an- 
nounced that other speakers at the 
convention will include a presenta- 
tion by university marketing experts, 
addresses by the NARM legal staff 
on the Federal Trade Commission, the 
Trade Practice Conference, and other 
legal situations with which the in- 
dustry is concerned. These speakers 
will be in addition to those industry 
representatives who will participate in 
all phases of the Business Sessions. 


5 Classical Sets In 
Decca's Feb. Release 

NEW YORK^ — Decca Records has an- 
nounced the release of four new clas- 
sical packages and a stereo issue of 
an earlier Segovia set for its Feb. 
release. 

The new sets include a stereo ver- 
sion of Segovia’s “Concierto del Sur” 
and “Fantasia Para Un Gentilhom- 
bre,” “Handel’s Organ Concertos Vol- 
umes 3 & 4” by Marie Claire Alain, 
Soprano Judith Raskin and the Fes- 
tival Orchestra of New York con- 
ducted by Thomas Dunn performing 
two major works by Bach, and 
Haydn’s Clock Symphony and Toy 
Symphony” by the Paris Chamber 
Orchestra under the direction of Paul 
Kuentz. 


4 New RIAA Members 

NEW YORK — RIAA, the disk indus- 
try association, has four new mem- 
bers. They include: 20th Century-Fox 
Records, Pickwick Int’l, Premier Al- 
bums and Tory Records. 


armada's 6th Annual 
Confab Set For Miami 
Beach (June 24-July 1) 

NEW YORK — ARMADA, the distrib 
association, has announced the time 
and place of its sixth annual conven- 
tion. 

Based on “indicated preference” of 
the organization’s officers, the distri>is 
will, as thev did last year, meet in 
Miami Beach, Florida at the Eden 
Roc Hotel from June 24-July 1, ac- 
cording to Amos Heilicher, ARMA- 
DA’.s nresident. 

While the main direction that the 
meet will take has not been formal- 
ized yet. an announcement pointed-out 
that a “good part of the program” 
will be devoted to Trade Practice 
Rules. ARMADA has just made 
known its trade-rules proposals, de- 
signed to be evaluated by the Federal 
Trade Commission and ARMADA 
membership before the start of the 
FTC’s Trade Practices Conference for 
the disk industry (see separate story). 

The convention will probably be 
carried-out under the general slogan 
of “A New Era for Recordings,” an 
announcement also stated. 

The broad convention program will 
be divided in the following manner: 
Registration will take place on Wed. 
(24) and Thurs. (25); Sat. (26) will 
be the start of meets between dis- 
tribs and labels; regular convention 
business will take place Sun. (27) 
and Mon. (28); additional distrib- 
label meets will be held on the final 
three days (29, 30, July 1). 


Columbia's Western Reqion 
Ups Jan. Sales By 72% 

Hollywood — January sales were up 
72% over Jan. 1963 for Columbia Rec- 
ords’ operation in 13-western state 
region. 

Gene Block, regional sales man- 
ager who announced the sales in- 
crease, said he based the report on 
figures received from Ted Rosenberg, 
branch manager of Columbia Records 
Distributors, Patrick Butler, vp of 
H. R. Basford Co., San Francisco, and 
Lauren Davies, general manager of 
the Craig Corp., all who distribute the 
label’s product. 

Citing Columbia’s “Age of Reason” 
stabilization moves as an “immeas- 
urable aid” to this showing, Butler of 
H. R. Basford stated that “we find 
that returns from dealers were 500% 
lower than they were for the com- 
parable period in 1963” and that “it 
would seem that with the year-round 
program established by Columbia, 
dealers are less inclined to overload.” 

Lauren Davies of Craig Corp. said 
that the program is “encouraging 
dealers to buy sensibly, with the re- 
sult that there are less returns. . . .” 

Ted Rosenberg reported that lead- 
ing artists in the Jan. sales bonanza 
included Tony Bennett, The New 
Christy Minstrels, Ray Conniff, Percy 
Faith, Barbra Streisand, Andy Wil- 
liams and The Bruno Walter classical 
releases for Jan. 

lililllH 

SAN REMO WINNER 

The winning song of the just-con- 
cluded San Remo Song Festival is 
“Hon Ho L’Eta Per Amarti (I’m Not 
Old Enough to Love You).” The song, 
published by Sugar Music, was writ- 
ten by the melody team of Nisa & 
Colonnello with lyrics by Panzeri. For 
complete run-down of the contest, in 
words and photos, see International 
Section, pages 52 and 53. 

Illllllililllllllillilllilillllil 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


ARMADA Maps Industry Rules 
For Look-See By FTC 


NEW YORK — ARMADA, the distrib 
organization, has prepared a set of 
trade practice rules for the disk in- 
dustry. The rules were drawn-up by 
ARMADA in view of the upcoming 
Federal Trade Commission-sponsored 
Trade Practices Conference, which 
has a tentative starting date of Mar. 
13. 

Copies of the ARMADA-proposed 
rules have been mailed to the associa- 
tion’s members. In an accompanying 
letter, Edgar Jones, exec secretary, 
asks each member to determine the 
merits of the rules, which present 24 
guide-lines for the industry to follow. 
"If you think these rules are what 
you want,” the letter states, “say so. 
If you think any rules at all are un- 
desirable — say so. If there are parti- 
cular rules which you would want to 


R. F. Cook Named To 
New Post At RCA Int'l 



R. F. COOK 


NEW YORK — R. F. Cook has a new 
post at RCA Victor Records, that of 
manager of merchandising and manu- 
facturing administration of subsid 
firms. 

Cook, formerly subsid firms’ head 
of manufacturing and engineering, 
will, as part of his new duties, rec- 
ommend objectives, policies, programs 
and budgets for improvement of for- 
eign disk production facilities of Vic- 
tor’s affiliates overseas. 

He will also coordinate with the in- 
ternational dept, of Victor in the de- 
velopment of special marketing efforts 
and sales projects to promote the sale 
of Victor disks abroad. 

While maintaining close co-ordina- 
tion with the sales and merchandising 
organizations of each of the subsids. 
Cook will keep them and the int’l. 
dept, informed of successful local mar- 
keting efforts and sales projects for 
possible adoption in other locations. 

Another of Cook’s assignments will 
be to develop label representation and 
music publishing contracts on behalf 
of Victor’s foreign set-ups. 

Cook, associated with Victor since 
1943, was named to the post by Eu- 
gene Dailey, vp of the international 
division. 


Set Flick Bio 
Of Singing Nun 

NEW YORK — A film bio of The Sing- 
ing Nun is being readied. Rights to 
such a feature effort have been ob- 
tained by John Beck and Hayes Goetz, 
who got clearances from the Belgian 
nun and Philips Records, whose rec- 
ordings of her material will be used 
in the film. An actress has yet to be 
named for the lead role. Part of the 
flick’s income will be donated to the 
nun’s Dominican Order. 


see strengthened — or even to have 
them ‘watered down’ — say so.” 

The ARMADA proposed rules are 
one set of several which will be pre- 
sented to the FTC for its evaluation. 
Other proposed rules will be submitted 
to the F'TC by other music industry 
associations. The FTC is expected to 
draw-up its own rules with the aid 
of these proposals. 

As a result of a front-page story in 
last week’s issue of Billboard, there 
was confusion as to the source of the 
rules that had been proposed by 
ARMADA. The headline stated that 
“FTC Proposed Rules Challenge In- 
dustry” and story copy led readers to 
believe that the FTC had drawn up 
the rules. 

The Billboard story prompted Jules 
Malamud, executive director of 
NARM, the rack- jobber organization, 
to mail a letter to its membership 
clarifying the matter. “They are rules 
which have been drawn-up by ARM- 
ADA, the distributors’ association, 
which represents only one facet of the 
industry,” Malamud declares. “Al- 
though there is merit in the rules 
proposed, we in NARM do not feel 
they adequately cover enough area.” 
Malamud also noted that Albert A. 
Carretta, N ARM’s special legal coun- 
sel for the Trade Practices Confer- 
ence. is currently working with the 
NARM board of directors on a set of 
proposed rules. He added that all of 
NARM’s regular members (rack-job- 
bers) will have an opportunity to see 
and comment on these rules prior to 
the Conference. NARM will definitely 
not make its trade rules proposals 
public prior to their submission to the 
FTC. 

The ARMADA rules, on the other 
hand, are available to various seg- 
ments of the industry upon request to 
Edgar Jones at his office in New York. 


Atlantic & Atco Report 
Strong Response To "Periods 
Of Adjustment" Plan 

NEW YORK — The Atlantic and Atco 
labels have reported an unqualified 
success for their “Period of Adjust- 
ment” album program, according to 
Len Sachs, director of LP sales 
merchandising. 

Two major west coast distribs, R. A. 
Harlan of C&C in Seattle, and Bob 
Chatton of Chatton Dist. in Oakland, 
Calif., have informed the label that 
the plan is proving to be one of the 
“best ever” blue-printed by an indie 
label. 

In addition to a regular LP discount 
incentive (12%%), the firms are giv- 
ing distrib salesmen a chance to cash- 
in on a “Salesmen’s Commission 
Fund,” which the diskery feels will 
help solve the problem of distribs 
maintaining a strong sales staff, while 
salesmen’s incomes have been reduced 
because of the emergence of large dis- 
count stores, rack-jobber house ac- 
counts and fewer retailers. 

Along with the program, four new 
albums were released, all of which, 
the label reports, are getting a good 
sales response. These include “Apollo 
Saturday Night,” with various artists, 
Barbara Lewis’ “Snap Your Fingers,” 
“The Sheriff” by The Modern Jazz 
Quartet, and “Tapestry” by Chuck 
Wayne on the Atlantic-handled Focus 
label. 

The “Apollo” album is being sin- 
gled out by the diskery for special 
promo attention, with a broad ad cam- 
paign in both trade and consumer pub- 
lications and store window displays 
with specially designed easel backs. 

Most avenues of promo and merch- 
andising are being used to push all 
the new packages. 


Talmadge Exits UA; Dave Picker 
Becomes Label’s President; Other 
Execs Get New Responsibiiities 


NEW YORK — Following the an- 
nounced resignation of Art Talmadge 
as president of United Artists Records 
last week, the diskery has given added 
responsibilities to its exec line-up. 

Talmadge leaves UA as of March 
1, at which time he will officially be- 
gin operation of his own diskery (see 


will become president of the label. 
“During the nearly four years that 
he has served as president of the rec- 
ord company,” Picker said, “it has 
enjoyed a continuing growth. We wish 
all the best to him in his endeavors.” 

In addition to Picker, new respon- 
sibilities will be assumed by Mike 



DAVE PICKER 


MIKE STEWART 




SI MAEL 


separate story). Head of the disk affi- 
liate of United Artists Pictures for 
the past four years, his resignation 
was accepted with “regret” by David 
V. Picker, vp of the UA Corp., who 

Talmadge Forming His 
Own Label In N.Y. 

NEW YORK — Art Talmadge, who 
leaves the top post at United Artists 
Records on Mar. 1 (see separate 
story), will form his own label oper- 
ating out of New York, Cash Box has 
learned. The label, as yet un-named, 
will begin operation immediately fol- 
lowing Talmadge’s departure from 
UA. 

Distribution for the new label has 
not yet been set. 

Vee Jay Moves Main 
Offices To HVood 

NEW YORK — As rumored for the 
past several months, Vee Jay Records 
has re-located its headquarters in 
Hollywood. Diskery, which previously 
operated out of Chicago, is now lo- 
cated at 9056 Santa Monica Blvd. Ac- 
cording to the label, move was made 
to put the operation in a center of 
various entertainment areas, includ- 
ing disks, movies and TV. 


London Rushes San Remo LP 
Into Release In A Week 



NEW YORK — London Records has 
rushed its LP covering the San Remo 
Song Festival songs into release with- 
in a week of the termination of the 
festival. 

The awards were made on Feb. 1, 
and one week later, tbe disks were 
pressed, the jackets printed, and the 
package made available for issue. This 
feat was accomplished by having all 
the nominated songs taped in advance 
by Italian singers, liners and four 
color covers printed in advance, and 
the mastering of the LP on the final 
night of the contest. C.G.D. of Italy, 
a London affiliate, was instrumental 
in finalizing the preparation of the 
album. 


Stewart, at present exec vp of UA’s 
publishing firms, who has also been 
appointed exec vp of the label. 

Si Mael, currently UA vp, becomes 
general manager of the UA label, and 
as director of business affairs will 
supervise day to day activities. 

In the reorganization, key UA execs 
will add to their duties as dept, heads. 
Lloyd Leipzig, director of creative 
services, will direct the activities of 
the publicity-ad departments, serve as 
liaison to the parent film company 
and tie-in with artists’ relations and 
the creative talent on the label’s ros- 
ter. 

National sales head Joe Berger is 
assuming complete control of the 
sales of album product for UA and 
its subsid labels, while Andy Miele 
will be in complete charge of singles 
for all labels. A&R director Jack Gold 
will supervise singles product and 
musical director LeRoy Holmes will 
continue as chief album producer for 
UA. Foreign and legal departments 
continue under the helm of Sid 
Shemel, while Ron Nackman con- 
tinues in charge of all phases of pro- 
duction. 

Commenting on the reorganization. 
Picker said that: “The new United 
Artists team is indeed a crack one — • 
each of whom has proven his worth 
in the past and substantially contri- 
buted to the great growth of the com- 
pany. The talent, know-how and en- 
thusiasm of this staff as they resume 
their additional duties can only result 
in United Artists Records assuming 
an even more important role in the 
industry in the future.” 

Jay Jacobs Leaving UA 
For D.C. Distrib Post 

New York — Jay Jacobs has left his 
post as director of sales merchandis- 
ing for United Artists Records to be- 
come a vp and general manager of 
District Records Inc., a division of 
Schwartz Bros, of Washington, D.C., 
leading disk distrib. At DR, Jacobs will 
work closely with Eddie Tauber in 
furthering the expansion of the or- 
ganization, a merchandising division 
of the Schwartz set-up. He assumes 
his new post on Feb. 15. Jacobs served 
UA for two years, starting as eastern 
sales manager in 1962. Last April, he 
was appointed director of sales mer- 
chandising. Before joining UA, he 
was eastern sales manager for Dot 
Records. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


7 













CoaJi Box 




RECORD REVIEWS 

• best bet B+ very good B good C+ fair C mediocre 

only those records best suited for commercial use are reviewed by Cash Box 



Pick of the Week 


“KISSIN’ COUSINS” (2:12) [Gladys ASCAP— Wise, Starr] 

“IT HURTS ME” (2:27) [Elvis Presley BMI— Byers, Daniels] 
ELVIS PRESLEY (RCA Victor 8307) 

Presley checks in with another dandy item that’s sure to bust loose in 
no time flat. Top half’s the title tune of Elvis’ forthcoming flick, “Kissin’ 
Cousins.” It’s a captivating romantic rock-a-rhythmic that EP and the 
Jordanaires belt out in sparkling style. There’s a complete change of 
pace in the emotional beat-ballad companion piece, “It Hurts Me.” Two- 
sided sales dynamite once again. 


“I’M YOUR HOOCHIE COOCHE MAN” (2:39) [Arc BMI— Dixon] 
“THE ROAD I’M ON (GLORIA)” (3:44) [Mubon BMI— DiMuci] 
DION DI MUCI (Columbia 42977) 

“I’m Your Hoochie Cooche Man,” the years-back r&b success can soon 
be making the chart rounds once again — as a result of this follow up 
session to Dion’s current smash, “Drip Drop.” It puts the songster in a 
real down home blues light (vocally and on harmonica and guitar) that’s 
sure to make his large following sit up and take notice. Reverse etching 
finds the songster in a soft and lovely folk mood. 


“BABY, DON’T YOU CRY” “MY HEART CRIES FOR YOU” 
(2:32) [Leeds- ASCAP — Johnson] (2:46) [Ross, Jungnickel, Gladys, 

Massey-ASCAP — Sigman-Faith] 

RAY CHARLES (ABC-Paramount 10530) 

Charles can capture top-of-the-chart attention with both ends of this 
new offering. “Baby Don’t You Cry” has the blueser taking a new turn 
on something called the ‘Swingova,’ a Latin-swing coupling that seems 
a natural for the chanter. The other cut, “My Heart Cries For You,” the 
Guy Mitchell oldie is a soul-lover’s delight. Take your pick on this two- 
sided block-buster. 


“STARDUST” (2:56) [Mills ASCAP— Carmichael, Parish] 

“1-45” (1:45-1-1:00) [Leigh ASCAP — Tempo] 

NINO TEMPO & APRIL STEVENS (Atco 6286) 

The brother-sister act, which has made a happy habit out of reviving 
the oldies in smash style, a la “Deep Pui-ple” and “Whispering,” are a 
cinch to do it again with a ‘natural’ for them — “Stardust.” The fantastic 
Carmichael-Parish standard opens with April softly waxing the tune’s 
verse-against a fine tenor sax solo by Nino, and then breaking into the 
duo’s now famous vocal blending. Side can go all the way. 'The clever 
western-styled weeper thumper on the other half revolves around the 
tag, “1-45.” 

“I WONDER WHO’S KISSING HER NOW” (2:38) 

[Jerry Vogel ASCAP — Howard, Hough, Adams] 

“AS LONG AS I’M SINGING” (1:36) [T.M. BMI— Darin] 
BOBBY DARIN (Capitol 5126) 

Darin’s back in the Nashville-styled ballad groove and it looks like 
more money-in-the-bank for all concerned. It’s the lovely sentimental 
oldie, “I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now,” that Bobby and his ork- 
choral accompaniment deliver in a schmaltzy, easy-goin’ fashion. Back- 
ing, “As Long As I’m Singing,” has the chanter slickly carving out a 
class-swing affair. 


“HE’S A GOOD GUY (YES HE IS)” (2:20) [Jobete BMI— Robinson] 
“GODDESS OF LOVE” (2:39) [Jobete BMI — Holland, Dozier, Gorman] 
THE MARVELETTES (Tamla 54091) 

The Tamla hit-makers are served up another platter that has what it 
takes for chartdom. Side to watch is “He’s A Good Guy (Yes He Is),” a 
bright, happy-go-lucky romantic pounder that the femmes wax in top 
teen manner. It’s chock full of those ultra-commercial vocal and instru- 
mental sounds. Get with it. Backing’s a soft, subdued cha cha beat opus 
that falls pleasantly on the ears. 




Pick of the Week 


“BILLY OLD BUDDY” (2:26) [Arch ASCAP— Ballard, Jr., Tobias] 
“IN THE MORNING GLORIA” (2:38) 

[Boston Road BMI — Raleigh, Wayne] 

JOEY POWERS (Amy 898) 

Joey Powers, who hit the big time in a big way with “Midnight 
Mary,” can have another ‘top ten’er’ on his hands in this new Amy stand. 
It’s a tearful, teen-folk cha cha affair on which he finds out that his 
“Billy Old Buddy” has stolen his sweetheart. The very pretty folk-styled 
filter, “In The Morning Gloria,” is culled from Joey’s “Midnight Mary” 
LP. Watch it, too! A1 Gorgoni’s arrangements are most attractive. 

“PERMANENTLY LONELY” (3:06) [Pamper BMI— Nelson] 
“CALL ME” (2:47) [Vogue BMI— Hendricks, Otis] 

TIMI YURO (Liberty 55665) 

The potent tune, “Permanently Lonely” (penned by hit country artist- 
tunesmith Willie Nelson), is a good bet to give Timi Yuro her next big 
chart berth. It’s an emotion-packed, crying towel ballad that the lark 
delivers with touching sincerity. Fine choral-ork backing from Marty 
Paich & Co. Timi also does a superb job on the Belford Hendricks-ar- 
ranged soul-packed beat-ballad undercut, “Call Me.” 


“ALWAYS IN MY HEART” (2:30) [Southern ASCAP— Lecuona] 
“MOONLIGHT AND SHADOWS” (2:07) 

[Paramount ASCAP — Hollander, Robin] 

LOS INDIOS TABAJARAS (RCA Victor 8313) 

The two guitar playing Indians from Brazil, Los Indios Tabajaras, 
who created a sales and airplay chart sensation with their soft, charm- 
ing reading of “Maria Elena,” can be in for more of the same with their 
latest Victor pressing. One half’s the beautiful Ernesto Lecuona mel- 
ody, “Always In My Heart,” that the duo again serves up in easy-on-the 
ears style. There’s more of the same fine sounds on the lovely oldie, 
“Moonlight And Shadows.” Two ‘must programming’ items. 


“LONNIE ON THE MOVE” (2:05) [Carlson, Edwood BMI— Mack] 
“SAY SOMETHING NICE TO ME” (2:37) 

[Dyche BMI — Pennington] 

LONNIE MACK (Fraternity 920) 

The versatile vocalist-instrumentalist can get back in the chart swing- 
of-things with his newest for Fraternity. It’s a frantic, hard-driving 
all-instrumental affair, tabbed “Lonnie On The Move,” that can go the 
“Memphis”-“Wham!” smash route. The easy-on-the-ears beat-ballad ro- 
mantic shuffler, “Say Something Nice To Me,” displays Lonnie’s winning 
vocal way. 


“HEY, BIG BOY” (2:16) [Merjoda BMI— Madera, White] 

“THE OTHER SIDE OF TOWN” (2:15) 

[Merjoda BMI — Carlucci, Torres, Madera, White] 

THE SECRETS (Philips 40173) 

The Secrets, who made their presence felt with their chart-making bow, 
“The Boy Next Door,” should continue to do likewise with their newest 
Mercury effort. It’s a romping twist handclapper, tabbed “Hey, Big Boy,” 
that the four femmes carve out in spirited teen style. Sock-rock arrange- 
ment by Madera, White & Lee. On the flip the gals cha cha over to “The 
Other Side Of Town” — where it’s not so nice. 


“TELL OLD BILL” (2:36) [Teena ASCAP— Mitchell] 

“THE TARRIERS SONG” (1:59) 

[Teena ASCAP — Frazier, Kobluk, Mitchell] 

CHAD MITCHELL TRIO (Mercury 72234) 

The Chad Mitchell Trio, who hit last time out with “The Marvelous 
Toy,” are a cinch to repeat that success with this potent follow-up stanza 
tagged “Tell Old Bill.” The tune is a medium-paced plaintive folk-blueser 
all about a guy who has some major problems. Deejays should really dig 
it. The flip, “The Tarriers Song,” is a lively updating of the folk oldie 
about a bunch of drillers. 

“NADINE” (2:30) [Arc BMI— Berry] 

“O RANGUTANG” (2:15) [Arc BMI— Berry] 

CHUCK BERRY (Chess 1883) 

Chuck Berry has had Top 100 hits in the past and he can do it again 
with this up-dated version of “Nadine,” the years-back chart maker. The 
tune, which is already getting regional action, is a hard-driving, rhyth- 
mic pop-blues tear-jerker essayed with authority and feeling by the chan- 
ter. The coupler, “0 Rangutang,” is a low-key r&b instrumental with 
some interesting rapidly-changing melodic constructions. 


“(THAT’S) WHAT THE NITTY GRITTY IS” (2:31) 

[A1 Gallico BMI— Chase] 

“GET OUT” (2:22) [A1 Gallico BMI— Chase] 

SHIRLEY ELLIS (Congress 208) 

Shirley Ellis, the gal who made the “Nitty Gritty” a top teen dance 
attraction, explains “(That’s) What The Nitty Gritty” is on her new 
Congress outing. And it’s more than likely that the lark’s rockin’ 
description will land her another smasheroo. There’s crowd shout ex- 
citement and a fabulous Hutch Davie arrangement on this delight. 
Shirley does a slick job on the quick beat blueser on the flip. 


David Houston’s “Passing Through” on Epic is loaded with dual-mart, 
pop-country chart potential. See Country Reviews. 


8 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







ir The Sales 


Their first hit single for PhilipsI 
Today's top new group with a fresh 
new sound that’s really unique! 


Dusty Springfield 401$2 

The first solo hit by the gorgeous 
English ga!! An exciting, driving re- 
lease that's headed for the top! 


^ The Bi^ 

Excitement 

ir All on the Bi^ 
Philips Label 



2 GIANT SINGLES JUST RELEASED 


“CROOKED 
LITTLE MAN” 

The Serendipity Singers 

40175 

From the fast selling LP by the sen- 
sational new pop-folk group that’s 
hitting big all over! 


“HEY BIG BOY” 

The Secrets 40173 

Hit No. 2 for this top new act. 


a / ■ 



AND MORE GREAT NEW SINGLES RELEASES! 


A RHYTHM & BLUES HIT 


“FUNNY WHAT TIME WILL DO” 

Sylvia Shemwell 40149 

One of the most exciting R&B re- 
leases in years by a gal with more 
sound and soul than anyone in the 
business today! 


“I’M STILL 
LOVING YOU” 

The Frontiers 40148 

Fresh, unusual blending of voices 
for a real fine tune. This one is very 
alive and could hit the top across 
the board! 


“THERE’S 

ANOTHER 

MAN” 

Johnny Sea 


40164 


“NE SOIS PAS 
SI BETE” 

(“Don't be 80 stupid”) 


Great new talent ... great new 

voice and a unique backing that 

could make push to the top of Pop 
and Country charts everywhere! 


France Gall 


40172 


The teen-age rage from Franc 
makes her first Philips singh 
Should be another big Philips h: 
from Europe. 


PHILIPS RECORDS ONE WORLD OF MUSIC 


ON ONE GREAT LABEL! 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


9 












<c -•*> 'V X-\‘^ '.. 



Cash Box 





RECORD REVIEWS 

o best bet B+ very good B good C+ fair C mediocre 

only those records best suited for commercial use are reviewed by Cash Box 


Newcomer Picks 


“NEEDLES AND PINS” (2:14) [Metric BMI— Nitzsche, Bono] 

“AIN’T THAT JUST LIKE ME” (2:24) [Trio BMI— Carroll, Guy] 
THE SEARCHERS (Kapp 577) 

The red-hot English disk, “Needles And Pins,” is now available in 
the U.S. on Kapp. It’s a sensational ‘Liverpool’ treatment, by the 
Searchers, of the short-while-back click for Liberty’s Jackie DeShannon. 
The artists’ teen appealing, thump-a-rhythm delivery is a cinch to send 
the tune back up the U.S. charts once again. The sizzling, rock-a-twist 
underlid’s cleverly built around a host of nursery rhymes. Can be 
a double-header. 

“CROOKED LITTLE MAN” (2:42) 

[Serendipity BMI — Bowers, Sennett, Madden] 
“FREEDOM’S STAR” (2:30) [Serendipity BMI— Sennett] 
SERENDIPITY SINGERS (Philips 40175) 

This nine-strong crew of pop-folk newcomers could have a chart item 
on their hands with this initial Philips single release tabbed “Crooked 
Little Man.” The tune is a charming medium-paced nonesense song with 
a happy calypso. Side is culled from the group’s recently-released pre- 
miere LP named after themselves. The flip, “Freedom’s Star,” is a 
hard-driving, rhythmic message-song with an infectious uptempo melody. 

“I’M IN LOVE” (2:07) [Northern ASCAP — Lennon, McCartney] 
“RESPECTABLE” (2:04) [Wemar BMI— Isley, Isley, Isley] 

THE FOURMOST (Atco 6285) 

Here’s another hit English group that can soon make the Top 100 
grade in the U.S. It’s the Fourmost, who do a solid job with “I’m In 
Love,” a tune cleffed by two of the Beatles, John Lennon and Paul 
McCartney. Side, currently riding high in English, is a ‘Liverpool- 
styled’ rocker that the teeners’ll love. The fast moving thumper, “Re- 
spectable,” was a while-back noise-maker for the Isley Bros. 


“I MUST BE DREAMING” (2:35) 

[Screen Gems-Columbia BMI — Sedaka, Greenfield] 
“NOBODY’S ASKING QUESTIONS” (2:31) 

[Screen Gems-Columbia BMI — Greenfield, Keller] 

THE BARRY SISTERS (Colpix 722) 

The polished vocal duo can finally make it big on the singles scene 
via this Clolpix stand. Side, tabbed “I Must Be Dreaming,” is a tanta- 
lizing, tailored-for-teen-tastes romancer from the handclapping, cha 
cha beat Neil Sedaka school (he’s a co-writer). Deejay exposure can 
send it soaring. Backing’s a tasty, country-styled shuffler dubbed “No- 
body’s Asking Questions (But Everybody Wants To Know).” 

“THE CATERPILLAR SONG” (2:45) [Benell BMI — Rubinson, Karmen] 
“HELLO HAPPY HAPPY GOODBYE” (1 :53) 

[Bennell, Elsmere BMI — Karmen] 

THE CATERPILLARS (Port 70038) 

Look for the Caterpillars to cash in on the craze created by fellow- 
insect’ vocalists, the Beatles. It’s a real catchy jump-a-thumper, tabbed 
“The Caterpillar Song,” that tells how the famous group got its name. 
There’s an “Alley-Oop,” background flavor to this delighter that has 
the Personna blade ‘coo coo’ sound blotting out the Beatles name. Under- 
lid’s a cut high-speed novelty. 

“AFTER THE SHOWERS COME FLOWERS” (2:22) 

[Jobete BMI — Hemric, Styner] 

“DON’T BE A CRY BABY” (2:29) [Rickland BMI— Motola, Page] 
JOANNE & THE TRIANGLES (V.I.P. 25003) 

The brand new V.I.P. label, nationally distributed by the Tamla- 
Motown set-up can get off swinging with this one that bows Joanne 
& The Triangles. Side to watch is “After The Showers Come Flowers,” 
an extremely pretty cha cha beat opus that the femmes render in a 
“Popsicles And Icicles” pixie-like manner. Coupler’s a catchy, ear- 
pleasing bouncer. 


“I GOTTA DRIVE” (2:37) 

[Screen Gems-Columbia BMI — Mann, Christian] 

“LA CORRIDA” (2:20) 

[Screen Gems-Columbia BMI — Minichiello, Diaz, Sanchez, Berry] 
THE MATADORS (Colpix 718) 

Chances are the Matadors will take a ‘hot rod’ ride to hitsville with 
this one. Tabbed “I Gotta Drive,” it’s a pulsating, hard-hitting affair 
that opens with a gal telling why her guy’s gotta win the ‘Drag City’ 
sweepstakes. Jan Berry-arranged terrific sound effects of the race round 
out the winner. Coupler’s a fetching Latin-rock affair with Spanish- 
language statements along the way. 



THE RIVINGTONS (Liberty 55671) 
• “WEEJEE WALK” (2:04) 

[Ardmore ASCAP — Mincy, 
Smith] Many a kid may start dancin’ 
the happy “weejee walk” way and do 
it while hearing this joyful blues-rock 
cut. Very catchy teen merry-making. 
Should be eyed. 

(B) “FAIRY TALES” (2:30) 

[Ardmore ASCAP — Mincy, 
Mincy] Pace here is fast and good- 
natured. 


NANCY WILSON (Capitol 5133) 

& “DON’T RAIN ON MY PA- 

RADE” (2:12) [Chappell 
ASCAP — Merrill, Styne] An exciting 
declaration from the upcoming musi- 
cal, “Funny Girl,” receives a bang-up 
reading from the hot stylist and her 
hip-swinging ork backdrop. Good- 
music outlets will probably go all-out 
on the side, which could mean chart 
sales. 

(B) “THE GRASS IS GREENER” 

(2:04) [Kacydee ASCAP — 
Smith, Maxwell] Another colorful 
showing in jazz-waltz time. 


KAI WINDING (Verve 10313) 

® “MONDO CANE #2” (1:53) 

[E.B. Marks BMI — Oliviero] 
Winding was previously involved in a 
hit sound on the big ballad, “More,” 
from the flick “Mondo Cane,” and 
excitement similar to the “Cane” 
stint also marks this entry. It should 
be watched closely. 

(B) “PORTRAIT OF MY LOVE” 

(1:50) [Piccadilly BMI — West, 
Ornadel] A shade milder use of the 
top-half arrangement on the recent 
hit. 


ADAM WADE (Epic 9659) 

@ “A WHISPER AWAY” (2:33) 

[Print ASCAP — Samuels] 
The diskery’s fine legit songster adds 
another strong croon job to his cata- 
log. 'Tune is very appealing, and, 
needless to say, Wade’s in full com- 
mand of its sentiments. Could be a 
big airwaves item. 

9 “SEVEN LOVES FOR SEV- 

EN DAYS” (2:40) [Screen 
Gems-Columbia BMI — St. John] 
There’s a dash of a teen-market idea 
to this interesting stand. Also a likely 
big programming item. 


FRANKIE LAINE (Columbia 42966) 
• “LONELY DAYS OF WIN- 

TER” (2:13) [Guitar BMI— 
Leib, Laine] A touching lost-love ex- 
pression is understandingly multi- 
tracked by the songster, who is ac- 
companied by an interesting hint-of- 
the-beat ork-chorus sound. Chorus 
employs a striking “gong” sound on 
the word “gone.” Could happen with 
enough airtime. 

(B) “UP AMONG THE STARS 

(Entre Les Etoiles)” (2:52) 
[Genei-al ASCAP — Regney, Sourire] 
'The Singing Nun wrote this haunting 
inspirational number, which is taste- 
fully performed with English lyrics. 


THE McGUIRE SISTERS 
(Reprise 0256) 

• “NOW & FOREVER” (2:30) 

[Roosevelt BMI — Kaempfert, 
Gabler] The vet larks have a highly 
inviting sentimental here, and true to 
their good-music reputation, they do 
a nifty job against a bright ork back- 
drop. Portion is one of the gal’s top 
sides in some time. Could make it. 
(B) “NEVER” (2:25) [American 

BMI — Fell] Softer ballad 
blend by the femmes. 



FRANCE GALL (Philips 40172) 

• “NE SOIS PAS SI BETE” 
(2:16) [Nancy, Integrity, 

Josie ASCAP — Wolf, Bower, Delanoe] 
France Gall, a teenage Gallic thrush, 
could well have a hit on her youthful 
hands with this delightful, rockin’ 
affair about a girl who is mad because 
her boyfriend won’t hold her tightly 
when they are dancing. The gal’s plea, 
which is the English tag, is “Don’t Be 
So Stupid.” 

(B-h) “PENSE A MOI” (2:32) 
[Nancy, Integrity, ASCAP- 
Datin, Gall] This time out the lark 
dishes-up an interesting bluesy jazz- 
flavored ballad. Nice change-of-pace 
programming. 

RAMONA KING (Warner Bros. 5416) 
m “IT'S IN HIS KISS” (1:57) 
[T. M./Old Lyne — BMI — 
Clark] Ramona King could strike pay- 
dirt with this big beat tune potently 
backed by a femme chorus and ork. 
It’s fashioned after the Rocky Fellers 
delivery and should have broad teen 
appeal. Brisk sales are indicated. 

(B-(-) “IT COULDN’T HAPPEN TO 
A NICER GUY” (2:15) [Bri- 
arcliff /Marathon — BMI — Nuckles, Ri- 
opelle] Here’s a happy-sounding opus 
by the lark and group geared for teen 
dancing pleasure. Could also make 
sales headway. 

BRET & TERRY (Prestige 313) 

• “BEATLE FEVER” (2:05) — 
The jazz label strays into the 

teen arena with timely subject matter. 
The twosome and its musician friends 
attack with pro rock authority. Theme 
and its reading could mean something. 
(B) “THE BEATLE HOP” (2:15) 
[Baughn, Noel, Slay] More 
Beatlemania rock thoughts. 

SONNY CURTIS (Dimension 1024) 

9 “A BEATLE I WANT TO 
BE” (2:29) [Screen Gems- 
Columbia BMI — Curtis, Adler] 
There’s an infectious gayety to this 
salute to Beatlemania. It’s done-up in 
a good-natured funky manner by the 
songster and his guitar-led back-up 
sound. Could move. 

(B) “SO USED TO LOVING 

YOU” (1:52) [Screen Gems- 
Columbia BMI — Curtis] Teeners will 
enjoy listening to this understanding 
reading of a wistful item. 

THE NATURALS 
(Chattahoochee 633) 

9 “JUST IN CASE YOU 

CHANGE YOUR MIND” 
(2:05) [Conte-Chapman-Fowley BMI 
— Swanson] A sweet wistful is per- 
formed with a very appealing relaxed 
manner by the singer and his string- 
included ork-chorus backing. If the 
deck gets enough airtime, it could be 
a second hit for the diskery, which has 
the big item, “Popsicles & Icicles.” 

(B) “WHY DON’T THEY UN- 

DERSTAND” (2:14) [Hollis 
BMI — Henderson, Fishman] The tune, 
a better teen-market expression, has 
been around before. It’s done a la the 
top-half. 

JOHNNY CRAWFORD (Del-Fi 4229) 
9 “SANDY” (2:13) [American 

BMI — Fell] The young rock- 
ster hits upon a happy name-song, 
getting a bright combo-chorus stint 
for his back-up presentation. Could 
be a noise-maker for the artist, who’s 
done many click dates before. 

(B) “OL’ SHORTY” (2:50) [Van- 

guard BMI — Rice, Lewis] A 
sentimental narrative about a boy’s 
pet dog. 


10 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 






★ The Sales 

★ The 


THE SERENDIPITY 
SINGERS 

The Serendipity Singrers 

PHM 200^115! PHS 600-115 

The great new folk-pop group that 
everyone’s talking about! Terriffic 
hit on ABC-TV’s “Hootenanny” 
Show. 


BORN TO WANDER 

The 4 Seasons 

PHM 200-1291 PHS 600-129 

The #1 group in the country with 
a sound all their own! Unique ren- 
ditions of old and new folk rrjaterial 
that will conquer both the folk and 
pop fields! 


WOODY HERMAN -1964 

Woody Herman 

PHM 200-1 18/ PHS 600-118 

Selling faster than Woody’s two 
previous Philips albums. A driving, 
swinging hit that shows why 
Woody’s the talk of the big band 
world ! 


Cxcifement more sales history making lp’s 


ir All on the Bi;^ 
Philips Label 


Philips Connoisseur 
Collection Proudly Presents: 

Kennedy in Germany 

Narrated by ABC Newscaster Howard K. Smith 

A stirring momento of President 
Kennedy’s history-making tour of 
Germany. Complete with illus- 
trated brochure with photographs 
of the dramatic highlights of the 
tour and complete texts of all the 
speeches and comments. 




DIZZY GILLESPIE s 

THE DOUBLE ^ 
SIX OF PARIS 


DIZZY GILLESPIE 
AND THE DOUBLE SIX 

Dizzy Gillespie And The Double Six 

PHM 200-106! PHS 600-106 

The fabulous Diz and the unique 
Double Six of Paris — two of today’s 
top jazz acts! A sure fire hit if ever 
there was one! 


STILL GOING 
STRONG- 
STILL AT THE 
TOP OF THE 
CHARTS 



MOMENTS TO REMEMBER 


Teresa Brewer 

PHM 200-1 191 PHS 600-119 

Teresa’s new sound with more 
warmth and feeling than ever be- 
fore. Large, lush orchestra! backing! 



THE SINGING NUN 


Soeur Sourire 

PCC 203IPCC 603 

A legend in the industry. Will con- 
tinue to be one of the biggest sell- 
ing LP’S in recording history! 




ADIEU-EDITH PIAF 
(THE SPARROW) 

Edith Piaf PCC 208 

The original recordings transferred 
to LP without gimmicks or doctor- 
ing up! A Philips Connoisseur Col- 
lection release with line by line 
translations and sketches of Piaf’s 
life story. 


BACH’S GREATEST HITS 


The Swindle Singers 

PHM 200-097 1 PHS 600-097 


A unique jazz classic. A witty, 
catchy jazz treatment of the clas- 
sics that is still climbing the charts! 


bach's GRE.ATEST HITS 

J 'A'/O/E JAZZ 1 OCAL TREATMENT 
OF JOHAyy SEBA StlA S BACH 

BY THE CREtT/l E SR /yCl.E SIHGERS^ 


PHILIPS RECORDS 


ONE WORLD OF MUSIC 




ON ONE GREAT LABEL! 


] 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



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only those records best suited lor commercial use are reviewed by Cash Box 


7 





RONNIE VINCENT (FM 9002) 

• “MAKE ME HAPPY THIS 
WINTER” (2:08) [R.S.V.P. 

BMI — Palucci, Wright, Caldai-ella] 
Vincent’s bow on the FM label, now 
distributed by Roulette, sounds like a 
first-time-out winner. It’s a heartfelt 
pleader that moves along at a gallop- 
ing beat and multi-tracked in top 
notch style by Ronny. Strong ork- 
choral showcase on a deck to watch 
closely. 

(B-t-) “WHY DID YOU HAVE TO 
GO” (2:10) [Another BMI— 
Wright, Caldarella] More potent vocal 
and instrumental sounds on this fast 
moving folk-like affair. 


MAUREEN GRAY (Mercury 7227) 

Q “PM A HAPPY GIRL (LA- 
LA-LA)” (2:18) [Merjoda 
BMI — Madara, White] Newcomer 
Maureen Gray could make a name for 
herself with this commercial, chorus- 
backed freewheelin’ teen-oriented 
funky happy bluser with a contagious, 
highly-listenable beat. Watch it close- 
ly- 

(B-h) “GOOD-BYE BABY” (2:28) 
[Merjoda BMI — Madara, 
White] More fine blues sounds. This 
one’s a medium-paced, chorus-backed 
heart-breaker delivered with loads of 
verve. 


BILL PURSELL (Columbia 42970) 

• “THE THEME FROM CAP- 

TAIN NEWMAN” (Blue 
Grotto) (2:55) [Northern ASCAP] 
Pursell, the keyboard artist on awhile- 
back instrumental hit, “Our Winter 
Love,” offers a warm ivory stint — 
aerainst a lush full ork setting — on a 
very attractive ballad opus from the 
lick adaptation of the best-selling 
novel, “Captain Newman, M.D.” Sound 
could develop into a chart success. 
(B) “REMEMBER ME (I’m The 

One Who Loves You)” (2:28) 
[Voss ASCAP — Hamblen] Pretty 
stuff on a Stuart Hamblen country 
tune. 


LEE RAND (Diamond 159) 

• “STAGGER LEE” (2:14) 
[Travis BMI — Archibald, 
Price, Logan] The old Lloyd Price is 
back in rock town and kids will wel- 
come its presentation in a bang-up, 
party-time big-beat format. Strong 
•ittack to eye. 

(B) “YOU’RE A SONG WITHIN 
MY HEART” (2:23) [Hodon 
ASCAP — Stevens, Hosey, Gordon] 
The sentimental approach one expects 
from the title is realized in a spin for 
the session. 


THE DANLEERS (Smash 1872) 

• “IF” (i; 55 ) [Shapiro, Bern- 
stein ASCAP — Evans, Damer- 

eli, Hargreaves] The songsters, re- 
membered by teeners for their “One 
Summer Night” hit, could get back 
in the chart groove with this warm 
reading of the lovely oldtimer. There’s 
a lot to like here; could make it. 

(B) “WERE YOU THERE” 
(2:20) [Tate ASCAP— Rawls] 
Interesting rhythm bits from the 
combo in another teen-ballad ex- 
pression. 

JIMMY PETERSON (Chess 1886) 

• “MARIA” (2:23) [G. Schir- 
mer ASCAP — Bernstein, Sond- 
heim] Peterson and a striking ork- 
chorus backing offer an original in- 
terpretation of the oft-cut song from 
“West Side Story.” Approach could 
prove enough of a draw among teen- 
ers to give the sound a chart ride. 

(B) “INSIDE OF ME” (2:48) 

[West Bound BMI — Peterson, 
DeFrancesco] “Quiet” emotional essay 
from the artist. 


THE INITIALS (Congress 207) 

• “SCHOOL DAY” (2:23) 

[ARC BMI — Berry] The oldie, 
an unequivocal salute to the rock 
sound, gets bright new dress in this 
date by the songsters, who have a 
solid lead voice. Chorus cheers and the 
shuffle-beat combo add to the deck’s 
jubilant air. Could go over. 

(B) “THE SONG IS NUMBER 

ONE” (2:19) [Old Lyne 
BMI — Clark, Davie, Galligan] This is 
about a lost-love couple’s “our song.” 


LES COOPER (Dimension 1023) 

• “MOTOR CITY” (2:25) 
[Screen Gems — Columbia — 
BMI — Gordon, Coburn] Les “Wobble” 
Cooper and his ork lash out with a 
driving instrumental tagged “Motor 
City,” that’s a natural for the teen 
dance set. Melody is underplayed in 
favor of a good strong danceable beat. 
The kids might go for it in a big way. 
(B) “SWOB BEIN’” (2:20) 
[Screen Gems — BMI — Cooper] 
More dance rhythms by the crew in 
the same hard rock manner. 

ANDY DITTO (Joy 283) 

e “SOME OF THESE DAYS” 
(2:00) [Jerry Vogel— ASCAP 
— Brooks] Here’s an off-beat treat- 
ment of an old warhorse by Andy 
Ditto who wails, groans and whines 
his way throueh the tune in slow- 
paced fashion. It’s just far enough out 
to be in with some help from spinners 
with a sense of humor. 

(B+) “DAISY BELLE” (1:56) [Joli 
— BMI — Dio] Another spoof 
of the rock singers by the chanter 
who gives a hard-driving rendition of 
this fast-moving rocker. 


CHARLIE RICH (Groove 0032) 

© “LADY LOVE” (2:30) 
[Charles Rich — BMI — Rich] 

Charlie Rich can come thru on Groove 
with this pulsating vocal. The chanter, 
who also wrote the tune, dishes up a 
polished reading that’s sure to spark 
interest from the spinners and buyers. 
He’s got a big voice and uses it well. 
Watch it for early action. 

(B-I-) “WHY, OH WHY”(2:55) 
[Charles Rich — BMI — Rich] A 
ri^e easy-paced Nashville-flavored 
blues item on this end. Both sides 
were produced by Chet Atkins. This 
one could get a 'tion too. 


THE BUDDIES (Swan 4170) 

® “THE BT^.ATLE” (1:34> 

[Swagger BMI — Reynolds] 
The all-combo date, recognizing the 
success of The Beatles, is a sizzling, 
jazz-idea affair. Organ, percussions 
and saxes contribute the most color. 
(B) “ PULS EB EAT” (2:12) 

[Swagger BMI — Reynolds] 
The pulse of this portion beats in 
thumping rock fashion. 


THE CHARADES 
(Warner Bros. 5415) 

& “HE’S NOT YOUR BOY- 

FRIEND” (1:55) [T. M. BMI 
— Stone] There are a number of 
worthy sound touches to the rhythmic 
display from the larks and their 
combo combo. Catchy proceedings that 
could catch-on with the young set. 

(B) “HEY, OPERATOR” (2:06) 

[T.M. BMI — Resnick, Young] 
Gals maintain a similar bright atti- 
tude. 


liiiiilliliiiilil 


PEGGY LEE (Capitol 5121) 

(B-h) “A LOT OP LIVIN’ TO DO” 
(2:34) [Edwin H. Morris 
ASCAP — Adams, Strouse] The “Bye 
Bye Birdie” tune, bordering on ever- 
green territory, receives a bright pop- 
blues band arrangement, with the 
stylist managing to rise above the 
instrumental color. There’s plenty of 
airtime due this portion. 

(B) “I CAN’T STOP LOVING 
YOU” (3:03) [Acuff-Rose 
BMI — Gibson] Peggy does a some- 
what after-hours reading of the coun- 
try standard. 


THE APES (Mercury 72219) 

(B-h) “TARZAN’S MONKEY” 
(2:00) [Jandor & Emarcy 
ASCAP — Rosengarden, Krause] The 
instrumental crew and some zany 
Tarzan dialog add-up to a worthy 
novelty sound, which, of course, ties-in 
with a hot teen-dance gimmick. Could 
shape-up as a click cut. 

(B) “DON’T MONKEY WITH 
THE PONY” (2:26) [Jander 
& Emarcy ASCAP — Rosengarden, 
Krause] Cute title brings in two 
popular teen steps. Approach re- 
sembles the goings-on on the top-half. 


THE FRANK MOORE FOUR 

(Almo 202) 

(B-h) “SEVEN DAYS” (2:50) 
[Sands ASCAP — Moore, Karol, 
McGeehan] This lost-love performance 
is done by the blues songster in a 
Weavers’ “Old Smokey”-like arrange- 
ment with the chorus. Sound also re- 
flects some of Ray Charles’ modern- 
sounds-in-country-music offerings. 
Diskery is handled by A&M Records. 

(B) “LOOK HERE BABY” (2:20) 
[Sands ASCAP — Moore, 
Karol] Snappy blues date here. 


THE IMPALAS 
(20th Century Fox 428) 

(B+) “THERE IS NOTHIN’ LIKE 
A DAME” (2:06) [Williamson 
ASCAP — Rodgers & Hammerstein] 
The favorite from “South Pacific” 
gets a catchy middle-beat blues for- 
mat from the songsters. There isn’t 
much of the original quality in the 
tune left, but the sound has what the 
teeners will like. 

(B) “LAST NIGHT I SAW A 
GIRL” (1:52) [Gamut ASCAP 
— Levitan] More upbeat sounds from 
the songsters. 


LONESOME SUNDOWN 
(Excello 2242) 

(B+) “GUARDIAN ANGEL” (2:35) 
[Excellorec BMI — Green] The 
vet blues songster is in his usual high- 
ly-polished form on this traditional, 
siiuffle-beat moody easy-goin’ weeper 
with a moving, mid-deck recitation. 
Good bet for ops. 

(B) “I WANTA KNOW WHY” 
(2:39) [Excellorec BMI — 
Green] Uptempo, rhythmic happy 
bluser with a potent, multi-dance 
beat. 


OPALS (Okeh 7188) 

(B+) “DOES IT MATTER” (2:49) 
[Curtom-Jalynne BMI — But- 
ler] The Opals should garner some 
immediate airplay reaction with this 
top-drawer, full ork-backed pop-r&b 
lament with an exciting, danceable re- 
peating riff. Sleeper potential. 

(B-t-) “TENDER LOVE” (2:31) 
[Sea Jack BMI— McGill, Alli- 
son] Hard-driving shufflin’ weeper 
with a nostalgic years-back sound. 


HAROLD VICK (Blue Note 1897) 

(B-h) “OUR MISS BROOKS” (2:45) ^ 

[Fred Norsworthy BMI — 
Vick] Harold Vick and his instru- 
mental jazz friends could create some 
excitement with this funky, medium- 
paced bluser obviously inspired by the 
old Eve Arden radio personality. 
Plenty of potential. u 

(B) “VICKSVILLE” (3:00) !, 

[Groove BMI — Vick] On this f 
end the crew dishes-up an appealing I 
midstream ballad with a contagious T 
low-key repeating riff. 1 


LA VERA JOHNSON (Julie 603) [ 

(B-t-) “CALL MY NAME” (2:12) | 
[Templer — BMI — Abbott, \ 
Beckett] LaVera Johnson comes up 
with a smooth and feelingful reading 
of this country-blues style item that 
has both pop and country appeal. A ^ 
pleasant melody coupled with an easy- ' 
listening arrangement makes for top 
listening. Side could get territorial 
action. 

(B) “I WANT TO LOVE YOU” 
(2:18) [Harmes — BMI — Hor- 
ton, Johnson] A straight blues offer- 
ing here. 


THE BEATLETTES (Assault 1893) ( 

(B-h) “YES! YOU CAN HOLD MY 
HAND” (2:20) [NT— BMI— 
Gallo] The Beatlettes reply to the 
Beatles that hand-holding is per- 
mitted. Although the melody is very 
similar, the gals give it plenty of 
exuberance. If the spinners like it 
they might cash in on Beatlemania. 

(B) “YES! YOU CAN HOLD MY '‘i 
HAND (INSTRUMENTAL)” 
(2:20) [NT— BMI— Gallo] Same tune i 
minus the words. 


THE FRONTIERS (Philips 40148) 

(B-h) “THE FRONTIERS” (Philips 

40148) [Sylvia — BMI — Davis] ■ 
The Frontiers make a strong bid for 
teen acceptance with this second I 
stanza on Philips. It’s an easy-paced 
rhythm ballad aimed at romance. The 
lead singer shows plenty of strength. 
Lots of potential here. 

(B) “I JUST WANT YOU” (2:33) 
[Sylvia — BMI — Davis, Koob] 

A similarly styled item on the under- 
cut with another flavorful solo by the 
lead. 


ED MONTGOMERY (Initial 4512) 

(B) “MICHAEL ROW THE BOAT 

ASHORE” (2:02) [Boma— 
ASCAP — Trad] This evergreen folk 
tune gets a big production treatment 
via Ed Montgomery with lots of voices 
and full ork. A strong gospel flavor is 
gotten from tambourines and hallelu- 
jahs. Good entry for soft-program- 
ming stations. 

(B) “BRAZIL” (2:34) [Southern 

— BMI — Barrosa] A big 

arrangement for this oldie also very 
suitable for the soft music stations. 


AL ALLEN (Unical 3012) 

(B-h) “SCARLET O’HARA” (2:30) 
[Regent — BMI — Lordon] A1 
Allen’s group comes up with a flavor- 
ful instrumental opus here that’s 
reminiscent of the while-back “Tel- 
star” side by the Tornadoes. The 
arrangement is inventive and is 
sparked by clicking castanets. A good 
melody is the strong point here. 

(B) “GIVE IN TO LOVE” (2:20) 
[Lenmar — BMI — Allen, Col- 
ley] A pleasant sounding rock and 
roll instrumental with some happy 
handclapping. 


12 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 




GOLDEN NEWIES FROM 



Pm 







ALREADY ON THE TRADE CHARTS 


wi 


scott english 

HIGH ON A HILL 


1 ?^ 

I 



W/LL BE AS BIG AS %OUIE LOUIE' 


gino Washington 

OUT OF THIS WORLD 



WAND 147 


SIMPLY GREAT! 


ed bruce 

WORKING MAN'S PRAYER 


WAND 148 ^ 



BIG DETROIT HIT! 


j. j. barnes 

JUST ONE MORE TIME 


SCEPTER 1266 


OUT TODAY, HIS LATEST SMASH! 


chuck Jackson 

HAND IT OVER «nd 
LOOK OVER YOUR SHOULDER 









Gash Box— FebrOory^T 5,; 1564 







Box 





RECORD REVIEWS 

• best bet B+ very good B good C+ fair C mediocre 

only those records best suited for commercial use are reviewed by Cash Box 


THE PLAYMATES 
(ABC-Paramount 10522) 

(B-f) “THE ONLY ONLY LEFT 
ON THE CORNER” (2:23) 
[April ASCAP — White, Snyder, Ku- 
sik] A tune that serves as a teen an- 
swer to “(Wedding Bells Are Break- 
ing Up) That Old Gang Of Mine” is 
done with a good-sounding teen ar- 
rangement, featuring the vet teen- 
market song crew. There’ll be Top 40 
time reserved for this outing, 

(B) “THE GUY BEHIND THE 
WHEEL” (2:12) [Apt AS- 
CAP — Vance, Snyder] Dramatic mod- 
ern-day folkish sickie. 


THE BUTTONS (Ember 1100) 

(B+) “ABSENCE MAKES THE 
HEART GROW FONDER” 
(2:14) [Amano & Flora BMI — Venet] 
The old adage is applied to a wistful 
teen tune, which gets a touching sad 
martial-beat sound. Gals have an in- 
teresting blend. Deck could make some 
headway with the kids. 

(B) “HUCKLEBERRY FINN” 
(2:04) [Amano & Flora BMI 
— Venet, Sanders, Mason] Hard-beat 
shuffle-beat doings in a manner asso- 
ciated with The Ronettes. 


CARL HOLMES & COMMANDERS 
(Parkway 900) 

(B-b) “I WANT MY YA YA” (2:08) 
[Adato — BMI — Holmes, Dray- 
ton] Carl Holmes & the Commanders, 
a slick rock group that’s been on the 
scene for some time, lash out with a 
fast & furious treatment of this 
danceable item aimed at teen ap- 
proval. It’s a rapid-fire vocal-instru- 
mental offering that should see sales 
and spins. 

(B) “I’M AT MY BEST” (2:20) 
[Adato — BMI — Holmes, Dray- 
ton] The gang modulates things a bit 
for this rhythmic item about a guy 
who’s at his best when he’s down. 


PAUL BRYANT (Fantasy 576) 

(B-b) “WHY ME?” (2:57) [Cireco 
BMI — Bryant] Paul Bryant 
and a fine crew of jazzmen offer an 
extremely interesting low-key instru- 
mental stanza in a moody after-hours 
jazz vein. Side boasts some effective 
chromatic progressions. 

(B) “SISTER LOVIE” (2:21) 
[Cireco BMI — Kirkwood, 
Allen] Hard-driving, uptempo jazz 
instrumental with a warm happy-go- 
lucky fiavor. 


JOHN D. LOUDERMILK 
(RCA Victor 8308) 

(B-b) “BLUE TRAIN” (Of The 
Heartbreak Line)” (2:19) 
[Acuff-Rose BMI — Loudermilk] The 
performer-writer heads-up a fine blues 
stand with a choo-choo format, with 
a funky harmonica playing the role 
of a train-whistle. Effective sound for 
pop-country exposure. 

(B) “RHYTHM & BLUES” (2:11) 
[Acuff-Rose BMI — Louder- 
milk] The funky harmonica also ap- 
pears in this bouncy all-combo blueser. 


BUDDY EBSEN (MGM 13210) 

(B-b) “MAIL ORDER BRIDE” 
(2:20) [Leo Feist ASCAP— 
Bassman, Ebsen] Star of TV’s 
“Beverly Hillbillies” heads-up a read- 
ing of an engaging pop hillbilly item 
from a pic of the same name. A sound 
that should he getting all-around radio 
station airtime. 


(B) “BALLAD OF JED 
PETT” (1:52) [Cai 
BMI — Henning] The TV’er 
theme song. 


FONTELLA BASS (Sonja 2006) 

(B-b) “THIS WOULD MAKE ME 
HAPPY” [Placid-Olsa BMI— 
Sain] Fontella Bass makes an urgent, 
moving, shuffle-beat plea for things to 
work out for the better on this top- 
notch, funky blueser with a warm 
while-back sound. A natural for air- 
play. 

(B-b) “POOR LITTLE FOOL” 
[Placid-Olsa BMI— Sain] Me- 
dium-paced, rockin’ uptempo affair in 
which the lark proclaims some of her 
past mistakes in the romance dept. 


CHARLES BROWN (King 5852) 

(B-b) “BLOW OUT ALL THE 
CANDLES” (2:10) [Lois BMI 
— Summers, Zirkel] The vet r&b song- 
ster unleashes his potent, wide-range 
vocal talents full-blast on this swingin’ 
funky teen-angled multi-dance tale of 
heartbreak. Could create a stir. 

(B) “COME HOME” (2:20) [J&C 
BMI — Johnson] Slow-moving, 
shuffle-beat, tradition-styled blues 
lament rendered with feeling by 
Brown. 


HOLLYWOOD HURRICANES 
(Prima 1009) 


(B-b) “HAVE LOVE, WILl 
TRAVEL” (2:35) [Lima: 
BMI— Berry] The Louis Prima labe 
could receive good teen attention witl 
this whacky novelty attack. All sort 
of vocal fun, including chants an( 
shouts, crop-up. 


(B) “BEAVERSHOT” (2:30) 
[K&L ASCAP — Hollywood 
Hurricanes] An all-instrumental at- 
tack of pro teen merit. 


IKE & TINA TURNER (Sonja 2005) 

(B-b) “YOU CAN’T MISS NOTH- 
ING THAT YOU NEVER 
HAD” (2:04) [Placid BMI— Turner] 
The vet r&b singers could create a 
sales stir with this top-flight medium- 
paced tear-jerker with a commercial 
rhythmic, teen-angled beat. Eye it. 

(B-b) “GOD GAVE ME YOU” 
(2:15) [Placid BMI — Turner] 
Slow-moving, tradition-oriented shuf- 
fle-beat lament read by the duo with 
their usual poise and artistry. 


JIMMY JORDAN (20th Century 436) 

(B-b) “THE SAME KIND OF 
GIRL” (2:17) [January BMI 
— Field] That big-sounding rock for- 
mat is the strong format of this out- 
ing by the songster, whose opus tells 
of a guy who envies his friend’s flame. 
Fine rock-a-string arrangement. Date 
might step-out. 

(B) “WHERE WERE YOU, 
CINDY LOU” (2:19) [Bee- 
Cee-Dee BMI — Gertz] This stint is 
also a big production arrangement, 
but with a greater emphasis on 
rhythm. 


THE RELATIVES (Almont 306) 

(B-b) “NEVER WILL I LOVE 
AGAIN” (2:26) [Footlight & 
Edlock BMI — Fleming, Edwards] 
There’s a touch of years-back teen- 
ballad blends here, but the session 
is sure to reach the hearts of many 
a teener. Sound will stand-up very 
well at romantic dance-time segs. 

(B) “I’M JUST LOOKING FOR 
LOVE” (2:11) [Footlight & 
Wellmade BMI — Fleming, Edwards] 
Good back-beat and swirling organ 
sounds highlight this rhythmic blues- 
styled stand by the guys. 


DICK JACOBS CHORUS-ORCH. 
(Bz'unswick 55261) 

(B) “DRAG RACE” (2:04) [Mer- 
rimac BMI — Michaels, Tarno- 
pol, Wilson] This is effective hot-rod 
rockin’ from the Jacobs’ ensembles, 
the chorus section of which chants 
along with the colorful instrumental 
scoring. There’s a chance that ex- 
posure could include semi-rock radio 
outlets. 

(B) “BLUEBERRY HILL” (2:31) 
[Chappell ASCAP — Lewis, 

Stock, Rose] The old standard receives 
a relaxed down-Nashville-way read- 
ing. 


THE LAURIE JOHNSON ORCHES- 
TRA (Colpix 723) 

(B) “THE THEME FROM DR. 

STRANGELOVE” (2:17) 
[Screen Gems-Columbia BMI — John- 
son] Top theme from the flick satire- 
travesty is the old favorite, “When 
Johnny Comes Marching Home,” done 
with a lusty martial air by the John- 
son ork-chorus. 

(B) “LOVE THAT BOMB” (1:41) 
[Colgems ASCAP — Carter, 

DeWitt] Rockin’ novelty inspired by 
the flick, whose sub-title is “How I 
Learned to Stop Worrying and Love 
the Bomb.” 


THE KIDS FROM OLIVER 
(Smash 1873) 

(B) “POP GO THE BUTTONS” 
(2:34) Sea-Lark Ent. BMI — 
Sachs, Mandel, Berkhmans, Pergaud] 
The youngsters who perform in 
“Oliver!” offer a spirited reading of a 
march item from the acclaimed 
French flick, “Pop Go the Buttons.” 
Tempo should delight moppet ears. 

(B) “POPEYE’S BIRTHDAY 
SONG” (2:05) [Arch & Fea- 
tures ASCAP — Green, Tripp] The 
voice of “Popeye” is heard in another 
cheerful cut for kiddies. 


CHICK FINNEY (Chick’s 100) 

(B+) “I WANT A MAN LIKE 
THAT” [Chic-Finn-BMI— Lu- 
Tour, Finney] Songstress Loyce Pick- 
ens lashes out with a Dixie-styled 
blues reading about her ideal man. 
The Chick Finney Combo provides 
some effective blues backing New 
Orleans style. 

(B) “IT’S BEST TO PLAY IT 
COOL” [Chic-Finn-BMI— Fin- 
ney] More blues on this end but the 
tempo picks up and the lark is joined 
by Jimmy Atkins on the vocal. 


PETE DRAKE (Smash 1867) 

(B-b) “FOREVER” (2:37) [Tree 
BMI — Killen] One of the pret- 
tier tunes from the oldies-but-goodies 
catalog is invitingly styled by the steel 
guitarist and a relaxed ork-chorus. 
Sound serves as a fine adult-audience 
rendition of the tune. 

(B) “SLEEP WALK” (2:20) 
[Trinity & Climax BMI — Far- 
rina, Farrina] Same comments apply 
to this old hit by Santo & Johnny. 


BILLY STRANGE (Crescendo 309) 

(B-b) “CHARADE” (1:35) [South- 
dale & Northern ASCAP — 
Mancini, Mercer] Diskery has culled 
a timely, change-of-pace reading of 
the current success from an LP’ “Mr. 
Guitar.” Approach is exciting and 
jazz-oriented. There can be important 
dee jay attention this way. 

(B) “WHERE BABY’S GONE” 
(2:35) [Neil BMI— Strange] 
The same album also includes this 
bluesy romp. 


THE JOYS (Valiant 6042) 

(B-b) “I STILL LOVE HIM” (2:29) 
[Vine St. & Wedgewood 
ASCAP — Cole, Cross] Gals are sure- 
fire teen-pleasers with this intriguing 
Shirelles-type semi-dramatic outing. 
Their backing is a first-rate attention- 
getter. Could move. 

(B) “(Singing Along with) I 
STILL LOVE HIM” (2:29) 
[Vine St. & Dedgewood ASCAP — 
Cole, Cross] That solid back-up sound 
on the top-half is heard here. 


SERENADERS (V.I.P. 25002) 

(B-b) “IF YOUR HEART SAYS 
YES” (2:45) [Jobete BMI— 
Kerr, Barnes] The new diskery, 
handled by the Tamla-Motown set-up, 
offers a fine brisk-beat session featur- 
ing The Serenaders, a polished blues- 
styled song crew. Kids might go for 
this active sound. 

(B) “I’LL CRY TOMORROW” 
(2:30) [Jobete BMI — Kerr, 
Barnes] A softie expression by the 
team. 


TIMMI BROWN (Mercury 72226) 

(B-b) “RUNNIN’ LATE” (2:10) 
[Merjoda BMI — Madara, 
White] The football star is caught-up 
in a colorful folk-blues cut for teen 
consumption. With this outing. Brown 
could extend his talents to the teen 
charts. 

(B) “IF I LOVED YOU” (2:22) 
[Williamson ASCAP-Rodgers 
& Hammerstein] This bright shuffle- 
beat reading of the evergreen is meant 
only for teen ears. 


NELL McBRIDE (Decca 31572) 

(B) “YOURS FOREVER” (2:37) 
[Yonah BMI — Stephens, Hed- 
den] Lark nicely cuddles the pleasing 
sentimental. Relaxed combo-femme 
chorus backdrop has a hint of the 
teen-beat. 

(B) “OLD ENOUGH” (2:33) 
[Yonah BMI — Anderson] 

More well-defined teen-minded ex- 
pression. 


PRINCE JEFFERIES 
(Old Town 1157) 

(B) “SO GOOD” (2:05) [Mau- 
reen BMI — Height, Bailey] 
The warbler has some of the style of 
Sam Cooke. He’s heard in a good- 
feel blues outing, with a hard-beat 
shuffle sound in support. Should find 
a good reception from the blues-rock 
market. 

(B) “THE APE” (2:05) [Maureen 
BMI — Height, Bailey] A sly 
blueser about a new step. 


DAVID ROSE ORCH. (MGM 13211) 

(B-b) “THE GRASSHOPPER (El 
Cigarron)” (2:26) [Hill & 
Range BMI — Blanco] Charming 
south-of-the-border melody recives an 
engaging merengue sound from the 
vet maestro’s ork. Fits fun program- 
ming to a T. Could move. 

(B) “BIRD BRAIN” (2:05) 
[East Hill ASCAP — Mancini] 
This is a frisky Henry Mancini crea- 
tion for the flick, “Soldier in the 
Rain.” 


VICKI BELMONTE (Felsted 8695) 

(B-b) “THE KING PIN” (1:50) 
[Beatrice ASCAP — Dar- 
manin, Shiff] Young (16) thrush 
heads-up a bright romantic-novelty 
session. Catchy rock-market proceed- 
ings that could get around. 

(B) “THERE GOES MY 
HEART” (2:15) [Leo Feist 
ASCAP — Davis, Silver] Male chorus 
opens this nice reading of the sturdy. 


14 


Cosh Box — February 15, 1964 



FROM ANY PERSPECTIVE 
BUD & TRAVIS’ FINEST ALBUM YET’^ 







LRP-3341/LST-7341 


Maria Cristina; Abilene; Fiesta In Guadalajara; I Never Will Marry; iAy! Jalisco; Tomorrow Is A 
Long Time; Coin’ To California; So Long, Stay Well; Take Off Your Old Coat; Two Brothers; 
Sabras Que Te Quiero; A Long Time Back; Ay, Maria. 


★ 


QUITE A STATEMENT, CONSIDERING THESE OUTSTANDING BUD & TRAVIS LP’S: 



BUD & TRAVIS IN CONCERT 
LDM-11001/LDS-12001 
An all-time bargain! Complete 
concert- 2 IP’s, only 4.98 
(sugg. retail) 


BUD & TRAVIS -NATURALLY 
LRP-3295/LST-7295 


SPOTLIGHT ON BUD & TRAVIS 
LRP-3138/LST-7138 



BUD & TRAVIS 
LRP-3125/LST-7125 


LIBERTY RECORDS 




Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



LOOKING AHEAD 



A compilation, in order of strength, of up and coming records showing signs of breoking into The Cash Box Top 100. List is compiled from retail outlets. 


1 

KISSIN' COUSINS 

13 

GREASY SPOON 

1 

Elvis Presley (RCA Victor S307) 

Hank Morr (Federal 12508) 

2 

I'LL MAKE YOU MINE 

Bobby Vee (Liberty 55670) 

14 

TOUS LES CHEMINS 

Soeur Sourire (Philips 40165) 



15 

I'M WATCHING (EVERY LITTLE 

7 

TELL ME BABY 

MOVE YOU MAKE) 

O 

Garnet Mimms (United Artists 694) 


Little Peggy March (RCA Victor 8302) 

4 

HELLO DOLLY 

Louis Armstrong (Kapp 573) 

16 

HE WALKS LIKE A MAN 

Jodi Miller (Capitol 5090) 



17 

DEEP IN THE HEART 

5 

THE LA-DEE-DA SONG 

OF HARLEM 


Village Stampers (Epic 9655) 


Clyde McPhatter (Mercury 72220) 

6 

SNEAKY SUE 

Patty Lace & Petticoats (Kapp 563) 

18 

OUT OF THIS WORLD 

Gina Washington (Wand 147) 



19 

STRANGE THINGS ARE 

7 

1 CAN'T STAND IT 

HAPPENING 


Soul Sisters (Sue 799) 


Little Jr. Parker (Duke 371) 

8 

TELL HIM 

Drew-Vells (Capitol SS05) 

20 

SCATTER SHIELD 

Surfaris (Decca 31581) 



21 

I'M TRAVELIN' ON 

o 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 

Jackie Wilson (Brunswick 55260) 

✓ 

Lefty Frizell (Columbia 42924) 

22 

PLEASE DON'T GO AWAY 

Johnny Tillotson (MGM 13193) 

10 

HERE'S A HEART 

Diplomats (Arock 1004) 

23 

ALL MY TRIALS 

Dick & Deedee (Warner Bros. 5411) 

11 

DON'T CROSS OVER 

Linda Brannon (Epic 9640) 

24 

BE MY GIRL 

Dovells (Parkway 901) 

12 

NADINE 

25 

TRUE LOVE GOES ON AND ON 

Chuck Berry (Chess 1883) 

Burl Ives (Decca 31571) 



26 

IT AIN'T NO USE 

Lou Johnson (Hilltop 551) 

39 

1 ADORE YOU 

Patti Page (Columbia 42963) 

27 

MOLLY 

Eddy Arnold (RCA 8296) 

40 

BLUE MOON 

Ray Canniff (Columbia 42967) 

28 

1 CAN'T WAIT TO SEE MY 
BABY/WHO'S GOING TO 

TAKE CARE OF ME 

Baby Washington (Sue 797) 

41 

I'M LEAVING 

Jahnny Nash (Groove 550030) 

29 

THROUGH THE EYES OF 

A FOOL 

Roy Clark (Capitol 5099) 

42 

1 AM WOMAN/PEOPLE 

Barbra Streisand (Columbia 42965) 

30 

THINK NOTHING ABOUT IT 

Gene Chandler (Constellation 112) 

43 

BLUE TRAIN 

John Loudermilk (RCA Victor 8308) 

31 

ON AND ON 

Jerry Vole (Columbia 42951) 

44 

BEYOND THE SEA 

Reveres (Jubilee 5463) 

32 

NEVER LEAVE ME 

Stratfords (O'Dell 100) 

45 

DARK AS A DUNGEON 

Johnny Cash (Columbia 42964) 

33 

GOING BACK TO LOUISIANA 

Bruce Chanel (LeCom 122) 

46 

WHITE ON WHITE 

Danny Williams (United Artists 685) 

34 

35 

LOOK HOMEWARD ANGEL 

Monarchs (Sound Stage 7 2516) 

CUSTOM MACHINE 

Bruce & Terry (Columbia 42956) 

47 

BLUE SKIES 

Jack Scott (Groove 0031) 

36 

HE REALLY LOVES ME 

Debbie Rollins (Ascot 2148) 

48 

HEY JEAN, HEY DEAN 

Dean & Jean (Rust 5075) 

37 

WHAT NOW MY LOVE 

Ben E. King (Atco 6284) 

49 

GO NOW 

Bessie Banks (Tiger 102) 

38 

MO ONIONS 

Booker T. & MG's (Stax 142) 

50 

SWEET VIOLETS 

Bobby Braun (Fraternity 919) 



JAMIE GUYDEN WELCOMES . . . 

MAJOR BILL SMITH AND HIS LECAM RECORD LABEL 


u 


JAMIE/GUYDEN DISTRIBUTING CORP. Philadelphia 21 Pennsylvania 


Cash Box- — February 15, 1964 




While everybody was fighting 
over who owns the Beatles, 
the Searchers passed them on 
the English charts, old boy! 




THE SEARCHERS 

"NEEDLES ' 
AND PINS” 


K-577-> 


No. 1 in Britain according to The Record Retailer and Music Industry News, January 30, 1964. 


Cosh Box— February 15, 1964 



“NADINr 

Chuck Berry 


^ “LOVE WALKED 
RIGHT OUT ON ME 

s, Ty Hunter 


“SAVE A 
LITTLE 
MONKEY” 

The Corsairs 


EVERYONE 

KNOWS” 

Bohhy Charles 


Jewel 728 


Checker 1067 


Producing Company 



mox 


•■A 

9 


PLATTER 

SPINNER 

PATTER 


WNJR-Newark recently concluded 
a “Mystery Voices” contest and drew 
the heaviest deluge of mail in many 
years according to operations man- 
ager Bob Leonard. Listeners were 
asked to identify five well-known 
personalities and their voices were 
played numerous times throughout the 
broadcast day. Mail poured into the 
outlet from all over the New York- 
New Jersey area as listeners tried 
to identify the five voices and walk 
off with the first prize ... a brand 
new TV-Radio-Phono combination 
valued at $510.00. Ten runner-up win- 
ners consoled themselves with tran- 
sistor radios. The five “Mystery 
Voices” turned out to be: Diahann 
Carol, Roy Wilkins, Nancy Wilson, 
Jackie Robinson and Archie Moore. 
Clues were added as the contest prog- 
ressed which helped listeners match 
the voices with the correct personal- 
ities. 

The Jane Addams Memorial Fund 
is the subject for an intensive spot 
campaign currently running on WLS- 
Chicago. Public affairs director, Don 
Stewart, has custom-produced a series 
of spot announcements using the 
voices of community leaders urging 
contributions to restore Hull House. 
The spots will run eight or more time 
daily through Feb. 22, and will be 
incorporated also into some twenty 
newscasts per day through Feb. 7. 

KCOP-TV-Los Angeles has given 
$100,000 to Community TV of South- 
ern California to help set up the first 
ETV station in this area — slated 
to go on the air in September called 
KCET. Last month KCET, which will 
operate on channel 28, was awarded a 
$468,790 grant from the Dept, of 
Health, Education and Welfare; 
earlier, CBS-TV, NBC-TV, and Metro- 
media each put up $250,000 for the 
ETV. Last week the FTC gave KCET 
the go-ahead to build a transmitter on 
Mount Wilson, where all Los Angeles 
TV stations have their antennas. 

A 39.9-mile hike from downtown 
Akron to Cleveland’s public square 
in 20-degree weather by KWY-Cleve- 
land deejay Jim Stagg recently en- 
riched the Cleveland chapter of the 
March of Dimes at the rate of al- 
most $23 per mile. Final tabulations 
released by the station showed list- 
eners had pledged $7,262.34 and Stagg 
has personally collected $842.24 dur- 
ing his 14-hour, four-minute and 15- 
second walk for a total of $9,114.58. 

Stagg walked only when pledges 
were coming in on at least one of 
the 11 telephone lines set up for the 
day at March of Dimes headquarters. 
When no pledges were coming in, 
Stagg stopped walking and a horn 
went off in the KYW studios, 
informing listeners that more pledges 
were needed. Pledges were received 
from such far-distant points as Pom- 
pano Beach, Florida and Huntsville, 
Alabama, during the day. Stagg, ac- 
companied by some 150 persons, in- 
cluding 100 students from nearby 
Fenn College, who had marched the 
final two miles with him, was greeted 
by a delegation of nearly 200 frozen 
fans when he reached public square 
at approximately 8:45 PM. Three of 
the police cars assigned to escort him 
didn’t fare as well. They broke down 
along the way and had to be replaced. 

Plans are now under way for the 
formation of a Canada Centennial 
Network, to operate during Canada’s 
Centennial year . . , 1967. One sta- 
tion in each of the ten provinces will 
be selected to prepare a weekly five 
minute program on that province’s 
Centennial activities. This program 
will be fed to the other nine affiliates 
across Canada, and in return, each 
member will receive similar reports 
from all other provinces. Plans are 
also in the works for sale of this 
series of interested stations outside 
Canada. At the moment, affiliations 


are being set up in six of the ten 
provinces, with the four far eastern 
provinces . . . New Brunswick, Nova 
Scotia, Prince Edward Island and 
Newfoundland . . . the only ones 
which are not yet represented. Plans 
call for the release of a special 
record album across Canada at the 
end of 1967, containing the actual 
voices of those who make Centennial 
new during that year. CKY-Winnipeg, 
the founding station of the Canada 
Centennial Network, feels that this 
venture will help make Canadians 
more aware of activities in their 
country, and will help to make 1967 
the biggest year for tourism in 
Canada’s history. 

The prime feature of a hootenanny 
is singing along. So WJRZ-Newark’s 
folk music buff, Jerry White is trying 
to satisfy everyone’s desire to sing 
along. He’s begun a “Sing A Song” 
based on the new Kingston Trio Capi- 
tol LP on which the trio plays the 
accompaniment to many of their 
famous songs. The idea is that list- 
eners write in and say which song 
they would like to “Sing A Song” 
along with the Kingston Trio. Jerry 
will pick twenty five winners who will 
then come to the WJRZ studios in 
Newark and tape their “Sing A Song’' 
with the group. Response to the 
idea has been overwhelming. There 
seem to be quite a number of undis- 
covered folksingers in Northern New 
Jersey just waiting for the chance 
to be heard. 

KSYN Syndicated Radio, for four- 
teen years one of the leading pro- 
ducers of taped shows for program- 
mdng, is expanding their operations 
and moving to Las Vegas, Nevada 
effective Feb. 15, 1964 it was an- 
nounced last week by Shane Wilder, 
one of KSYN’s top platter spinners. 
With the move to Las Vegas, KSYN 
is planning four new shows in addi- 
tion to the eight already enjoying 
top ratings, which are carried into 
thirty-eight markets. The last ten 
years has shown great gains in taped 
shows for programming and KSYN 
expects to handle some of the pro- 
gramming needs of more stations in 
the months to come. 

KFJZ-Fort Worth has proclaimed 
Feb. as “National Sneakers Month.” 
To celebrate, the station will give 
away a pair of sneakers everyday 
during the month to some lucky 
listener. To top this nutty promotion, 
the station will hide the “Golden 
Sneaker” and give clues as to its 
whereabouts everyday on the air. The 
first person to guess where the Golden 
Sneaker is hidden will win $200 plus 
a wrist watch and last but not least 
... a pair of sneakers . . . and when 
they guess where the Golden Sneaker 
is, they come to the KFJZ studios 
and try on the hidden Golden Sneaker. 
And if the shoe fits they will be 
awarded a bonus of 125,000 trading 
stamps. 

A recent W ABC-New York contest 
offered a 7% ton prize to the charity 
or institution that could present in 
77 words or less the most valid rea- 
son for needing a bus. More than 
two thousand entries were received 
from schools, churches and community 
groups all over the East. The win- 
ning organization was the Cerebral 
Palsy School serving Nassau County. 
The 33-foot bus, formerly used by 
WABC as a mobile remote studio, 
is fully carpeted and air-conditioned 
and one side lets down for trans- 
porting children confined to wheel- 
chairs. 

VITAL STATISTICS: 

Robin Walker exits his air spot 
on WOHO-Toledo to assume similiar 
duties on WJBK-Detroit. . . . David 
McNamee, formerly with WLEE- 
Richmond, is now with WTRY-Al- 
bany. . . . Merlin Simundson given 
the green light as station manager 
of WMIN-Minneapolis. 


18 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 




The Jones to keep up with 

is 



Cash Box— February 15^ 1964 


19 






CcuA T^x 


RADIO ACTIVE i 
CHART 


A survey of key radio stations in all important markets throughout the country to determine by percentage of those 
reporting which releases are being added to station play lists this week for the first time and also the degree of con- 
centration combining previous reports. Percentage figures on left indicate how many of the stations reporting this 
week have added the following titles to their play list for the first time. Percentage figures on right include total 
from left plus the percentage title received in prior week or weeks. (SURVEY COMPLETED TO FEB. 5TH) 


I 


7 


% OF STATIONS 
ADDING TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 

THIS WEEK 

title artist label 

TOTAL % OF 
STATIONS TO HAVE 
ADDED TITLES TO 
PROG. SCHED. 

TO DATE 

58% 

Blue Winter — Connie Francis — MGM 

58% 

50% 

Fun, Fun, Fun — Beach Boys — Capitol 

50% 

49% 

My True Carrie Love — Nat Cole — Capitol 

49% 

33% 

Please, Please Me — Beatles — Vee Jay 

40% 

30% 

Hey Jean, Hey Dean — Dean & Jean — Rost 

30% 

29% 

Bird Dance Beat — Trashmen — Garrett 

29% 

29% 

My Boyfriend Got A Beatle Haircut — Donna Lynn — Capitol 

37% 

29% 

Willyam, Willyam — Dee Dee Sharp — Cameo 

37% 

28% 

See The Funny Little Clown — Bobby Goldsboro — United Artists 

52% 

27% 

Worried Guy — Johnny Tillotson — MGM 

27% 

26% 

California Sun — Rivieras — Riviera 

77% 

26% 

Stay — Four Seasons — Vee Jay 

26% 

25% 

Don’t Cross Over — Linda Brannon — Epic 

25% 

25% 

Winter’s Here — Robin Ward — Dot 

25% 

24% 

Live Wire — Martha & Vandellas — Gordy 

54% 

23% 

Be My Girl — Dovells— '^Parkway 

23% 

21 % 

Forever — Peter Drake — Smash 

21% 

21 % 

Hello Dolly — Louis Armstrong — Kapp 

30% 

21 % 

The Boy With The Beatle Hair — Swans — Cameo 

21% 

20% 

Tell Me Baby — Garnett Mimms — United Artists 

20% 

19% 

Good News — Sam Cooke — RCA Victor 

68% 

18% 

La Bomba — Les Brown — Columbia 

18% 

17% 

Rented Tuxedo^— H. B. Barnum — Imperial 

17% 

17% 

1 Wish You Love — Gloria Lynne — Everest 

36% 

16% 

I’m Looking Over A Four Leaf Clover — Wayne Newton — 

Capitol 

16% 

15% 

I’m Travelin’ On— Jackie Wilson — Brunswick 

22% 

14% 

Oh Baby Don’t You Weep— James Brown — King 

59% 

14% 

Midnight — David Rockingham Trio — Josie 

14% 

13% 

All My Trials — Dick & Dee Dee — Warner Bros. 

34% 

12% 

Dawn — Four Seasons — Philips 

80% 

12% 

Permanently Lonely — Timi Yuro — Liberty 

12% 

11 % 

Glad All Over— Dave Clark Five — Epic 

11% 

10% 

That Girl From Spanish Town — Marty Robbins — Columbia 

10% 


LESS THAN 10% BUT MORE THAN 5% 



TOTAL % 
TO DATE 


TOTAL % 
TO DATE 


TOTAL % 
TO DATE 

A LeHer From Sherry 

Dale Ward (Dot) 

52% 

Rip Von Winkle 

Devotions (Roulette) 

36% 

Miller's Cave 

Bobby Bare (RCA Victor) 

54% 

Understand Your Man 
Johnny Cash (Columbia) 

9% 

Leaving Here 

Eddie Holland (Motown) 

8% 

Who Do You Love 

Sapphires (Swan) 

6% 

Going, Going, Gone 

Brook Benton (Mercury) 

80% 

1 Only Wont To Be With You 
Dusty Springfield (Philips) 

23% 

Navy Blue 

Diane Renay (20th Fox) 

49% 

He Really Loves Me 

Debbie Rollins (Ascot) 

8% 

I'll Make You Mine 

Bobby Vee (Liberty) 

7 % 

Abigail Beecher 

Freddy Cannon (Warner Bros.) 72% 


-A 





20 


Ca^h Bdx-^Febroory 1 5^ 1964 


CLASSICAL 


Let's face it. 

Not every one of these 
new Kapp releases will earn 
a Gold Record. 

But they'r^ ^^|l good. 



CARMEN 


a 


KL-1373 KS'3373 



KL-1371 KS-3371 




KL-1372 KS-3372 



Sales Program on 
New Releases and Catalog. 

Ten per cent discount. 

Dating. 

Program ends March 15, 1964. 

Contact your Kapp distributor for details. 


















KRL-4502 KRS-4502 



KL-1355 


KS 335S 



KL-1359 KS'3359 



KLEI SKLE-1 



KL-1360 


KS-3360 





KL-1358 KS-335S 




rooiBO TS noH ninou . 

THEUlICOLNSft 



Kapp's Roger Williams Promo Sends 
'Steinway" LP Off To Fast Sales Start 


New Talent Gets Big Push 
Via New Albums From Kapp 



NEW YORK — Kapp Records’ promo 
tie-in with the 10th anniversary of 
its association with pianist Ro^er 
Williams is makinj? the sales grade. 

The drive, according to A1 Cahn, 
the label’s sales head, has put over 
Williams’ new LP, “A Solid Gold 
Steinway,” with enough force to indi- 
cate to the label that it is the fastest 
breaking LP in the label’s history. 

The album makes its initial ap- 


pearance on the album best-sellers 
chart this week in the number 80 
spot. 

The album was released, along with 
another set by the artist, “10th An- 
niversary/Limited Edition,” a 3-LP 
affair, on Jan. 12 to coincide with the 
start of the drive. That day was the 
scene of the label’s big sales meet in 
New York, which relayed to distribs 
the outline of the promo and word of 
additional new LP product. 

From this point of departure, the 
label set in motion a series of per- 
sonal appearances by Williams, in- 
cluding a “riot” at New York’s 
Macy’s Department Store. In addi- 
tion, the label offered distribs a num- 
ber of strong dealer aids, including 
a special browser, a “silent sales- 
man,” for the “Solid Gold Steinway” 
issue, display cards, cut-outs, stream- 
ers. Also, the label extended its do- 
it-yourself ad kit to the “Steinway” 
set. Under this system, a dealer is 
supplied with various photos of the 
artist so that they can make-up ads 
to suit their own taste and, possibly, 
local conditions. 


NEW YORK — Kapp Records is giv- 
ing new talent a chance to gain a 
place in the sun with its new LP 
product. 

In bringing newcomers on the disk 
scene, the label has taken note of 
flowering of the folk idiom by spot- 
lighting folk talent. One of Kapp’s 
new albums is “Joan Toliver,” a 
fresh talent who the company expects 
to be an important factor in folk- 
market sales. 

Married and the mother of four 
children (three sons, one daughter), 
the performer first made an impres- 
sion on folkniks through various ap- 
pearances on the west coast. Last 
summer, she was able to spread the 
word of her art to a greater extent 
by touring with Harry Belafonte, who 
auditioned her and gave her the op- 
portunity to tour with him. A native 
of Berea, Kentucky, she now lives in 
New York. Her husband is actor 
Josef Sommer. 

The artist is also heard in another 
new Kapp LP, “Midnight Hoot,” 
which also features Miriam Makeba, 
The Tarriers, Billy Edd Wheeler, Jo 
Mapes, Alan Lomax, Terry Gilkyson 
and The Simon Sisters. Latter attrac- 
tion is also new to the folk disk trade. 
The gals’ offering is also named after 
the performers, who have the en- 
dorsement of such a folk expert as 
Lee Hays. The sisters, Lucy & Carly, 
bail from the Riverdale section of the 
Bronx, New York. 

In its new release, 12 albums, three 
new Roger Williams’ LP’s excepted, 
Kapp has three other folk-directed 
packages. These include “The Do Re 
Mi Kids Hootenanny,” which contains 
“the folk songs children love to sing” 
(e.g. “Blue Tail Fly,” “Sweet Betsy 
from Pike,” “Skip to My Lou”). A 
third folk sound album introduces 
“Four Boys from Illinois — The Lin- 
colns.” 

The label is also playing-up its in- 
ternational attractions in the new 
product. Italy’s Claudio Villa is rep- 
resented with “Bravo!,” Germany’s 
LoMta has an LP bearing her name. 


Go: don Jenkins directs his orchestra 
and chorus in “I Live Alone,” a col- 
lection of disenchanted tunes, some i 
of which are original compositions by ' 
Jenkins himself (Jenkins’ most re- 1 
cent success as a composer is “This^ 
Is All I Ask”). 

The remaining new pop dates are# 
Black Moonlight & Sunshine” by 
Monty Sunshine, His Clarinet and 
His Band.” and “The Moods & The 1 
Music of Larry Douglas,” cut in J 
France by American composer-ar- i 
ranger-conductor Douglas. 


Kapp Dresses-Up Its 
Long-Hair Best-Sellers 

NEW YORK — Kapp Records, which 
has made sporatic bids for classicaP' 
market acceptance, has brought some 
of its best-selling long-hair entries to* 
market in new dress. 

Diskery has released five packages 
in its “Opera Without Words” series 
and a similar number of efforts by 
classical trumpeter Roger Voisin. ‘ 
The former series, boasting new 
sleeves, includes orchestral suites of» 
the scores of such opera standbys as 
“Cavalleria Rusticana,” “Madame 
Butterfly,” (seen below) “Aida.” 
(also shown below), “Carmen” and 
Tosca.” All five sets feature perform- 
ances of the Rome Symphony Or- 
chestra under the direction of Dom- 
enico Savino. 

Voisin’s “Music For Trumpet &< 
Orchestra” series (bottom photo) 
includes performances of works by 
Purcell, Vivaldi, Haydn, Torelli, 
Biber, Bach, Monteverdi and others. 
On three of the albums he is sup- 
Dorted by The Kapp Sinfonietta con- 
ducted by Emanuel Vardi. 


BH.VIAI),\M£liiirai|g| 




NEW YORK— Shortly following the 
formal kick-off of Kapp Records’ new 
promo for him, pianist Roger Wil- 
liams started a series of city-by-city 
promo treks to help the program 
along. 

One of the highlights of Roger’s 
roadwork was a “riot” at New York’s 
famed department store, Macy’s. Pho- 
to on the top left shows Roger be- 
hind the counter (carrying his Kapp 
LP’s) signing his autograph on LP’s 
purchased by the crowd of customers. 
Top right is a scene back-stage at 
Macy’s, where Jack Jones (second 
from left), another Kapp star, tries 
to best Mickey Kapp, label vp, at 
hand-wrestling. Looking on is Dave 
Kapp (left), president of the diskery, 
and Roger. 

In Boston, Roger was greeted at 
the Mayor’s office in City Hall by 
Acting Mayor Thomas Carty i(pic, 
bottom left), who is Traffic Com- 
missioner for the City of Boston. Al- 
so in Boston, the artist was host at 
a reception in his honor at the Sher- 
aton-Plaza Hotel. Shown in the photo 
(bottom, right) are (left to right) : 
Bob Levin, Boston Record One-Stop, 
Mrs. Jerry Flatto, wife of Jih^^ipr^i- 
dent of Boston Record One-Stop 
(standing next to Roger), Dick Mit- 


chell, Dick’s Record One-Stop, and 
John Dunn, of Boston Record One- 
Stop. 

Following his Boston p.a., the per- 
former moved on to Cleveland, De- 
troit and Chicago, the last city on the 
trek. Besides dept, store visits in each 
city, Roger visited top deejays in each 
locale and hosted receptions at lead- 
ing hotels. Distribs prepared for each 
visit by taking space in local news- 
papers to coincide with Roger’s stay 
and by making sure display pieces 
were in the hands of dealers. 


NEW YORK — The young lady whose 
portrait adorns the cover of her first 
album for Kapp Records will be the 
label’s big folk-market push in the 
months ahead. 

The folk singer’s LP, named after 
her, is one of the label’s new album 
offerings, many of which give other 
new talent their first LP perform- 
ances. In addition to her own pack- 
age, Joan is joined by a bevy of big 
folk names on “Midnight Hoot,” also 
a new Kapp release. 


She came through in the U.S. awhile 
back with “Sailor, Sailor.” From 
Mexico, the diskery is releasing “Vi- 
va! Vera Cruz” by Juan Davida and 
His Banda Mexicana. 

The Claudio Villa and Lolita sets, 
by the way, represent additions to 
the label’s new series of releases from 
abroad. They are marketed under the 
tag of “4 Corners of the World — A 
Kapp Record.” 

The straight pop area is also well- 
represented in Kapp’s new LP dates. 



Kapp Tags Joan Toliver For Folk Stardom 



rail 













TOP 100 Albums 



MONAURAL 


Pos. Last Week 


FEBRUARY 15, 1964; 


i 1 

Ij 

MEET THE BEATLES 

(Capitol T 2047) 

1 

2 

IN THE WIND 

Peter, Paul & Mary 
(Warner Bros. WB 1507) 

2 


HONEY IN THE HORN 

Al Hirt (RCA Victor LPM 2733) 

8 

II 4 

THE SINGING NUN 

Soeur Sourire (Philips PCC 203) 

3 

6 5 

CHARADE 

5 

ii 

Henry Mancini (UCA Victor LPM 2755) 

! ‘ 

JOAN BAEZ IN CONCERT 
VOL. II 

(Vanguard VSD 2123) 

4 

* 7 

FUN IN ACAPULCO 

Elvis Presley (RCA Victor LPM 2756) 

6 

! 8 

Ii 

1, 

THE SECOND BARBRA 
STREISAND ALBUM 

(Columbia CL 2054) 

11 

i| 

1 9 

1 

LITTLE DEUCE COUPE 

Beach Boys (Capitol T 1998) 

7 

;• 

I 

THE WONDERFUL WORLD 

OF ANDY WILLIAMS 

(Columbia CL 2137) 

17 


INTRODUCING THE BEATLES 

(Vee Jay LP 1062) 

48 

; 

CURB YOUR TONGUE, 

KNAVE 

9 

) 

Smothers Brothers (Mercury MG 20862) 

! ^3 

WEST SIDE STORY 

Filmtrack (Columbia OL 5670) 

10 

1 14 

1 

PETER, PAUL & MARY 

(Warner Bros. WB 1449) 

13 

> 15 

i 

WIVES & LOVERS 

Jack Jones (Kapp KL 1352) 

20 

' 16 

1 

ROMANTICALLY 

Johnny Mathis (Columbia CL 2098) 

15 

' 17 

1 

DRAG CITY 

Jan & Dean (Liberty LP 7339) 

21 

:• 

TIME TO THINK 

Kingston Trio (Capitol T 2011) 

38 

; 19 

CATCH A RISING STAR 

John Gary (RCA Victor LM 2745) 

23 

o 

<M 

THAT WAS THE WEEK 

THAT WAS 

BBC (Decca DL 9116) 

12 

1 21 

1 

I 

THE BARBRA STREISAND 
ALBUM 

(Columbia CL 2007) 

24 

1 22 

1 

1 

RICK NELSON SINGS 
"FOR YOU" 

(Decca DL 4479) 

14 

; 23 

1 

BIG SOUNDS OF THE DRAGS 

(Capitol T 2001) 

28 

:• 

THE VENTURES IN SPACE 

(Dolton BLP 2027) 

47 

;• 

TENDER IS THE NIGHT 

Johnny Mathis (Mercury MG 20890) 

56 

i 

1 

MOVIN' 

Peter, Paul 8, Mary 
(Warner Bros. WB 1473)) 

16 

' 27 

1 

WASHINGTON SQUARE 

Village Stampers (Epic LN 24078) 

18 

N) 

00 

DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES 

Andy Williams (Columbia CL 2015) 

27 

i 29 

1 

JOAN BAEZ IN CONCERT 

(Vanguard VRS 9112) 

30 

1 30 

RAMBLIN' 

New Christy Minstrels 
(Columbia CL 2055) 

19 

1 31 

1 

MARIA ELENA 

Los Indios Tabajaras 
(RCA Victor LPM 2822) 

26 

i 32 

SURFER GIRL 

Beach Boys (Capitol T 1981) 

34 

, 33 

1 

WONDERFUL, WONDERFUL 

Lawrence Welk (Dot DLP 3552) 

22 

I 34 

1 

1 

ROY ORBISON'S GREATEST 
HITS 

(Monument M 8000) 

32 


k 

36 

37 


38 

39 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 


50 

• 

52 

53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 


60 

61 

62 

• 

64 

65 

66 
67 


SURFIN' BIRD 

Trashman (Garrett GA 200) 


Pos. Last Week 

55 


LOUIE, LOUIE 

Kingsmen (Wand 657) 


LAWRENCE OF ARABIA 42 

Filmtrack (Colpix CP 514) 

JOHN F. KENNEDY— THE 
PRESIDENTIAL YEARS 25 

(20th Century Fox TFM 3127) 

BACH'S GREATEST HITS 29 

Swingle Singers (Phiiips PHS 600 097) 

BLUE VELVET 36 

Bobby Vinton (Epic LN 24068) 

THERE I'VE SAID IT AGAIN 67 

Bobby Vinton (Epic LN 24081) 

TRINI LOPEZ AT PJ's 41 

(Reprise R 6093) 

SING A SONG WITH THE 
KINGSTON TRIO 46 

(Capitol KOA 2005) 

I LEFT MY HEART IN 

SAN FRANCISCO 50 

Tony Bennett (Columbia CL 1869) 

BYE BYE BIRDIE 33 

Filmtrack (RCA Victor LS 01031) 

MORE TRINI LOPEZ AT PJ's 31 

(Reprise R 56103) 

SINCE I FELL FOR YOU 53 

Lenny Welch (Cadence 3068) 

WE SHALL OVERCOME 59 

Pete Seeger (Columbia CL 2101) 

LIVING A LIE 79 

Al Martino (Capitol T 2040) 

YESTERDAY'S LOVE SONGS — 
TODAY'S BLUES 69 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol T 2012) 

HOW THE WEST WAS WON 35 

Filmtrack (MGM 1 E 5) 


68 


71 


THE GIRL WHO CAME 
TO SUPPER 57 

B'way Cast (Columbia KOL 6020) 

THINK ETHNIC 37 

Smothers Brothers (Mercury MG 20777) 

PAINTED, TAINTED ROSE 40 

Al Martino (Capitol T 1975) 

no IN THE SHADE 43 

B'way Cast (RCA Victor LC 1085) 

ANY NUMBER CAN WIN 39 

Jimmy Smith (Verve 8552) 

MOON RIVER 64 

Andy Williams (Columbia CL 1809) 

CHAD MITCHELL TRIO 
SINGIN' OUR MIND 44 

(Mercury MG 20838) 

YOU MAKE ME FEEL SO 
YOUNG 78 

Ray Conniff (Columbia CL 2118) 

DEEP PURPLE 61 

Nino Tempo & April Stevens (Atco 33-156) 

J.F.K. 45 

(Documentaries Unlimited Vol. 1) 

SHUT DOWN 58 

Beach Boys (Capitol T 1919) 

LESLEY GORE SINGS FOR 
MIXED-UP HEARTS 80 

(Mercury MG 20849) 

HERE'S LOVE 51 

B'way Cast (Columbia KOL 6000) 

INGREDIENTS IN A RECIPE 
FOR SOUL 63 

Ray Charles (ABC Paramount ABC) 

MANTOVANI MANHATTAN 52 

(London LL 3328) 

LET ME SING 54 

Brenda Lee (Decca DL 4439) 


71 

72 

• 

74 

75 

76 

• 

78 

79 

• 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 


Pos. Last Week ^ 

ROBERT GOULET IN PERSON 49 ■ 

(Columbia CL 2088) g 

BLUE VELVET & 1963's B 

GREATEST HITS 82 B 

Billy Vaughn (Dot DLP 3559) ^ 

OUT OF LIMITS 83 ■ 

Marketts (Warner Bros W 1537) g 

I REMEMBER BUDDY HOLLY 65 9 

Bobby Vee (Liberty LRP 3336) = 

SINATRA'S SINATRA 60 ■ 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise R 1010) s 

KIND OF LOVE 92 S 

Letterman (Capitol T 2013) = 

LANGUAGE OF LOVE 73 ■ 

Jerry Vale (Columbia CL 2043) = 

THE FREE-WHEELIN' M 

BOB DYLAN 62 B 

(Columbia CL 1986) g 

RING OF FIRE 84 B 

Johnny Cash (Columbia CL 2053) ^ 

GREAT FOLK THEMES — S 

Percy Faith (Columbia CL 2108) = 

HOLLYWOOD — MY WAY 66 ■ 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol T 1934) H 

MONDO CANE 68 8 

Filmtrack (United Artists UAL 4105) ^ 

THE SOLID GOLD STEINWAY — E 

Roger Williams (Kapp KL 1354) ^ 

TOP HITS OF 1963 86 ■ 

Bobby Rydell (Cameo C 1070) = 

HELLO DOLLY — ■ 

Broadway Cast (RCA Victor LCO 1087) g 

FOUR DAYS THAT SHOCKED B 
THE WORLD 88 B 

(Colpix CP 2500) m 

EVERYTHING IS A O.K. 99 B 

Astronauts (RCA Victor LPM 2782) g 

TALK BACK TREMBLING ■ 

LIPS — H 

Johnny Tillotson (MGM E 4188) = 

BEAUTY AND THE BEARD 98 g 

Al Hiri & Ann Margret = 

(RCA Victor LPM 2690) m 

JOHN F. KENNEDY — H 

MEMORIAL ALBUM — B 

(Premier 2099) g 

OLDIES BUT GOODIES— g 

VOL. 6 — B 

Various Artists (Original Sound 5011) = 

THERE'S A MEETIN' B 

HERE TONIGHT 85 g 

Joe & Eddie (Crescendo GNP 86) g 

HELLO YOUNG LOVERS — B 

Jimmy Durante (Warner Bros. W 1531) ^ 

QUIET NIGHTS — S 

Miles Davis (Columbia CL 2106) = 


BOB NEWHART FACES 
BOB NEWHEART 

(Warner Bros. W 1517) 


96 


REFLECTIONS — g 

Chad Mitchell Trio (Mercury MG 20891) g 

BORN TO SING THE BLUES — B 

Brook Benton (MG 20886) = 

LOVE HIM — m 

Doris Day (Columbia CL 2131) g 

SURFIN' U.S.A. 9(>S 

Beach- Beys (Capitol T 1890) = 

THE GOLDEN HITS OF g 

JERRY LEE LEWIS — g 

(Smash MG 27047) g 

PURE DYNAMITE — ( 

James Brown (King K 883) = 

(DOWN AT) PAPA JOE'S lOoB 

Dixiebelles (Soundstage 7 M 5000) g 

CONCERT FOR LOVERS 93 B 

Ferrante & Teicher (UAL 3315) s 


• COMPILED BY CASH BOX FROM LEADING RETAIL OUTLETS 


Indicafes Strong Upward Moveg 


llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

TOP so 
STEBEO 


2 

3 


5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 


16 

17 

18 
19 

m 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 


27 

28 


30 

m 

32 

33 

34 


36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 

50 


Pos. Lost Week 


MEET THE BEATLES 3 

(Capitol ST 2047) 

IN THE WIND 1 

Peter, Paul & Mary 
(Warner Bros. WB 1507) 

THE SINGING NUN 2 

Soeur Sourire (Philips PCC 603) 

HONEY IN THE HORN 8 

Al Hirt (RCA Victor LSP 2733) 

CHARADE 4 

Henry Mancini (RCA LSP 2755) 

WEST SIDE STORY 5 

Filmtrack (Columbia OS 2070) 

THE SECOND BARBRA STREISAND 
ALBUM 9 

(Columbia CS 8854) 

ROMANTICALLY 7 

Johnny Mathis (Columbia CS 8898) 

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF 
ANDY WILLIAMS 13 

(Columbia CS 8937) 

FUN IN ACAPULCO 6 

Elvis Presley (RCA Victor LSP 2756) 

JOAN BAEZ IN CONCERT VOL. II 10 

(Vanguard VS 2123) 

WASHINGTON SQUARE 11 

Village Stampers (Epic BN 26078) 

PETER, PAUL & MARY 12 

(Warner Bros. WV 1449) 

CURB YOUR TONGUE, KNAVE 15 

Smothers Bros. (Mercury SR 60862) 

WIVES 8, LOVERS 22 

Jack Jones (Kapp KS 1352) 

LITTLE DEUCE COUPE 17 

Beach Boys (Capitol ST 1998) 

RAMBLIN' 16 

New Christy Minstrels 
(Columbia CS 8855) 

MARIA ELENA 14 

Los Indios Tabajaras 
(RCA Victor LSP 2822) 

CATCH A RISING STAR 21 

John Gary (RCA Victor LSP 2745) 

TIME TO THINK 43 

Kingston Trio (Capitol ST 2011) 
WONDERFUL, WONDERFUL 19 

Lawrence Welk (Dot DLP 25552) 

DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES 24 


Andy Williams (Columbia CS 8815) 

RICK NELSON SINGS "FOR YOU" 18 

(Decca DL 74479) 

THE BARBRA STREISAND ALBUM 28 

(Columbia CS 8807) 


MOVIN' 20 

Peter, Paul & Mary 
(Warner Bros. WB 1473) 

VENTURES IN SPACE 37 

(Dolton BST 8027) 

MANTOVANI MANHATTAN 33 

(London PS 328) 

BYE BYE BIRDIE 26 

Soundtrack (RCA Victor LSO 1081) 

YOU MAKE ME FEEL SO YOUNG 40 

Ray Conniff (Columbia CS 8918) 

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA 25 

Soundtrack (Colpix SCP 514) 

YESTERDAY'S LOVE SONGS— 

TODAY'S BLUES 42 

Nancy Wilson (Capitol ST 2012) 

BIG SOUNDS OF THE DRAGS 35 

(Capitol ST 1890) 

HOW THE WEST WAS WON 27 

Soundtrack (MGM SE I E 5) 


THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS 29 

BBC (Decca DL 79116) 

LIVING A LIE — 

Al Martino (Capitol ST 1975) 


I LEFT MY HEART IN 

SAN FRANCISCO 34 

Tony Bennett (Columbia CS 8669) 

TENDER IS THE NIGHT 49 

Johnny Mathis (Mercury SR 60890) 

110 IN THE SHADE 38 

B'way Cast (RCA Victor LSO 1085) 

BACH'S GREATEST HITS 32 

Swingle Singers (Philips PHS 600 097) 

KIND OF LOVE 45 

Letterman (Capitol ST 2013) 

THE GIRL WHO CAME TO SUPPER 30 

B'way Cast (Columbia KOS 2430) 

JOAN BAEZ IN CONCERT 31 

(Vanguard VRD 2122) 

THERE I'VE SAID IT AGAIN — 

Bobby Vinton (Epic BN 26081) 

MORE TRINI LOPEZ AT PJ's. 33 

(Reprise R9 56103) 

SINATRA'S SINATRA 39 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise R9 1010) 

PAINTED, TAINTED ROSE 36 

Al Martino (Capitol ST 1975) 

ANY NUMBER CAN WIN 41 

Jimmy Smith (Verve 6 8552) 

HELLO DOLLY — 

Broadway Cast (RCA Victor LSO 1087) 

ROBERT GOULET IN PERSON 44 

(Columbia CS 8888) 

HERE'S LOVE 46 

Broadway Cast (Columbia KOS 2400) 







“THE CASCADING VOICES OF HUGO & LUGI 
WITH BRASS”— RCA Victor LSP 2789 
Hugo and Lugi’s two previous Cascading Voices 
LP’s have been big sellers and this edition which 
introduces brass to the choral stylings should de- 
velop into a similar coin-catcher. The massed 
voices beautifully augment the brass section as 
they dish-up first-rate renditions of “Me And My 
Shadow,” “Fly Me To The Moon” and “I Lreft My 
Heart In San Francisco.” Eye the package for 
rapid acceptance. 


“JONATHAN WINTERS’ MAD, MAD, MAD, ' 
MAD, WORLD”— Verve 15041 I 

The wacky humor of Jonathan Winters is at its I 
wackiest on this new offering from Verve. One of | 
the wittiest in the business, the laffman explores | 
a variety laugh-loaded situations sure to incite j 
gales of hilarity. His weird home-made sound . 
effects are the perfect complement to his riotous 
stories. Lots of chuckles to be had here with 
“Moby Dick & Captain Arnold,” “Hip Robin • 
Hood” and “Great White Hunter.” The disk could I 
be chart item. 1 

1 


“THE BEATLES WITH TONY SHERIDAN & 
THEIR GUESTS”— MGM E 4215 
The Beatles, currently riding the top of the sin- 
gles and LP charts with their latest release on 
other labels, team up with British songster Tony 
Sheridan and are included with the Titans on this 
new offering from MGM. The best-selling group 
lash out with “Cry For A Shadow,” “Why” and 
their current chart click, “My Bonnie,” with Tony 
Sheridan and the Titans doing “Johnson Rag,” 
“Swanee River” and others. Beatle-mania is “in” 
and the set should score at the marketplace. 


“KENNEDY IN GERMANY”— Philips PCC 210 
There is a plethora of Kennedy albums on the 
market, most of which duplicate content, but this 
new issue on Philips’ Connoisseur Series takes a 
different approach. The late President’s historic 
trip to Germany in the summer of ’63 is recapitu- 
lated by the label with Howard K. Smith narrat- 
ing. The major talks by Adenauer, Brandt and the 
President are included along with the printed 
texts and pictures in an attractive jacket. The set 
should stir up interest. 


CoshBm ALBUM REVIEWS 


POP PICKS 


T.hfi mfko sarrirrxis s[rx»c>HS 


FRANK FONTAINE 


“THE MANY MOODS OF TONY”— Tony Ben- 
nett — Columbia CL 2141 

Tony Bennett, with four consecutive chart-riding 
albums to his credit, is sure to make it five with 
this new session on Columbia that spotlights the 
songster in a variety of moods and tempos. 
Launching the set with his current click single, 
“The Little Boy,” the chanter follows it with pol- 
ished surveys of such goodies as “I’ll Be Around,” 
“Spring In Manhattan” and a new Harold Arlen 
tune “So Long, Big Time.” 


“KISMET” — Mantovani, Robert Merrill — London 
SP 44043 

London comes up with a Broadway revival that 
promises to be a blockbuster seller for the label. 
Robert Wright and George Forrest’s delightful 
“Kismet” is beautifully recreated by a stellar cast 
that includes Robert Merrill, Regina Resnik, Ken- 
neth McKellar, Adele Leigh, Ian Wallace, the 
Mike Sammes Singers, and a 55-piece orchestra 
conducted by Mantovani. It’s a lustrous perform- 
ance that glows from beginnig to end. Waxed in 
phase 4 stereo, this disk is a masterful production. 


“FRANK FONTAINE SINGS ‘HOW SWEET IT 
IS’” — ABC-Paramount ABC-470 
Frank “Crazy Guggenheim” Fontaine skyrocketed 
to the crest of the LP charts with his first two is- 
sues on ABC-Par., and this third chapter served 
up in the same way is sure to go the hitsville 
path. With arrangements by Sid Feller and Bill 
Stegmeyer and an orchestra conducted by Hugo 
Winterhalter, the songster smoothly essays “Let 
The Rest Of The World Go By,” “All I Do Is 
Dream Of You” and “It’s The Talk Of The Town.” 


“JOHN GARY ENCORE”— RCA Victor LSP 2804 
John Gary, who came from left field to zoom to 
the top 20 of the LP charts with his debut disk 
on RCA Victor, comes up with a powerful second 
stanza that should go the same successful route. 
The chanter’s amazing breath control, wide range 
and lyrical approach to a melody is much in evi- 
dence here as he gives potent readings of “Tender 
Is The Night,” “And This Is My Beloved” and 
“Stranger In Paradise.” Eye it for top-drawer 
sales. 




c’.vrp]RiNA \ ai.ente; 


“OUT OF LIMITS”— Marketts— Warner Bros. 
1537 

The Marketts, who are currently riding high on 
the charts with “Out Of Limits,” tag this new 
Warner Bros. LP outing after the single and in- 
clude eleven other teen-angled swingin’ instru- 
mental tracks. The group’s distinctive blend of 
harmony and rhythm is firmly evidenced on “Love 
1985,” “Twilight City” and “Limits Beyond.” Disk 
seems sure to reach the charts in no time fiat. 


“APOLLO SATURDAY NIGHT”— Various Ar- 
tists — Atco 33 159 

Here’s a power-packed session cut live at Goth- 
am’s famed Apollo Theatre featuring such well- 
known pop-r&b names as Doris Troy, Rufus 
Thomas, Otis Redding, the Coasters, Ben E. King, 
etc. All the excitement heard in the theatre is 
captured on this swingin’ danceable disk. Best 
listening bets here include “Pain In My Heart” by 
Otis Redding and “Don’t Play That Song” by 
Ben E. King. 


“HEY LITTLE COBRA”— Rip Cords— Columbia 
CL 2151 

The Rip Chords tag this power-packed Columbia 
album after the giant single of “Hey Little 
Cobra” and include eleven other hard-driving hot 
rod items. The duo’s wide-range, vocal talents 
carry them in good stead in top-fiight, rhythmic 
renditions of “Here I Stand,” “Little Deuce 
Coupe” and “Drag City.” Album has enough built- 
in success ingredients to score heavily. 


“SONGS I’VE SUNG ON THE PERRY COMO 
SHOW” — Caterina Valente 

Caterina Valente, who is vocally one of the most 
versatile singers on either side of the Atlantic, 
uses her wide-range vocal charms and power- 
packed delivery to best advantage on this set of 
romantic and uptempo rhythm ballads. The lark’s 
phrasing is superb and every track is a winner. 
Slick bands here are “Make Someone Happy,” 
“More Than Likely” and “Stella By Starlight.” 
The album is her most powerful to date and could 
happen big. 


“THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN’ ’’—Bob 
Dylan — Columbia CL 2105 

Bob Dylan, who jumped from semi-obscurity to 
national fame with his last best-selling “Free- 
wheelin’ ” LP, seems sure to go a similar success 
route with this collection of self-penned folk mes- 
sage-songs. The chanter-guitarist’s earthy, hard- 
drivin’ ethnic style is firmly evidenced on “The 
Times They Are A-Changin’,” “Only A Pawn In 
Their Game” and “Restless Farewell.” Album 
could skyrocket. 


“AN EVENING WITH CAROL LAWRENCE”— 
Cameo C 1077 

Carol Lawrence, who skyrocketed to national 
prominence in a variety of entertainment media, 
makes strong bid for similar success on wax with 
this debut album on Cameo. The songstress’ deliv- 
ery is vibrant and feelingful here as she dispenses 
warmth and vitality on a program of Broadway, 
folk and pop tunes that include “Love Me Or 
Leave Me,” “Out Of This World” and “West Side 
Story Medley.” The package could do a block- 
buster for the lark. 






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Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


27 










Put Eddy Arnold on iisgj ^ 

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Contact victor DiSTRiBum FOR^^^c^ details today! 


28 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


Have a sales spree for 
Eddy Arnold's 20th 
Anniversary on RCA Victor 

The most trusted name in sound 



12 iolk gems. Includes "Cotton Fields," 
"Slowin' in the Wind," "Molly," "Time's 
A-Gettin'Hard." LPM/LSP-2811 



America's best-known songs ol faith like 
"He Lives Next Door" and "I Love to Tell 
the Story." LPM/LSP-2629 



A great tribute to 12 lamiliarSonthem songs. 
Includes "The Battle of New Orleans" and 
"Moody River." LPM/LSP-2596 



The best tunes of the American West like 
"The Streets ol Laredo" and "A Cowboy's 
Dream." LPM/LSP-2578 


CHRisfmns 

WITH ' “ 



Holiday favorites, snng in the Arnold tradi- 
tion, like "Winter Wonderland" and "White 
Christmas." LPM/LSP-2554 


axis ssans xzxasj 

&OSV A.ni<faL.ai 



New arrangements of Eddy's top hits. In- 
cludes "What a Fool I Was" and "Just Out 
of Reach." LPM/LSP-2471 



Ballads in a smooth, soothing perform- 
ance. Like "Will You Always" and "Are You 
Sincere?" LPM/LSP-2337 



Eddy gives the best ol advice with 12 
beautiful love songs. Includes "Love and 
Marriage," "Love Me." LPM/LSP-2268 



SINGS THEM AGAIN 


EDDY ARNOLD 


Eddy's greatest performances on one record. 
Includes "I Walk Alone" and "Texarkana 
Baby." LPM/LSP-2185 



Outstanding selection of true American folk 
tunes like "Tom Dooley," "Jesse James" 
and "Riders in the Sky." LPM/LSP-2036 



Eddy travels and sings through twelve 
states. Includes "Stars Fell on Alabama" 
and "Georgia on My Mind." LPM/LSP-1928 



ftCA V ictor 


PEAISE 


PEAISE 


FANNY CROSBY HYMNS 


AENOLB 


The most requested and heart-warming 
hymns like "Near the Cross" and "Safe in 
the Arms ol Jesus." LPM-1733 



All-time perennial hits like "Don't Fence Me 
In," "Tennessee Waltz," "Sixteen Tons" 
and "1 Don't Hurt Anymore." LPM-1293 



Popular, inspirational hymn ballads like 
"Crying in the Chapel," "His Hands" and 
"I CaUed on the Master." LPM-1225 



A great collection of country songs! "It's 
a Sin," "Bouquet of Roses," "Anytime," 
"Molly Darling," LPM-1224 



Tunes Eddy's fans never tire ol hearing 
like " Moonlight and Roses " and “ I'm Gonna 
Lock My Heart." LPM-1223 





The lonesome traveler sings a dozen mel- 
low and tender tunes like “Down in theVal- 
ley" and "The Rovin' Gambler." LPM-1111 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


29 












Cash 




ALBUM REVIEWS 


I 


“FABULOUS” — Dick Hyman — Command RS862- 
sp 

Dick Hyman’s track record of previous organ 
disks is mighty impressive but this new Com- 
mand session of teen favorites and evergreens 
played on the big Lowery organ ranks as one of 
his best efforts to date. Hyman is in superlative 
form as he dishes-up some imaginative readings 
of “Washington Square,” “I’ll Be Around” and 
“The Best Is Yet To Come.” Deejays should find 
plenty of programmable material here. 



“THE WORLD’S GREATEST LOVE SONGS”— 
Harve Presnell — MGM E 4194 
Harve Presnell, who won wide acclaim for his 
leading-man part in the Broadway musical, “The 
Unsinkable Molly Brown,” displays a big voice 
with a wide range and lyrical purity on this pro- 
gram of evergreen romantic ballads on MGM. The ** 
tenor is first-rate on “Yours Is My Heart Alone,” 

“If I Loved You” and “And This Is My Beloved.” 
The singer is sure to gain a big following with 
the set. , 


“THE SERENDIPITY SINGERS”— Philips PHS 
600-115 

Originality and freshness of style are becoming 
increasingly rare in folk music these days. How- 
ever, the Serendipitys are a delightful exception 
to the rule. This nine-strong group of folksingers 
and instrumentalists display a distinctive brand 
of harmony and imaginative, exciting form as 
they offer “Waggoneer Lad,” “Sunshine Special” 
and “Freedom’s Star.” A group to watch. 



“PERSPECTIVE ON BUD & TRAVIS”— Liberty 
LRP 3341 

Although folk fads come and go Bud and Travis • • 
continue with their distinctive stylings unmoved 
by the fickle determinations of the public. These 
two folksingers boast an authentic, moving ap- 
proach as they go through their musical poise 
with intense feeling for their material. The boys ' 
are superb on “Maria Christina,” “I Never Will 
Marry” and “So Long, Stay Well.” /'I 


POP BEST BETS 


“MY FAVORITE SONGS”— Merv Griffin— Cameo 
C 1060 

Merv Griffin, who collected several gold disks a 
few years back, returns to the wax scene on 
Cameo with this potpourri of country, folk and 
barroom ballads. The songster’s deep, rich voice 
and warm style is a natural for these lilting, 
melodic tunes, and he delivers them with verve 
and polish. His legions of fans will find plenty of 
first-rate listening enjoyment here as he essays, 
“Have I Told You Lately That I Love You,” 
“Rambling Rose” and “Marching To Pretoria.” 


“HONKY TONE HOOTENANNY”— ‘Big’ Tiny 
Little— Coral CRL 757448 

Tiny Little, who has earned many laurels in the 
past for his distinctive, nostalgic honky tonk 
musical stylings, jumps on the folk bandwagon 
via this top-notch, swingin’ hootenanny set. While 
backed by a full ork and chorus the 88’er is ef- 
fectively spotlighted of delightful rhythmic ar- 
rangements of “Tom Dooley,” “Tom Cat” and 
“Good Old Mountain Dew.” Loads of potential 
here. 



“FOLK-DIXIE JAMBOREE” — Living Guitars — 'V 
RCA Camden CAS 801 

Here’s a swinging session of folk tunes with a 
touch of Dixie added for flavor by RCA Camden’s 
Living Guitars. Most of the tunes here have been 
around a long time but these sparkling updated ^ 
treatments make for first-rate listening pleasure. 
More recent items included here are “Blowin’ In < 
The Wind,” “Washington Square” and “Saturday ' 
Night.” A good item for the dance buffs. ) 


“GEORGE JONES SINGS MORE NEW FAVOR- 
ITES”— United Artists UAS 6338 
Over the years George Jones has managed to *■ 
come up with an amazing batch of country hits. 

On this new UA disk the vet chanter offers a 
varied selection of ballads and novelties, all of 
which are recent vintage Jones chart triumps. The 
artist is in fine form as he renders feelingful, 
chorus-backed renditions of “Wrong Number,” “A 
Girl I Used To Know” and “You Comb Her Hair.” 
One of the best albums that George has cut in 
quite a while. • 


“HEIMWEH NACH ST. PAULI”— Freddy— 
MGM E 4195 

Freddy, an international favorite with more than 
14 million disks sold in recent years, makes a 
powerful bid for acceptance on this side of the 
Atlantic with this album of songs of the sea sung 
in German and English. The songster uses his rich 
bass voice to best advantage here as he feelingly 
reflects the nostalgia of “In Hamburg On The 
Waterfront,” “Son, Won’t You Come Back” and 
the while-back favorite “Sailor, 0 Sailor.” The 
chanter could make plenty of new friends here 
with the set. 



“NIGHT LIFE”— The Mary Kaye Trio— 20th 
Century Fox 4117 

Here is a potent issue from 20th Century Fox 
spotlighting the many talents of the Mary Kaye 
Trio that has that money-in-the bank sound. Some 
stellar vocal performances are turned in by Mary 
and Norman Kaye and the Trio in unison. The 
lark serves up feelingful readings of “What’s 
Yours,” “Charade” and the group is pulsating on 
“Stay” and “Spring Is Here.” Eye the set for 
some sure-fire sales activity and airtime spins. 



“DEUCES, T’S, ROADSTERS & DRUMS”— Hal ‘ 

Blaine— RCA Victor LSP 2834 
Hal Blaine and the Cougars unleash their instru- 
mental talents on this package of hot rod items 
from RCA Victor. Powerful rods become their ’ 
theme as they give equally potent renditions of a 
dozen instrumentals tagged after their wheels. 
Fast-paced and rhythmic bands here are “Chal- 
lenger II,” “Green Monster” and “Nashville Cou- 
pe.” The kids’ll dig these sounds. 


“THE MOODS AND THE MUSIC OF LARRY 
DOUGLAS”— Kapp KL 1358 
Larry Douglas conducts a 35-piece orchestra and 
an eight-voice choral group on this program of ^ 
original compositions that musically depict the 
city of Paris. The composer-conductor is a fine ^ 
creator of melody and the top-drawer Pierre Del- 
vincourt-Jean Pierre Landreau arrangements are 
lush and full. Loads of first-rate listening enjoy- ' 
ment to be had here as the ork and wordless cho- ( 
rus render “You’ll Beam When You See Paris,” 

“A New Tomorrow” and “Seabreeze.” , 



“LOLITA SINGS IN GERMAN”— Kapp FCL 4202 
Lolita, who scored an international hit a few 
years back with her “Sailor, Sailor” single, serves 
up a dozen melody-laden tunes in German on this 
Kapp 4 Corners issue. The lark’s warm voice and 
lilting delivery reflects broad universal appeal and 
the tunes here are a top showcase for her win- 
ning style. Best bets are “Where Have All The 
Flowers Gone,” “Dream Music” and “When We 
Shall Meet Again.” 



“BAWDY HOOTENANNY” — Oscar Brand — Au- 
dio Fidelity AFSD 6121 

Oscar Brand has built up quite an impressive rep- 
utation with his previous bawdy folk stylings now 
teams up with Dave Sear (on banjo) and offers a 
delightful collection of humorous, off-color folk- 
songs. Although none of the material will get 
airplay, Brand’s legions of fans should really dig 
his readings of “Cindy,” “Erie Canal” and “Don’t 
Call Me.” 


30 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







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Cash Box — February 15, 1964 




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Columbia Presents Awards 
In Dealer Contest 


CHICAGO — The above photos show 
the first place winner and the in- 
scribed plaques awarded to all winners 
in the Columbia Records Dealer Mer- 
chandising Contest. In the upper pic 
(left to right) Paul Smith, local 
branch manager of Columbia’s dis- 
tributor, Bernice Best of the Best 
Record Shop also received a set of golf : 
award, and Dick Van Gorp, regional 
sales manager for the label are shown 
at the presentation cei’emony. In the 
lower pic the plaques given to Lom- 
bard TV, North Shore Talking Ma- 
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and Records are shown. The Best i 
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AAA ALBUM 

REVIEWS 



JAZZ PICKS 




“BOBBY HACKETT PLAYS THE MUSIC OF 
BERT KEMPFERT”— Epic LN 24080 
Bobby Hackett offers a musical tribute to Bert 
Kaempfert on this melodic set of tunes made pop- 
ular by the vet orkster. The trumpeter gives each 
selection his individual, distinctive attention as he 
goes through his paces with all of his expected 
poise and verve. Hackett shines on “Wonderland 
By Night,” “Now And Forever” and “Sunday In 
Madrid.” Fine fare for either dancing or listen- 
ing pleasure. 



“BROTHER JACK AT THE JAZZ WORKSHOP 
LIVE!”— Jack McDuff— Prestige 7286 
Jack McDuff’s first in-person LP on Prestige, 
“Live!” pulled plenty of coin for the organist and 
this new session cut live at the Jazz Workshop is 
sure to meet with the same wide acceptance. Mc- 
Duff is modern without being extreme and tradi- 
tional without seeming square and the seven 
bands here are geared for universal appeal. Bright 
tracks here are “Blues 1 & 8,” “Grease Monkey,” 
“Vas Dis” and “Jive Samba.” Heavy sales are 
indicated. 


JAZZ BEST BETS 



“TOBACCO ROAD”— Lou Rawls— Capitol ST 2042 
With each new album Lou Rawls significantly 
gains in stature and poise. On this new set the 
blues songster displays an emotional power and 
conviction never evidenced on his previous record- 
ings. While backed by a full Onzy Matthews- 
helmed ork, Rawls offers some poignant readings 
of “Tobacco Road,” “Cotton Fields” and “Blues 
For A Four String Guitar.” LP should create 
plenty of excitement. 




“A NEW PERSPECTIVE”— Donald Byrd— Blue 
Note 4124 

Here’s an off-beat, interesting set coupling the 
midstream jazz artistry of trumpeter Donald 
Byrd with an eight-voice chorus and band. Byrd 
does not attempt to blend in with the band and 
chorus. Instead, he makes his highly-personal mu- 
sical statements which, in a lyrical sense, compli- 
ments the other happenings on the disk. Standout 
cuts here are “Elijah,” “Best Of Burden” and 
“The Black Disciple.” Pleasant late-hours mood 
companion. 


“COMIN’ IN THE BACK DOOR”— Wynton Kelly 
—RCA Victor V 8576 

Ace jazz 88’er Wynton Kelly teams up with an 
accomplished group of musicians including Kenny 
Burrell (guitar), Paul Chambers (bass) and Jim- 
my Cobb (drums) on this delightful swingin’ free- 
flowing Victor outing. Kelly does not resort to 
gimmicks but renders each item in an amazingly 
honest fashion. Among the most enjoyable tracks 
are “Don’t Wait To Long,” “The Bitter End” and 
“To Kill A Mockingbird.” Superior listening 
throughout. 



CLASSICAL PICKS 






(•Hi 

gT ^ ^ »{.ACK 


PROKOFIEV; Classical Symphony, Op. 25; Eu- 
gene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Or- 
chestra — Columbia ML 5945 

Prokofiev’s forty-seven year old “Classical Sym- 
phony, Op. 25” is given a superb reading by Eu- 
gene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra on 
this new classical offering from Columbia. The 
conductor captures all of the work’s buoyant, 
soaring constructions in his straight-forward in- 
terpretation. The disk also contains other Pro- 
kofiev selections including his famous “Suite From 
The Love For Three Oranges.” A standout 
achievement. 

GROFE: Grand Canyon Suite, London Festival 
Orchestra/Stanley Black — London SPC21002 
London Records debuts its Pop Concert Series on 
phase 4 with this performance of Ferde Grofe’s 
Grand Canyon Suite by the London Festitval Or- 
chestra conducted by Stanley Black. Here’s a pop 
standard with classical proportions and this new 
version is sure to bring the traffic into the shops. 
The stereo is crisp and brilliant and completely 
without gimmickry, and the composer’s music is 
as fresh and satisfying as it was when it was 
first performed three decades ago. Strong chart 
potential here. 


32 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


33 



NEW FOR FEBRUARY 


HAROLD VICK 

OUR MISS BROOKS / 
VICKSVILLE 

BLUE NOTE 45X1897 

From His New Album BLP 4138 

‘ STEPPIN’ OUT" 

FREDDIE ROACH 

PARTY TIME / 
NADA BOSSA 

BLUE NOTE 45X1892 

From His Hit Album BLP 4128 

“MO’ GREENS PLEASE ’’ 

GOING STRONG 

JMMV SMITH 

CAN HEAT 

BLUE NOTE 45X1905 

D.J.’s: Write for Free Samples 


BLUE NOTE 

43 W6lst St. New York 23, N. Y. 


OVER 

NITE HIT! 

“Be 

My Girl” 


P-901 

THE 

DOVELLS 

(With The New Sound) 





ALMOST 

HERE! 


RECORDS 





Cash Box IN 

WWW R&B LOCATIONS 


I 

Pos. Last Week 

WHAT KIND OF FOOL 

(Do You Think 1 Am) 3 

Toms (ABC Paramount 10502) 

2 

UM, UM, UM, UM, UM, UM 

Major Lance (Okeh 7187) 

1 

3 

TALKING ABOUT MY BABY 
Impressions (ABC Paramount 10511) 

6 

4 

LOUIE, LOUIE 2 

Kingsmen (Wand 143) 

Paul Revere & Raiders (Columbia 42814) 

5 

GOING GOING GONE 

Brook Benton (Mercury 72230) 

10 

6 

HARLEM SHUFFLE 

Bob & Earl (Mall 104) 

5 

7 

THE SHELTER OF YOUR ARMS 
Sammy Davis Jr. (Repris* 20216) 

12 

8 

TONIGHT YOU'RE GONNA FALL 

IN LOVE WITH ME 

Shirelles (Scepter 1264) 

4 

9 

WHO DO YOU LOVE 

Sapphires (Swan 4162) 

13 

10 

GOOD NEWS 

Sam Cooke (RCA Victor 8299) 

24 

11 

1 WISH YOU LOVE 

Gloria Lynne (Eyerest 2036) 

18 

12 

OH BABY DON'T YOU WEEP 

James Brown (King 5842) 

22 

13 

WHEN THE LOVE LIGHT STARTS 
SHINING THROUGH HIS EYES 
Supremes (Motown 1051) 

7 

14 

VAYA CON DIOS 

Drifters (Atlantic 2216) 

20 

15 

NEED TO BELONG 

Jerry Butler (Vee Jay 567) 

11 

16 

CAN 1 GET A WITNESS 

Marvin Goye (Tamla 54087) 

14 

17 

GONNA SEND YOU BACK TO 
GEORGIA 

Timmy Shaw (Wand 146) 

9 

18 

CAN YOUR MONKEY DO THE DOG 
Rufus Thomas (Stax 144) 

26 

19 

BABY 1 LOVE YOU 

Ronettes (Philles 118) 

8 

20 

HIS KISS 

Betty Harris (Jubilee 5465) 

15 

21 

LIVE WIRE 

Martha & Vandellas (Gordy 7027) 

34 

22 

DEEP IN THE HEART OF HARLEM 
Clyde McPhatter (Mercury 72220) 

16 

23 

SHIMMY SHIMMY 

Orlons (Cameo 295) 

28 

24 

THAT LUCKY OLD SUN 

Ray Charles (ABC-Paramount 10509) 

17 

25 

HIGH HEEL SNEAKERS 

Tommy Tucker (Checker 1067) 

39 

26 

IF SOMEBODY TOLD YOU 

Anna King (Smash 1858) 

19 

27 

ANYONE WHO HAD A HEART 

Dione Warwick (Scepter 1262) 

21 

28 

PUPPY LOVE 

Barbara Lewis (Atlantic 2214) 

36 

29 

QUICKSAND 

Martha & The Vondellas (Gordy 7025) 

23 

30 

AS LONG AS 1 KNOW HE'S MINE 
Marvelettes (Tamla 54088) 

25 

31 

WHAT'S EASY FOR TWO 

Mary Wells (Motown 1048) 

46 

32 

GREASY SPOON 

Hank Marr (Federal 12508) 

27 

33 

PAIN IN MY HEART 

Otis Redding (Volt 112) 

31 

34 

LITTLE BOY 

Crystals (Philles 119) 

40 

35 

THE NITTY, GRITTY 

Shirley Ellis (Congress 202) 

29 

36 

SO FAR AWAY 

Hank Jacobs (Sue 795) 

— 

37 

IT'S ALL RIGHT 

Impressions (ABC Paramount 10487) 

32 

38 

WHERE DID 1 GO WRONG 

DeeDee Sharp (Cameo 296) 

42 

39 

LEAVING HERE 

Eddie Holland (Motown 1052) 

— 

40 

MY TRUE CARRIE LOVE 

Nat Cole (Capitol 5125) 

— 

41 

YOU'RE NO GOOD 

Betty Everett (Vee Jay 566) 

Dee Dee Warwick (Jubilee 5459) 

33 

42 

HOOKA TOOKA 

Chubby Checker (Parkway 890) 

43 

43 

HE'LL HAVE TO GO 

Solomon Burke (Atlantic 2218) 

— 

44 

1 CAN'T STOP SINGING 

Bobby Bland (Duke 370) 

35 

45 

I'LL BE THERE (To Bring You Love) 
Majors (Imperial 66009) 

— 

46 

BYE BYE BARBARA 

Johnny Mathis (Mercury 72229) 

45 

47 

SINCE 1 FOUND A NEW LOVE 

Little Johnny Taylor (Galaxy 725) 

37 

48 

STRANGE THINGS ARE HAPPENING — 
Little Jr. Parker (Duke 371) 

49 

LODDY LO 

Chubby Checker (Parkway 890) 

30 

50 

SNAP YOUR FINGERS 

Barbara Lewis (Atlantic 2214) 

38 



MMM JUKE BOX OPS' 

Cash Box 

WWW RECORD GUIDE 

ACTIVE with OPS 

(Selections NOT on Cosh Box Top 100 reported going strongly with ops.) 


HERE'S A HEART 

Diplomats (Arock 1004) 

HAREM 

Acker Bilk (Atco 6282) 

CAN HEAT/MATILDA, MATILDA 

Jimmy Smith (Blue Note 1905) 

I'M TRAVELIN' ON 

Jackie Wilson (Brunswick 55260) 

STAY WITH ME 

Nick Noble (Chess 1879) 

ON AND ON 

Jerry Vale (Columbia 42951) 

I ADORE YOU 

Patti Page (Columbia 42963) 

I'M A WOMAN 

Barbra Streisand (Columbia 42965) 

MY HOME TOWN/A ROOM WITHOUT 
A WINDOW 

Steve Lawrence (Columbia 42952) 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 

Lefty Frizzell (Columbia 42924) 

WHO'S BEEN SLEEPING IN MY BED 

Linda Scott (Congress 204) 

SCATTER SHIELD 

Surfaris (Decca 31581) 

THE LA-DEE-DA SONG 

Village Stampers (Epic 9655) 

I'M LEAVING 

Johnny Nash (Groove 0030) 

IT AIN'T NO USE 

Lou Johnson (Hilltop 551) 

HELLO DOLLY 

Louis Armstrong (Kapp 573) 


THEME FROM 'CARDINAL' 

Roger Williams (Kapp 560) 

SNEAKY SUE 

Patti Lace & Petticoats (Kapp 563) 

GOING BACK TO LOUISIANA 

Bruce Channel (LeCam 122) 

I'LL MAKE YOU MINE 

Bobby Vee (Liberty 55670) 

NEVER LEAVE ME 

Stratfords (O'Dell 100) 

BE MY GIRL 

Dovells (Parkway 901) 

FROM ROCKING HORSE TO 
ROCKING CHAIR 

Paul Anka (RCA Victor 8311) 

KISSIN' COUSINS 

Elvis Presley (RCA Victor 8307) 

STAY WITH ME 

Frank Sinatra (Reprise 20249) 

STRANGER ON EARTH 

Dinah Washington (Roulette 4534) 

I'M WATCHING (EVERY LITTLE 
MOVE THAT YOU MAKE) 

Little Peggy March (RCA Victor 8302) 

MOLLY 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 8296) 

TELL ME BABY 

Garnet Mimms (UA 694) 

OUT OF THIS WORLD 

Gino Washington (Wand 147) 

ALL MY TRIALS 

Dick & Deedee (Warner Bros. 5411) 

HELLO YOUNG LOVERS 

I Jimmy Durante (Warner Bros. 5410) 


NEW ADDITIONS to TOP 100 


71— GLAD ALL OVER 

Dave Clark Five (Epic 9656) 

72— FUN, FUN, FUN 

Beach Boys (Capitol 5118) 

76 — BLUE WINTER 

Connie Francis (MGM 13214) 

77 — LEAVING HERE 

Eddie Holland (Motown 1052) 

80 — WORRIED GUY 

Johnny Tillotson (MGM 13193) 

81— MY TRUE CARRIE LOVE 

Nat Cole (Capitol 5125) 

82— HE'LL HAVE TO GO 

Solomon Burke (Atlantic 2218) 

85— WOMAN, LOVE AND A MAN 

Tony Clarke (Chess 1880) 


86— BIRD DANCE BEAT 

Trashmen (Garrett 4003) 

89 — YOUNG AND IN LOVE 

Chris Crosby (MGM 13191) 

91— PINK DOMINOES 

Crescents (Era 3116) 

93— I'LL BE THERE (TO BRING 
YOU LOVE) 

Majors (Imperial 66009) 

97— THE GIRL FROM SPANISH TOWN 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 42968) 

98 — STAY 

Four Seasons (Vee Jay 582) 

99 — UNDERSTAND YOUR MAN 

Johnny Cash (Columbia 42964) 

100— HIGH ON A HILL 

Scott English (Spokane 4003) 


AIMED at OPS 

AT LONG LAST LOVE/MY KIND OF GIRL— Murray Arnold 8. Trio— Decca 25628 


New Veep — New Staff 



LOS ANGELES — A1 Bennett, president of Liberty Records, parent company of 
Imperial Records, last week announced the appointment of Bob Skaff as a vice- 
president of Imperial. In line with the Skaff move, other key executive appoint- 
ments were made in the Imperial organization. Shown (left to right) in the left 
pic are Eddie Ray, A&R coordinator, Ken Revercomb, national sales manager, 
Skaff and Bennett. Pictured in the right pic is Rennie Roker, Gotham-based 
promo director. 


34 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 





Itues 


‘=fnPlH*7W.29.5 


v/yc 4&6I 


y/v8 «v 


ELLA SINGS BROi 


The Very Best Of Coiinie Francis 

C/8E416? 


To The Summer Of His Years 


E/«4m 


Modern italias Hits 


E/K4145 


£/SE 4102 


CCMVNIE 

FRANCIS 


MGM RECORDS AND VERVE RECORDS ARE DIVISIONS OF METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER, INC. 


Special point-of-sale material, window streamers, decorations, 
posters, flyers, etc. make every store a Connie & Ella festival ! 


CONNIE 
FRANCIS 
MONTH ON 




Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







In The Hit Footsteps Of His Father 



NEW YORK — Hank Williams, Jr. (left), who is currently clicking in both the 
pop and country departments with his initial MGM single release of “Long 
Gone Lonesome Blues,” a years-back hit of his famous late father, is pictured 
above at his MGM inking ceremonies with his mother-manager, Audrey Wil- 
liams, and Arnold Maxim, president of the label. 


Capitol Disk Club Makes Exec Appointments 


HOLLYWOOD — Daniel C. Bonbright, 
president of Capitol Record Club, Inc., 
has announced that Ron Beyl has 
been appointed administrator of spe- 
cial merchandising. 

Beyl, who was formerly administra- 
tor of the Record Club, will be respon- 
sible for the merchandising of prod- 
ucts, other than those manufactured 
by Capitol Records, which will be 
marketed through the Club. Tempo- 
rarily, Beyl will also cover the work 
that was performed by John Phillips, 
who has resigned. 

Bonbright also announced that Wil- 
liam A. Sheck has been employed as 
the administrator of operations. In 
this position, Sheck will be responsi- 
ble for the fulfillment, credit and the 
general administrative functions of 
the Record Club. Sheck has most re- 
cently been the assistant director of 
operations for the Columbia Record 
Club. Prior to that time, he was with 


I Hallmark Cards, Inc., and Montgom- 
ery Ward and Company. Both men 
will report directly to Bonbright. 


New Vinfon Single . . . It's 
An Evergreen Again 

NEW YORK — Bobby Vinton’s follow- 
up single to “There! I’ve Said It 
I Again,” a Top 10 offering, is being 
! rush-released by Epic Records. 

The tune, “My Heart Belongs To 
Only You” (backed by “Warm & Ten- 
I der”), is the third straight evergreen 
cut by the artist for singles release. 
Prior to “There!,” he cut “Blue Vel- 
vet,” another big success. Both ends 
I of the new deck were arranged and 
conducted by Stan Applebaum, who 
performed a similar stint on “There!,” 
with Bob Morgan, Epic’s exec pop 
A&R produced, in on the production 
end. 


I 

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I 

I 

Si 

* 1 * 

I 

❖ 

I 

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4- 

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I 

t 



The Tornadoes 

Sing A Tribute To All Surfers 

“PHANTOM SURFER” 

and 

“Shootin’ Beavers” 
Another Smash Hit 

By The Tornadoes on Aertaun Records 



“Hurtin’ 

The 

Most” 


“BIG 

COWBOY” 


by 

Dewy Davenport 

PICK 

OF THE WEEK 
by 

DJ’s all over 
U.S.A. 



Hi-“G” Lo-“C” Records 


ORDER YOUR RECORDS 
from 

Pep Distributers 

Los Angeles 6, California 
2958 West Pico Blvd. 


DISTRIBUTORS 


Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, 
Texas, Houston 


For information 
and promos write; 


I MATE MUSIC, INC 

f 3840 Lemon Street • Riverside, California 




t 

■> 

$ 

I 

X 

X 

*!♦ 

I 

i 

I 

X 

i 

I 

I 

V 

I 


% 

$ 


I 


•X 


I 


ALBUM PLANS 

Deals, discounts and programs being offered to 
dealers and distributors by record monufocfurers. 


ABC-PARAMOUNT 

1“^%% discount on ail albums, including ABC-Par and Impulse! Expires; March 31. 

ATLANTIC 

■'Period of Adjustment:” discount on all LP's. 30-()0-90 billing. Expires: March 31. 

CAMEO-PARKWAY 

10% discount on all albums. Expires: Feb. 15. 

CARIB 

Buy lO-gel-l-free on entire LP catalog. 100% exchangeable. 30-60-90 billing. Ne expiratitin 
late. 

DECCA-CORAL-BRUNSWICK 

“Up Front Counts More with Decca-Coral-Brunswick special incentive on LP product. See 
local distribs for details. 

LIBERTY-IMPERIAL-DOUBLE L 

Discount program on all album product. See local distrib for details. Expires: Feb. 15. 

LONDON 

Complete catalog available at discounts, dated billing, ad allowances, etc. Contact local distribs 
for full details. Expires: Mar. 31. 

MERCURY 

“Parade of Stars“-10% discount on all albums (except “Storyteller”). Dating is available to 
qualified dealers. Expires: Feb. 29. 

MERCURY-WING 

“Five Plus Four Plan:” Part 1: pop albums under normal pricing program; Part 2: classical 
LP’s on the basis of one free with four. Expires: March 1. 

NASHBORO 

Buy-7-get-l-free on entire catalog including new LP’s. 100% exchangeable. No expiration 
date has been set. 

ORIGINAL SOUND 

LP catalog available on a buy-lO-get-l-f ree basis. 100% exchangeable. No expiration dale 
set. 

PHILIPS 

“Stage III :” 10% discount on entire catalog. Expires : Feb. 29. 

PRESTIGE 

All labels on a 10% discount until further notice. John Coltrane albums (Prestige 7000 Series) 
are available on a buy 12 get 4 basis until March 31. 

REQUEST 

LP catalog available on a buy«10'get-2-free basis. Described as a limited-time oiTer. 

ROULETTE 

“Profit More in ’64 :” 15% discount on all albums. No termination date announced. 

SIMS 

15 new LP’s on a buy-lO-get-3-free basis. 100% exchange privilege. No expiration <late 
announced. 

SMASH 

“1964 — A Smash of a Leap Year:” 12%% discount on all Smash and Fontana albums. 

STARDAY 

“The Wonderful World of Country Music Sales Plan:” 15% d-scount on all regular-priced 
merchandise. 10% discount on Starday’s economy line of seven LP’s listing at $1.98. 100% ex- 
change privilege, dated billing and coop ads available from distribs. Discribed as a winter plan. 

TAMLA-MOTOWN-GORDY 

All LP*8 available on a buy*6*get>l«free basis. Described as a permanent program. 

VEE JAY 

10% discount on LP’s. 


Ethel Ennis Feted By 
RCA Victor In Chicago 



CHICAGO — Ethel Ennis, (night pic), a recent RCA Victor pactee, was recently 
feted by the label’s distributor here in the Lake Tower Hotel. The lark enter- 
tained the guests with excerpts from her debut LP, “This Is Ethel Ennis.” 
Shown in the left photo are (left to right) Cash Box correspondent Lee 
Brooks, Pat Kelleher of RCA Victor, Bob (Coffeehead) Larsen of WIND and 
Marty Hirsch of RCA Victor Distributors. 


36 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


Brond NEW Albums on DECCA 

BY THE GREAT NAMES IN 


COUNCRVi 



MUSIC 


DELUXE 2 RECORD SET 





BILL ANDERSON^/; 


imjs 


BILL ANDERSON SINGS DL 4499 HIGHWAY TO HEAVEN DL 4432 

Dl 74499 JIMMIE DAVIS DL 74432 


THE RED FOLEY STORY DXB 177 GOLDEN GOSPEL FAVORITES 

DXSB7177 BILLY GRAMMER DL 4460 

DL 74460 



COUNTRY HIT PARADE DL 4492 SANDS OF GOLD 

GOLDIE HILL DL 74492 WEBB PIERCE 


DL4486 JUST CALL ME LONESOME 

DL 74486 ERNEST TUBB DL 4385 

DL 74385 


ERNEST TUBB PRESENTS 
THE TEXAS TROUBADOURS 

DL 4459 
DL 74459 



ESPECIALLY FOR YOU DL 4493 TAKE UP THY CROSS DL 4464 ON STAGE AT THE GRAND OLE OPRY RED SOVINE DL 4445 

KITTY WELLS DL 74493 WILBURN BROTHERS DL 74464 VARIOUS ARTISTS DL 4393 DL 74445 

DL 74393 


NOW AVAILABE AT ALL DECCA BRANCHES 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


w 




A 


dsh Box 


RECORD 

RAMBLINGS 


NEW YORK: 

A1 Martino, scoring on all the 
charts with his “Living A Lie” single 
& LP on Capitol, post cards from 
Montreal that the temp hits 20 below 
and he could use a pair of long han- 
dles. . . . Gene Pitney writes from 
Milan he had high hopes for the San 
Remo Song Festival — if he could re- 
member all the Italian lyrics. . . . 
Marvin Deane told us The All Night 
Singers, soon to be released on Re- 
prise, are a solid click at the Blue An- 
gel. . . . Katyna Ranieri and hubby 
Riz Ortolan! made their Carnegie Hall 
debut last week (8) assisted by a 40- 
piece orchestra and eight-voice chor- 
us. . . . John Dolan writes that Renee 
Roberts will soon have a new deck on 
Stacy dubbed “I Don’t Miss You Any- 
more” and “The Brand New Boy.” 
. . . Thelma Carpenter holding forth 
ritely at the Bon Soir. . . . Kai Wind- 
ing has augmented his combo to a 12- 
piece band for his current Celebrity 
Club engagement in Chicago. . . . The 
New Christy Minstrels on a Canadian 
Tour. . . . The African Room is spot- 
lighting a new singing group named 
Rick, Tinker & Scotty. . . . One of the 
busy comics around town is Bill Cos- 
by who’s just finished a stint at Basin 
Street East, another appeai-ance on 
the Paar Show and is now heading 
for the Diplomat in Miami. The laff- 
man is pacted to Warner Bros. . . . 
The Banjokers and Alan Walker keep 
things humming at the Red Onion on 
Gotham’s East side. . . . Jim Crowley 
Jr., son of the famous Notre Dame 
gridiron star, has been signed to an 
unlimited engagement at the Sign Of 
The Dove. The young pianist has 
never tossed the pigskin. . . . Joi Lan- 
sing made her New York nitery debut 


last week at the Living Room. The 
lark will also star in a new TV series 
next season with Mickey Shaunessy 
called “The Jones Boy.” 

Lyricist Edna Lewis, who put words 
to a string of hits during the past 
year, is doing the lyrics for a new 
show, “To Market To Market,” with 
book and music by Dr. Maurice Tay- 
lor and Art Gordon. The show had its 
first auditions in Philadelphia re- 
cently with another scheduled for 
Newark in the near future. . . . Tom 
O’Neil, the creator and producer of 
the two “Strange Truths” LP’s on the 
Petal label, has announced plans for 
trips into the interiors of Mexico and 
South America to find more material. 
. . . London’s assistant branch man- 
ager, Frank LaRocca, squired a new 
group called The Runarounds last 
week to a performance at St. Mi- 
chael’s Church in Brooklyn where the 
kids were well received. The group 
also has a new single, “Let Them 
Talk” on the Tarheel label. . . . Eydie 
Gorme to guest on the Jimmy Dean 
Show this week (13) and do two 
numbers from her new Columbia LP, 
“Gorme Country Style.” . . . Peggy 
Stuart Coolidge, pianist-composer 
who scored in a series of concerts be- 
hind the iron curtain last year, is pre- 
paring an album. . . . Channel 9’s 
Morty Gunty has been signed by Mer- 
cury to cut an LP on the amusing 
comments made by the kids he inter- 
views on his show. . . . Maria Randall, 
3-D wax artist, will cut an LP tagged, 
“A Tribute To The World’s Fair,” in 
which she will feature songs of seven 
countries, each to be sung in the lan- 
guage of the country. 

British songstress Kathy Keegan 
has been signed by Don Costa Pro- 


ductions to a wax pact with a first 
issue to hit the market in the very 
near future. . . . Lou Guarino, presi- 
dent of World Artists Records, sez 
Jimmy Interval’s waxing of “Daddy’s 
Little Girl,” is sure to be a hit. ... In 
addition to the many other services 
offered by Call Candy! Inc., the lass 
has now added a telephone answering 
service for the music industry. . . . 
The mystery of the Thornton Sisters 
can now be solved. The gals’ picture 
appeared in the last issue sans ref- 
erence. The girls have a new single on 


mo men: Mike Stoller leports a West 
Coast click for “Go Now” by Bessie 
Banks (Tiger). . . . Peter Hess of Ca- 
dence sez “Wake Up Little Suzy” by 
the Everly Bros is starting to show in 
Buffalo. . . . Indie promo rep Morty 
Wax sends along word that Music 
Music Music Inc. is releasing “Three 
Hallowed Words,” a tune which was 
inspired by an address by Gen. Doug- 
las MacArthur to the cadets of West 
Point. The tune was written by Cadet 
Earl Kelton. . . . Steve Harris dropped 
by to say that “The Boy With The 





EYDIE GORME 


KATYNA RANIERI 


AL MARTINO 


the Bobsan label tagged “Watch Your 
Step” backed with “Big City Boy,” 
and have played a host of college 
campuses, and been signed by Murray 
The K for a ten-day stint at the 
Brooklyn Fox Theater. ... In last 
week’s single reviews the tune “You 
Know You Don’t Want Me” by Con- 
nie Francis (MGM) was credited to 
the musical “Foxy,” — we hasten to 
advise that it is not. . . . Dave Edel- 
man, producer and A&R man for 
Cameo-Parkway, has left the label 
and is looking for a new producing as- 
signment. Dave can be reached at 437 
Rice’s Mill Road, Wyncote, Pa. He 
was the producer on the Maynard 
Ferguson, Merv Griffin and Carol 
Lawrence albums recently released. 
. . . Bobby Vinton & Vaughn Monroe 
will receive annual Mike Awards from 
KDKA Pittsburgh this week (10). . . . 
Anita Bryant on Girl Talk Feb. 17th, 
is in town to cut some sides with Bob 
Mersey producing. 

Disk Doings With The Sales & Pro- 


Beatle Hair” by the Swans (Cameo) 
looks like a winner, along with the 
debut LP, “An Evening With Carol 
Lawrence.” . . . Johnny Linde of Sur- 
vey Music hails “The Greatest” by the 
Percells (ABC-Par) as the greatest. 
. . . Atlantic’s Bob Kornheiser de- 
lighted with the rolling sales on Ben 
E. King’s “What Now My Love” (At- 
co) and the two-sided hit potential 
for “Tick Tack Toe” and “Mo Onions” 
by Booker T. & the MG’s, with the 
“Tick Tack Toe” side beginning to 
show a slight edge. . . . Jack Fine all 
smiles over the airplay building for 
“Gotta Find A Way” by Theresa 
Lindsey (Correc-Tone) and “The 
Harem” by Acker Bilk (Atco). ... At 
the Amy-Mala bailiwick things are 
buzzing for two newies tagged “It 
Ain’t No Use” by Lou Johnson (Hill- 
top) and “I Love You” by Ed Town- 
send (Marx). . . . Mike Kelly of Re- 
gina dropped by to tell us that the 
new “Jazz Portrait Of Roger Kella- 
way” is getting plenty of spins. . . . 



Ilillllllll□llllllllllll□llllllllllll□lllllllll|||□llllll||||||□lllllll|||||□l|||||||||||□ll||||||||| 

IMVID HOUSTON 

“PASSING 

THROUGH” 


DESTINED TO BE ONE OF THE 
BIGGEST SMASH HITS OF 1964! 




®‘'EPIC". Marca Ra(. T.M. PRINTED IN U.SA. 


38 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



Joe DeAngelis items that his femme 
group Lorraine & the Socialites 
(Merc) will soon have a Madara & 
White-produced deck and that the gals 
will go on a promo tour. . . . Tom 
Shannon of WGR in Buffalo writes 
that “Rock City’’ and “Red River 
Rock” by a new group called Kathy 
Lynn & the Playboys (Lawn) shows 
plenty of potential. . . . According to 
Morty Wax, Jack LaForge’s new sin- 
gle, “My Funny Valentine” backed 
with “My Nemesis” is meeting with 
huge success in the Met area — the 
88’er will also have a new LP in the 
near future debbed, “You Fascinate 
Me So.” . . . Elliot Blaine of Jubilee 
infos that “Enzo Stuarti Arrives At 
Carnegie Hall” and “The Funny Side 
Of Rudy Vallee” have both passed the 
20,000 mark. . . . Joy Records’ David 
Greenman sez he’s got hit possibilities 
in “Some Of These Days” by Andy 
Ditto and “Midnight Joey” by Lorna 
Dune. . . . Liberty’s Jim Brown sez 
Bobby Vee’s “I’ll Make You Mine” is 
a solid smash in Gotham. 

CHICAGO: 

As predicted by Chess’ sales topper 
Max Cooperstein, the Tommy Tucker 
waxing of “Hi Heel Sneakers” 
(Checker) is making its mark on the 
national scene after proving a click 
in Chi. Also gaining ground rapidly, 
according to Max, is Tony Clarke’s 
“Woman, Love and A Man” (Chess). 
. . . Congrats to Jim Golden, topper of 
USA Records, who tied the matri- 
monial knot with lovely Virginia 
Greenspon last Sunday. They’re 
honeymooning in Puerto Rico (for a 
bit of “California Sun!”). Before de- 
parting Jim info’d he has a promising 


new single on the Raynard label called 
“Roo-Buh-Doo-Buh-Doo” by The 
Statesmen. . . . Last week’s news item 
credited Nick Mass as writer of “A 
Chance To Live,” the theme for the 
Leukemia Society’s fund drive. Actu- 
ally, the writer is Tom DeCillis (Vito- 
mass Prods.) who was in town last 
week issuing a strong plea to the in- 
dustry for aid in the unceasing battle 
against Leukemia. . . . It’s always 
nice to hear from Columbia’s Gran- 
ville (Granny) White who made it a 
point to buzz us about the current 
Aretha Franklin offering “Won’t Be 
Long” (Columbia). Granny sez it’s a 
whopper! . . . Center of excitement at 
Apollo Record Dist. is a Riverside 
single by Johnny Lytle titled “Village 
Caller.” . . . Doc Siegel, an engineer 
at ABC-TV and Boulevard Recording 
Studios for many years, has left his 
local post to join Gold Star Record- 
ing (Chattaooche) in Hollywood. . . . 
Smash topper Charlie Fach raves 
about an LP sleeper on Fontana titled 
“Melodies Of Japan,” which contains 
updated readings of Japanese chil- 
dren's songs, rendered by Johnny 
Gregory. Label’s clipping a single 
from it, “Growing Up,” for release 
shortly. . . . Freelancer Paul Gallis is 
runnin’ with the new Louis Prima-Gia 
Maione offering “The Best Is Yet 
To Come” (Prima Magnagroove), 
which the pair performed on Johnny 
Carson’s TV’er (2/3); “The King Pin” 
by Vicki Belmonte (Felsted) and in- 
strumental “Corn Fed” by Bobby 
Christian (Mai). . . . Stacy Records’ 
sales head John Dolan is exceptionally 
pleased with Chi response to a new 
side by Renee Roberts titled “I Don’t 
Miss You Anymore” (Stacy), which 
was written by Sonny Schuyler whose 
hit 'medits include “Don’t Wait Too 


Long” . . . Larry Leverett arranged a 
flock of radio-TV shots, during their 
local nitery dates, for Kai Winding 
who’s appearing at the Celebrity 
Lounge and Joe Williams, current at- 
traction at A1 Williams’ (of the danc- 
ing Step Bros.) Sutherland Club. . . . 
Bill Hullinger, midwest promo man at 
newly opened B & W Dist. Corp., 
tells us the firm’s off and running 
with some promising material like 
“What’cha Wanna Do” by Johnny 
Talbot (Red Fire), “Harper’s Ferry” 
by Walt Harper Quintet (Gateway) 
and jazz LP “Harold Betters Even 
Better” (Gateway). . . . Larry Max- 
well of Maxx Records was in town 


last week promoting the new Ed 
Townsend deck “I Love You.” ... A 
couple of new faces on the local promo 
scene: Bill Casady, handling Warner 
Bros-Reprise, currently working on 
“It’s In His Kiss” by Ramona King 
(WB), “All My Trials” by Dick & 
Deedee (WB) and “I Taught Him” 
by Gloria Scott & The Tonettes; and 
John Wenzlafif, covering this area for 
Midwest-Mercury and reporting action 
on Johnny Mathis’ “Bye Bye Barbara,” 
Clyde McPhatter’s “Deep In The 
Heart Of Harlem” and “Tell Old Bill” 
bv the Chad Mitchell Trio. . . . Order 
of the day at Garmisa Dist. is the 
potent new Ray Charles single “Baby 
Don’t You Cry” (ABC). Bobby Gar- 
misa adds some praise for The 
Cordials’ “Tug Of War” (Big Top) 
and “Loan Me A Handkerchief” by 
Danny White (ABC). . . . Annette 
Funicello was a Chi visitor last week 
heralding her current Walt Disney 


movie “The Misadventures Of Merlin 
Jones.” . . . Promo men in motion: 
Frank Scardino, boasting red hot 
cargo in “Haunted House” b/w “I’m 
Traveling On” by Jackie Wilson 
(Brunswick), label bow “How Sweet 
It Is” b/w “I Rise I Fall” by Jay 
(formerly of Jay & The Americans), 
“A Little White Gardenia” by The 
Dimensions (Coral) and “01’ Man 
Mose” b/w “Christopher Columbus” 
by Cozy Cole (Coral). . . . Jim Scully, 
going all out for Garnet Mimms’ 
“Anytime You Want Me^’ (UA), “Hey 
Big Boy” by The Secrets (Philips) 
and “Crooked Little Man” by 'The 
Serendipity Singers (Philips). . . . 


Elvis Presley’s single “Kissin’ Cous- 
ins,” from the film of the same title; 
follow-up “Always In My Heart” by 
Los Indies Tabajaros and “Smoke 
Smoke Smoke (That Cigarette)” by 
Bobby “Boris” Pickett, of “Monster 
Mash” fame, are the headliners on Irv 
Brusso’s plug list. . . . Erwin Barg 
has been on the go here with the 
new Connie Francis side “You Know 
You Don’t Want Me” (MGM), written 
by Johnny Mercer. . . . Sizzlers at 
United Record Dist. are “Hand It 
Over” by Chuck Jackson (Wand), 
“He’s A Good Guy” by The Marvelet- 
tes (Tamla) and “I’m Gonna Love 
You” by The Du-ettes (M-Pac). . . . 
Barney Fields is working on Dot out- 
ings “Girl From Barbados” by Lawr- 
ence Welk, “Ghost Guitar” by George 
Cates, “Never Put It In Writing” by 

(Continued on page 40) 




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VILLAGE STOMPERS 

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^“EPIC", Marca ReR. T.M. PRINTED IN U.SA. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


39 





einiiiniiiiiiliiiniiiiinMiiiitiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMniiuiiiiiiiiitiiiMiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiini:: 

I IT HURTS ME I 

I ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR | 

Elvis Presley Music. Inc. = 

KISSIN' COUSINS i 

ELVIS PRESLEY RCA VICTOR | 

Gladys Music. Inc. = 

WHO DO YOU LOVE = 

THE SAPPHIRES SWAN | 

Hill & Range Songs. Inc. = 

MY BONNIE i 

THE BEATLES & TONY SHERIDAN MGM | 

HIM & Range Songs. Inc. = 

THE SAINTS i 

THE BEATLES & TONY SHERIDAN MGM | 

Hill & Range Songs. Inc. = 

OLE FATHER TIME i 

MILLIE FOSTER TCF I 

Brenner Music. Inc. = 

IS THIS THE BEGINNING OF THE END i 
I DEMETRISS TAPP BRUNSWICK | 

E Valley Publishers. Inc. = 

I LET GO OF MY HEART i 

I DEMETRISS TAPP BRUNSWICK | 

I Hill & Range Songs. Inc. = 

I IT AIN'T NO USE = 

I LOU JOHNSON HILLTOP I 

i Aberbach. Inc. -Green Water Music. Inc. = 

I UNDERSTAND YOUR MAN i 

I JOHNNY CASH COLUMBIA | 

i Johnny Cash Music. Inc. = 

i GOODNIGHT MY LOVE i 

I THE FOUR SEASONS VEE-JAY | 

I Quintet-Noma-Trio = 

I LONELY AVENUE (Parts I and II) 1 

= JIMMY McGRIFF SUE I 

I Progressive Music. Inc. = 

I LONELY AVENUE i 

i THE CRICKETS LIBERTY | 

§ Progressive Music. Inc. = 

1 = THE BOY WITH THE BEATLE HAIR i 

THE SWANS CAMEO = 

Hill & Range Songs, Inc. = 

I THE ABERBACH GROUP | 

I 1619 Broadway. Nrw York. NY | 

Sinmimii nitiiiiiiiiiiniiimminimmiiiminiuiuimimimiiHiiMiiiiniHimmiiS 



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“She Rides With Me” 

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Eddy Arnold 


The path that Eddy Arnold fol- 
lowed during his sensational rise from 
the soil to stardom is typically and 
thoroughly American. Its source lies 
at the very heartland of this country’s 
folk music, the Tennessee hills, and 
from the spreads to the farthest 
coasts and plains. An exclusive RCA 
Victor recording artist for the past 
twenty years, Eddy’s records have 
helped blaze this sky-rocketing path. 

Richard Edward Arnold was born 
on a farm near Henderson, a small 
town in western Tennessee, the young- 
est of four children. With instruction 
from his mother and four seventy-five 
cent lessons from a traveling musi- 
cian, Eddy learned the guitar, and 
when he was nineteen joined a small 
band performing in Jackson, Tenn. 
From there he went to St. Louis 
where he joined forces with a young 
fiddler player named Howard McNatt. 
They opened at station KWK and 
Eddy Arnold’s phenomenal career had 
begun in earnest. Over the years the 
songster has had a number of huge 
hits including “Bouquet Of Roses” 
and “Anytime.” Currently, Eddy is 
riding high on the country charts with 
“Molly.” 


Hank Williams, Jr, 


/i 

A tall youth in his mid-teens, wear- 
ing a white suit with coat lapels 
trimmed with a dressy gold braid 
hunched his shoulders slightly and 
leaned into the microphone. Country 
music pro Red Foley was standing in 
the wings chatting with a friend when 
he heard the first two lines of the 
boy’s song. His head shot around, 
then he turned to the friend and mur- 
mured half to himself, “I thought I 
heard a ghost.” 

This was the day that will go in 
show biz history books as the day 
Hank Williams, Jr. took over where 
his dad left off ten years before. With 
a few scattered appearances over 
some eight years as his only experi- 
ence, Hank, Jr. did something that 
few other artists country or pop 
would attempt a major appearance 
without benefit of a previous hit rec- 
ord. The magic of the Hank Williams 
name whipped up an electric storm of 
excitement prior to the show . . , 
everyone wanted to hear and see the 
heir of the King of the Balladeers. 

Hank, Jr. is a quiet teen-ager, not 
awed by but respectful of the trade- 
wise show biz wizards surrounding 
him. His initial MGM single, “Long 
Gone Lonesome Blues,” is currently 
developing into a strong seller in both 
the pop and country markets. 


ii«iS 


CdiA Box 


RECORD 

RAMBLINGS 


(Continued from page 39) 

Pat Boone, “Winter’s Here” by Robin 
Ward and “Hey Lonely One” by Paul 
Stefan & The Apollos. 

HOLLYWOOD: 

RCA Victor entertained deejays and 
press at the opening of their new 
star John Gary at the Crescendo. . . . 
Kellie Greene finished engagement 
with Ray Anthony in Las Vegas, and 
back in town recording new singles 
sessions. . . . Warren Lanier predict- 
ing big follow-up record for Little 
Johnny Taylor’s latest Galaxie effort, 
“Since I Found A New Love.” . . . The 
New Christy Minstrels have recorded 
promotion man Harvey Geller’s new 
lyric “Charleston is Burnin’ Down.” . . . 


is For Real People,” “Farmer’s 
Daughter” segment. . , . Fred Marsh- 
all, who produced the “Paco Chico” 
instrumental for Nocturne Records, 
jetted out to Brazil to produce 
sessions there. . . . Folk group. The 
New Breed, currently appearing at 
The Ice House, Pasadena through the 
23rd. . . . English lark, Shirley Bassey, 
including Jimmy McHugh’s “Love Me 
As Though There Were No Tomor- 
row” in her Carnegie Hall debut Feb. 
15th. . . . Billy Daniels forsaking the 
night club circuit to begin rehearsing 
some time in May, a musical adapta- 
tion of “Golden Boy,” with Sammy 
Davis Jr. as co-star. . . . Chuck Meyer 
of Decca, local promo man, spot- 
lighting Sammy Kaye’s version of 
“Charade.” Tune is up for Academy 
Award. 



JOEY WELZ 


KATHY LYNN & 
PLAYBOYS 


PEGGY STUART COOLIDGE 


The Smothers Brothers hosted a cock- 
tail party and reception for the Chad 
Mitchell Trio at the Beverly Hills 
Hotel. . . . Del-Fi Records have an- 
other hot Johnny Crawford release 
in his latest, “Cindy.” . . . The Road 
Runners in town this week from 
Denver to record an album of car 
songs. Their single “Road Runnah” on 
the Felsted label, could be the first 
big car instrumental hit, according to 
George Sherlock. . . . The Kingsmen 
in town for personal and promotion 
appearances with their big hit, “Louie 
Louis.” . . . Epic maestro, Lester 
Lanin jetted into town last weekend 
to play the Bachelors Ball at the 
Beverly Hilton. . . . The Modern Folk 
Quartet, recently recorded by Warner 
Bros. Records, have been set up for 
extensive tour by International Talent 
Associates and their personal mana- 
ger, Herb Cohen. . . . A1 Kibbler has 
departed Reprise Records and his 
future sessions will be independently 
produced by Manager-producer Lee 
Magid. . . . Columbia Records hosted 
a party for Frankie Laine following 
his opening at the Cocoanut Grove. . . . 
Bud Dain reports the Joe and Eddie 
GNP-Crescendo waxing of “Theres a 
meeting Here Tonight” again hitting 
all the local charts. . . . Prolific song- 
writer-performer, Rod McKuen has a 
total of 67 songs being released on 
record during the month of February. 
Warner Bros. Records and Buddy Cole 
held a party at the Cole home, to 
celebrate completion of the nation’s 
only studio built for theatre organ and 
stereo recording. . . . George Jay 
predicting another top female trio for 
Chattahoochee Records — The Juliet- 
tes, clicking with “Forever Loving 
You.” . . . The Smothers Brothers will 
tape the “Judy Garland Show” follow- 
ing their current engagement at the 
Troubadour. . . . Earl Grant has just 
completed his new Decca Instrumental 
album entitled, “Swinging Gently.” . . . 
Tom Virzi has joined the promo de- 
partment at Columbia. . . . Bud Doll- 
inger, at Record Merch., is launching 
all-out drive on new albums by Lena 
Horne and Dick Shawn on 20th-Fox. 
West Coast deejays are giggling with 
delight over reaction to Tony Web- 
ster’s comedy album for MGM, “The 
Marriage Counselor.” . . . Louis Prima 
and Gia Maione appeared on Johnny 
Carson’s Tonight Show on NBC, 
February 3. . . . Irwin Zucker writing 
monthly column, “As I.Z. It” for 
Sandy Becks Record Guide. . . . George 
Duning has been signed by Screen 
Gems to write the score of “Marriage 


HERE AND THERE: 


PHILADELPHIA — Cameo-Parkway’s 
Rhett Schwartz sez three new sides 
are headed right for the top — “Shimmy 
Shimmy” by the Orlons, “Be My Girl” 
by the Dovells and “The Boy With 
The Beatle Hair” by the Swans. Rhett 
also told us about a letter the firm 
received from a young lady named 
Sandi Dillinger from Toledo who re- 
quested that Cameo send her ten rec- 
ords she could use to assist her dee- 
jay brother at a record hop. It seems 
the young lass was to be paid for this 
service and needed money badly be- 
cause her parents had stopped her al- 
lowance for coming in at 4:30 A.M. 
after a date. P.S. She got the records. 
Matty “The Humdinger” Singer infos 
that Frank Fontaine spent a weekend 
in Phila. recently on a promo visit on 
behalf of his new ABC-Par LP, “How 
Sweet It Is.” In addition to a round 
of deejay and TV visits, Frankie 
called on 70 children at the Children’s 
Heart Hospital and performed at each 
and every bed and gave the kids a 
box of candy and a signed pic. Frank 
rates high in the nice guy dept. Slick 
new sides for Matty are “Baby Don’t 
You Cry” by Ray Charles, “To The 
Aisle” by Jimmy Velvet, and “How 
Blue Can You Get” by B. B. King, all 
on ABC-Par. . . . Spoke to Lillian 
Hegedus at Cameo who mentioned 
that Ian Ralfini of Pye Records in 
London and a Cameo distrib, is in 
town for meetings with Bernie Lowe 
and other disk biz reps. Bobby Ry- 
dell’s back from the San Remo Song 
Festival where he was a finalist. . . . 
Mama Musicant of Chancellor writes 
that Frankie Avalon is a top draw 
wherever he appears in Europe and 
that he was especially well received at 
the Song Festival in San Remo. Stan- 
ley Polley has been added to the Bob 
Marcucci organization and is the as- 
sociate manager to handle affairs on 
the East coast. Rocco Ochuida, re- 
covering from a heart attack of last 
summer, is making fine headway and 
is working out of his home. Rocco’s 
a Chancellor VP. 

BALTIMORE — Joey Welz, head of 
Ursula Music and Bat Records 
dropped by the CB offices recently 
during a business trip to the city. 
Joey’s working hard for his latest 
single offering, “The Whistling Man’s 
Boogie” which is doing very well in 
the Balto. area and spreading to other 
areas. 


40 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 






iiiu.i I'd' 

and ready 


to 0/1 

from twentieth 
century fox 
records 





billy ‘ ' under age 


Fox 466 


Betty Madigan 


finders keepers 

■I 

i ve got a secret 

Fox 468 The Shepherd Sisters A Bob Crewe Production 

no matter what 
the people say 

b/w 

I wish that he 
would call me 


TCF 10 


Martine Dalton & Bennie Bunn 


the glory of love 


b/w 


I need you so 


TCF 12 


Dean Barlow 



V7TS 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


41 


International Promotion Confab 



NEW YORK — Richard L. Broderick, newly-appointed merchandising manager 
of RCA Victor’s international liaison department, show his colleagues the 
new promotion poster of the label’s Ethel Ennis. Sitting are Richard Y. Crum 
(left), manager of licensee services and Gustl Breuer, manager of artists 
promo in the foreign markets. Also looking on (standing, far right) is Fred 
P. Knobel, Broderick’s assistant. 


Bertha Porter: Gal Behind The Scenes 


NEW YORK — In the world of radio 
broadcasting most of the attention, 
glamour and praise are given to the 
“names on the air,” the disk jockeys, 
newscasters and announcers whose 
names become household words in 
their local areas. 

Those behind the scenes who give 
them the wherewithal to attain recog- 
nition are rarely heard of. One such 
behind-the-scenes personality, who 
has become a legend in her own area, 
is Bertha Porter, music librarian of 
WDRC in Hartford, Conn. To her 
colleagues, Bertha Porter is the one 
vital factor in the scheme of things 
at the station that make it one of 
the most successful in the state. 

A day in the life of Bertha Porter 
reads like a day in the life of a 
high-pressure government official. 
Bertha is at her desk before 8 o’clock 
in the morning, except in the winter 
when the forecast is snow — then she 
remains at the station overnight to 
avoid missing a day’s work. Her day 
begins with the opening, sorting and 
classifying of mail pertaining to con- 
tests, promotional gimmicks and any- 
thing else of that general nature. 

WDRC is a promotion-minded sta- 
tion and the mail can include from 
three to fifteen-hundred letters a day. 
She diligently reads all tune requests 
and tries to comply with them all. 
Once this chore is out of the way, 
she turns to her programming duties 
which are gigantic in scope. Bertha 
personally selects every disk to be 
played that day and types up a play 
list for every deejay’s show in the 
order to be played. 'They are stacked 
in order for the spinner to pick up 
on his way to the studio. This task 
alone necessitates decks for four 
jockeys, each of whom is on the air 


five hours a day. No dee jay ever 
picks his own records — all he does 
is follow the music sheet. 

Bertha Porter’s duties also include 
answering the telephone when the 
station is sponsoring a contest, at- 
tending meetings with the program 
director, assisting in the devising of 
promotional gimmicks, and talking 
with promotion men from the many 
record companies. The latter is defin- 
itely a maybe situation. Bertha will 
see local promo reps any time they 
have anything new to tell her. She 
very seldom sees national promo men. 
Her explanation for this is succinct. 
“What can you tell me that I can’t 
learn from your local representa- 
tive?” All of these activities take 
until 7 or 8 o’clock at night with 
only a short break for lunch. For 
Bertha Porter, lunch is strictly social. 
If the local promo man mentions a 
record during lunch he is liable to 
finish alone, or at best in utter 
silence. 

Bertha Porter is 49 years old and 
has been doing this job for 17 years. 
She admittedly, is not overly fond 
of today’s sound in pop music, but 
she says she’s capable of completely 
sublimating her own personal tastes 
in order to choose the right disks to 
be played on the air. 

She is credited at the station with 
an uncanny sense of teen sounds, 
and, it is said, she has 90 to 95% 
average in picking sides that event- 
ually land on the Cash Box Top 100, 
most often within the Top 15. 

On a normal weekend, Bertha 
works Friday morning, takes off 
in the afternoon and returns to 
the station in the evening to work 
all night long to listen to all the 
records that have come in during the 


3 Musicals Delay 
Broadway Opening Nights 

NEW YORK — It’s a long road to 
Broadway opening night for three 
major musicals. 

“What Makes Sammy Run?,” now 
giving preview performances in New 
York, has shifted, once more, its 
official premiere from Feb. 15 to Feb. 
27. 'The show, starring Steve Law- 
rence, Sally Ann Howes and Robert 
Alda, is being re-worked by Abe 
Burrows. 

“Funny Girl,” starring Barbra 
Streisand as Fanny Brice, is still on 
the road (Philadelphia) and has de- 
layed its Broadway bow to Mar. 14 
after a previous opening date of 
Feb. 27. 

The opening of the Bert Lahr- 
starred vehicle, “Foxy,” has had a 
tough time making the Broadway 
scene for several years. It was finally 
due this week, but late last week 
opening night was shifted to Feb. 16. 

The original-cast LP’s of each show 
will be heard on three different labels. 
“Sammy” belongs to Columbia; “Fun- 
ny Girl” will be a Capitol entry; and 
RCA Victor will cut “Foxy.” 


New N.Y. Rubbery 

NEW YORK — Asfex Music, this city, 
has been formed by Billy Fox and 
Gil Askey. The pair also runs a label, 
Michele Records. Both Asfox and Mi- 
chele are housed at 218 West 47th 
St. Pacted to the label are Tobi 
Downs, a nitery-TV-stage songstress, 
Tony Middleton, Dave Brown, The 
Willows, The Relations, The Duvals, 
Jay Saunders and others. New re- 
leases on Michele will bow shortly. 


Port- Single Spoofs Beaf-les 

NEW YORK— The Port label, mar- 
keted by Jay-Gee, spoofs The Beatles’ 
sound with a new singles entry, “The 
Caterpillar Song” by a group of the 
same name recently inked by the 
diskery to a three-year pact. A “beep” 
sound, similar to the stainless steel 
blades ads on TV, edits out the Bea- 
tles name. Jay-Gee’s Elliot Blaine 
says the side is off to a solid initial 
response. 


Making It Official 



NASHVILLE — Newest additions to 
Columbia’s artist roster, the Jordan- 
aires, are shown in the above pic 
signing their long-term contract in 
the Music City. A&R executive pro- 
ducer Don Law (seated) and A&R 
producer Frank Jones (in white 
sweater) look on. The group have long 
been considered one of Nashville’s 
most talented groups, providing back- 
ground vocals as well as recording 
solo albums. The crew was previously 
on Capitol. 


week. Narrowing the total down to 
50, she listens to them again, and 
cuts the total to 20. Of these, six 
are picked, one for the station pick 
and one for each jock. If all six are 
on the same label, it makes absolutely 
no difference to her. This task is fol- 
lowed by the preparation of record- 
hop kits for the deejays so that the 
music heard at the hops is com- 
mensurate with that heard on the 
air. Nothing is left to chance. 

The station personnel at WDRC 
look upon Bertha Porter as a rara 
avis in these days of automated radio 
broadcasting, a throwback to the 
early days of radio when every mo- 
ment was carefully planned. 


Capitol’s Top 100 Showing 
Boasts More Than Beatlemania 

NEW YORK — Capitol Records is 
humming with other singles product ^ 
besides its dates by The Beatles. : 

Diskery, in the forefront of Bea- ' 
tlemania, can boast of other strong | 
Top 100 sides plus others that seem I 
to be heading that way. ’ 

Excluding The Beatles’ “I Want 
To Hold Your Hand,” the chart’s j' 
top sound for the third straight week, i 
there are three additional Capitol 
dates on the Top 100, all carrying ; 
red-bullets this week. J 

A1 Martino’s “I Love You More • 
And More Every Day” moves from i 
the number 58 spot to 31. Moving 
on to the listing for the first time j 
are The Beach Boys’ “Fun, Fun, Fun” I 
(72) and Nat Cole’s “My True Carrie i 
Love” (81). 

Two of the label’s newer singles 
are on Looking Ahead. These are 
Jodi Miller’s “He Walks Like A Man” 
and The Drew-Vells’ “Tell Him.” The 
label also reports activity of note on 
three other singles’ offerings, one of 
them tying-in with Beatlemania. Lat- 
ter entry is “My Boyfriend Has A 
Beatle Haircut” by The Haircuts. The 
label also numbers Wayne Newton’s 
“I’m Looking Over A Four Leaf 
Clover,” Bobby Darin’s “I Wonder ^ 
Who’s Kissing Her Now” and The 
Kingston Trio’s “Last Night I Had 
The Strangest Dream” as sides that 
have a Top 100 look. 

Williams Wins 3 
Radio-TV Awards 

NEW YORK — Columbia’s Andy Wil- 
liams last week copped three of the 
most coveted awards in television. The 
artist walked off with the very top 
award, “Man Of The Year,” voted 
him by the nation’s TV critics in 
Radio-Television Daily’s annual All- 
American poll. In addition, he was 
voted “Top Male Vocalist,” and The 
Andy Williams Show as “Best Musi- 
cal Show Of The Year.” 

The chanter’s latest Columbia LP, 
“The Wonderful World Of Andy Wil- 
liams” is currently riding high on the 
Top 100 Albums chart. 


BMI Scholarships Aid 
Notre Dame Jazz Fete 

NEW YORK — BMI is giving its fourth 
straight year of support to the Notre 
Dame Collegiate Jazz Festival, to be 
held April 17-18. Five scholarships to 
the 1964 National Stage Band (Damp 
have been donated by BMI to support 
the upcoming fete. A panel of judges 
will decide the award. 


New HVood Music Firms 

HOLLYWOOD — The formation of 
Gerald Music and Concept Music has 
been announced by Maurice A. Kro- 
witz, exec vp of Concept Produc- 
tions. Herbert Schwartz is manager 
cf both firms, which also include a 
label. Concept Records. Schwartz is 
currently lining up distribs for the 
diskery. All three firms are housed 
at the Samuel Goldwyn Studios in 
Hollywood. 


Columbia VP Visit's 
CB In Argentina 



BUENOS AIRES — Peter de Rouge- 
mont, Columbia Records’ vice presi- 
dent for European operations (left), 
is pictured at an interview with Cash 
Box correspondent Miguel Smirnoff 
during the diskery exec’s visit to 
Argentina. 


Manufacturers of 

THE BEATLE BOOSTER BUTTON 

KENMAR SALES INC. 

Sales Promotion Novelties 
26 Assorted Colors 

Let Us Help You Promote Your Latest Release 

Kenmar Sales Inc. 

5005 Exposition Blvd. 

Los Angeles 16, Calif. 

Phone: REpublic 1-1553 


42 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



Set NARAS— NYU Program 

NEW YORK— The program for the third annual NARAS-NYU disk industry symposium has 
been announced. Eight Wednesday night sessions will take place from Mar. 11 to April 22. 
Site will be the Lancaster Hotel, at Madison Ave. and 38th St. Each session will run from 
7 pm to 8:30 pm. Attendance fee is $75. 

The program and guest panelists include: 


SESSION I 
March 4 


THE INFLUENCE OF RECORDS ON MUSIC 

GEORGE AVAKIAN, Moderator 
John Hammond George Marek 


Bob Rolonti 


SESSION II RECORDING AND THE PERFORMING CAREER 

March 1 1 John coveny, Moderator 

Schuyler Chapin John levy 


Mitch Miller 


SESSION III THE REPERTOIRE PROBLEM: CLASSICAL AND JAZZ 

H/larch 18 Israel HOROWITZ, Moderator 

Thomas Frost Gerry Mulligan 


Bob Thiele 


SESSION IV THE REPERTOIRE PROBLEM: POPULAR, FOLK, AND OTHERS 

March 25 JOE CSIDA, Moderator 

Bob Dylan Jac Hoizman Steve Lawrence Steve Sholes 

SESSION V THE ARTIST AND THE STUDIO 

Aprjl 1 SI RADY, Moderator 

Morton Gould 


Quincy Jones 


SESSION VI COMPOSING AND ARRANGING FOR RECORDS 

April 8 ARCHIE BLYER, Moderator 

Don Costa Bob Crewe 


Gunther Schuller 


Vinton At The Villa 



HOLLYWOOD— Bobby Vinton (left) 
was a recent guest of honor at the 
Villa Capri here for a luncheon held 
in his honor by Pep Record Sales, the 
local Epic distributor. In the above 
pic he’s listening with Jack Devaney 
(center) of Cash Box to KRLA dee jay 
Ted Quillan. The chanter is currently 
riding high on the charts with “There 
I’ve Said It Again.” 


Battle Single From 
Hot-Rod Album 


SESSION VII FOCUS ON SOUND 

April 15 Tom Dowd 


SESSION VIII 
April 22 


THE CREATIVE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE FUTURE OF 
RECORDING 


Milton Babbitt 


BILLY TAYLOR, Moderator 
Tom Dowd Phil Ramone 


Jack Somer 


NEW YORK — Battle Records, the 
subsid of Riverside Records, has 
issued a single from a hot-rod sound 
LP by The Burning Slicks. Sides are 
“Midnight Drag” and “Hard Drivin’ 
Man.” According to Herman D. Gim- 
bel, head of L.P. Sales, parent com- 
pany, the single will retail at 79(^. 


Victor Hosts Luncheon 
For Sam Cooke 

NEW YORK — Sam Cooke, a consist- 
ent best-seller for RCA Victor Rec- 
ords, was the guest of honor at a 
press luncheon at Danny’s Hideaway 
last week (6) hosted by the label. 

Almost fifty disk jockeys and radio 
reps were present along with report- 
ers from Seventeen, Look, Ebony, Jet, 
Dateline, many tee i and fan maga- 
zines and tbe trades. Cooke, who 
spends much time on tour and has 
little chance to spend time in the 
Met area, was on hand to greet and 
talk with the press and radio reps. 

The chanter is currently clicking 
on the Top 100 with a new release. 
“Good News.” 


Geezinslaws In N.Y. 
Nitery Debut 


Sandy Nelson Weds 

HOLLYWOOD — Imperial drum star 
Sandy Nelson, who has a host of best- 
selling LP’s to his credit, last week- 
end tied the knot with French model 
Renee Lamoureux in Las Vegas at 
the Little Chapel of The Flowers. 

Prestige Releases 
ieatlemania Single 

NEW YORK — Prestige Records took 
its eye off the jazz-folk market for 
awhile to take advantage of Bea- 
tlemania. Diskery has released a sin- 
gles deck called “Beatle Fever” and 
“The Beatle Hop” by Bret & Terry, 
currently at New York’s Peppermint 
Lounge. Master rights were obtained 
from Claridge Music’s Frank Slay, 
who produced the portion. Prestige 
plans a big promo on the deck. 


NEW YORK — Columbia Records’ The 
Geezinslaw Brothers are currently ap- 
pearing at the Little Shooters Hooten- 
anny in New York. The group has 
been appearing at the nightclub since 
Feb. 3. 

Discovered by Arthur Godfrey in 
Austin, Texas, the folk spoofers re- 
cently debuted on Columbia with an 
LP cut “live” at the Edgewater 
Beach Hotel tagged, “The Kooky 
World Of The Geezinslaw Brothers.” 


Imperial Buys 
English Master 

HOLLYWOOD— Bob Skaff, recently- 
appointed vice-president of Imperial 
Records, last week acquired “Hippy, 
Hippy Shake,” a best-selling English 
deck, for U.S. release on Imperial. 
The single, which features the Swing- 
ing Blue Jeans, will be released na- 
tionally this week. 


New Compact Tape Producing Plant 



LOS ANGELES — Irving Katz, topper of Audio Magnetics Corp., this city, 
manufacturers of magnetic tape, last week announced the formation of an 
industrial magnetic division for the manufacture of a machine to produce 
magnetic recording tape. The new machine consists of a compact unit contain- 
ing a reverse roll coater, which will coat 4 inch widths or wider, and a slitting 
machine which cuts to % inch widths and winds directly on 3, 4, 5, or 7 inch 
reels. The plant can be shipped and set up anywhere in the world and is 
sold on a royalty basis with oxide supplied to the user as needed by the firm. 
The new division has already shipped two complete plants to foreign countries 
and currently has orders to be processed for several more units. 


King Solomon 



BALTIMORE — Atlantic’s Solomon 
Burke was recently knighted “King 
Of Rock And Soul” by WEBB-Balti- 
more deejay Rockin’ Robin on the 
stage of the Royal Theatre. The 
chanter, dressed in full regalia, is 
shown with Robin (on the extreme 
left) and other WEBB staffers. 


\ 


1 r 

' / 

FUND 

fights them all 


Your 

HEART 



Heart Attack 
Stroke 

High Blood Pressure 
Rheumatic Fever 
Inborn Heart Defects 


North American Philips 
Markets Portable Tape Unit 

NEW YORK — A new system of port- 
able tape recording, consisting of the 
new Norelco Continental ‘101’ self- 
contained, portable, battery operated, 
transistor tape recorder, and a broad 
range of optional accessories to per- 
mit recording under a variety of cir- 
cumstances, was announced last week 
by the High Fidelty Products Division 
of the North American Philips Com- 
pany. 

The Continental ‘101’ is as simple 
to operate as an ordinary radio; push 
two buttons to record, one to play- 
back. It weighs only 7 lbs for easy 
portability and uses “D” type flash- 
light batteries. Special transistor cir- 
cuitry draws less current making pos- 
sible as much as 40 hours of record- 
ing per set of batteries. 

The ‘101’ has been designed with full 
frequency response of 80-8000 cps and 
extremely low distortion which en- 
ables it to record speech and music 
with full fidelity. A treble-bass tone 
control permits the user to dial the 
exact tone desired. The ultra-sensi- 
tive microphone which is furnished 
with the ‘101’ is capable of picking 
up sounds from the farthest points 
of a classroom or concert hall. 

The new model can record from a 
radio, phonograph or TV as well as 
the microphone by means of a special 
input jack. A second input jack is 
designed to accommodate some of the 
accessories that increase the mod- 
el’s versatility: headphones for pri- 
vate listening; remote microphone 
switch which starts and stops the 
‘101’ without turning the unit off for 
candid on the spot recordings; AC 
adapter which operates the recorder 
the household current conserving 
battery life when operating the unit 
at home. 


HO T NEW R & B SING LES 
“I WANTA KNOW WHY” 

Lonesome Sundown 

Excello 2242 

• 

“COULD HAPPEN TO YOU” 

Lazy Lester 
Excello 2243 

• 

“JUST A LONELY, LONELY BOY” 

Clifford Sweet 

Excello 2244 

A BIG LP 

Nashboro 7016 

“THE CONSOLERS” 

Including their great rendition of 
“WAITING FOR MY CHILD” 
Now Avoiloble On A Single 
Nashboro 800 

Another Potent LP 
BROTHER JOE MAY'S 
NEW GOSPEL ALBUM 

Noshboro 7017 
1 with 7 LP Deal 

NASHBORO RECORDS 

177 3rd Ave. No., Nashville, Term. 



Singing Valentines 


IN A 

SENTIMENTAL MOOD 

• 

GIRL OF MY DREAMS 
THAT’S MY DESIRE 



MILLS MUSIC, INC. 

New York 19, N.Y. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


43 






Jester Meets Minstrels 



HOLLYWOOD^ — Verve’s comedian Jonathan Winters (center), who is starred 
in his own TV special, is seen hamming it up with Columbia’s New Christy 
Minstrels. The show is to be aired Feb. 20 over NBC. Winters’ new comedy LP, 
“It’s A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World,” bows on Verve this week. The New 
Christy Minstrels are currently represented on the charts with “Ramblin’. ” 


Nancy Wilson Signs 
For Nat-M Radio Ads 

NEW YORK— Nancy Wilson’s, Capi- 
tol’s big-selling songstress, has been 
signed by the Hamm’s Brewing Co. to 
be its commercial spokeswoman for 
national radio. Charles H. Stern, her 
commercial rep, said he is presently 
negotiating with other national ad- 
vertisers for similar deals. The per- 
former is currently on a swing of one- 
nighters throught the midwest, after 
which she does long-term engage- 
ments in Las Vegas, San Francisco 
and Los Angeles. 


THE BEST IN FOLK / THE BEST IN FOLK 

PRESTIGE 

THE BEST IN JAZZ / THE BEST IN JAZZ 


HITS OF THE WEEK 

SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT 

45-286 

JACK McDUFF 

BI$GEST McDuff 45 for POP AIRPLAY 
moving in Chicago, Detroit, 
Cleveland, Washington 

SEED SHACK 

45-276 

GENE AMMONS 

this GROOVY SOUND now going POP 
we PREDICT TOP 40 AIR PLAY 

BROTHER ELIJAH 

45-293 

WILLIS JACKSON 

HIT in CHICAGO— SELLING in THOUSANDS 
HOT R & B SOUND 

NEW RELEASES 

SHIRLEY SCOTT 45-292/SATIN DOLL 

STITT & MeDUFF 45-282/33-96 
KENNY BURRELL 45-281/freight trane 

Raising Temperatures All Over 

FRANK SLAY’S 1st Hit Production 
For Prestige 

BEATLE EEVER 

45-313 

BRET & TERRY 

A Hot New Sound 
HEADED FOR THE TOP 10 
DJ’s Write For Free Copies 


PRESTIGE RECORDS INC. 

203 So. Washington Ave. 

Bergenfield, N.J. 


Gene W. Conrad Dies 

NEW YORK— Gene W. Conrad, au- 
thor and playwright, died last week 
(4) at his home at 841 Serrano in 
Hollywood, Calif. The writer was 
stricken with a heart attack. 

Conrad was the author of 20 
musicals, more than 30 motion picture 
screenplays and also wrote material 
for some of the top nitery performers 
in the country. A member of ASCAP, 
his credits include the Broadway 
musicals “Helza Poppin” and “Laffing 
Room Only.” 

A Classical Playback 


NEW YORK — Aaron Copland and 
Leonard Bernstein check the score as 
they listen to a playback during their 
recent recording session of Copland’s 
“Piano Concerto.” The composer 
played the piano for the recording 
while Bernstein conducted the New 
York Philharmonic. The session was 
held a week ago with Columbia 
Masterworks’ music director John 
McClure as producer. 



Award For Tony 


NEW YORK — Tony Bennett was 
Mayor Robert F. Wagner’s guest at 
Grade Mansion last week for cere- 
monies in which the Mayor presented 
him with a proclamation naming the 
chanter an honorary citizen of the 
Boys Towns of Italy, a special award 
citing his work for the needy youth of 
Italy. With the Mayor (left) and 
Bennett, who stars in a Carnegie Hall 
concert Feb. 21st, is Mrs. Manolita 
Doelger of the Italian consulate. The 
songster is currently putting his hopes 
in his recently-released Columbia LP 
of “The Many Moods Of Tony.” 



NYC Proclamation 
Salutes Songwriters 

NEW YORK — A proclamation by the 
City of New York in tribute to 
America’s songwriters will be pre- 
sented by Mayor Robert F. Wagner 
to Stanley Adams, president of the 
American Society of Composers, 
Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) 
this Thursday (13), marking the 50th 
Anniversary of the society’s organi- 
zation. 

ASCAP, organized by the late Vic- 
tor Herbert and a group of his fellow 
writers to license their music for use 
in all commercial enterprises, began 
with a charter membership of 192 
members. The Society today numbers 
more than 9500 writers and publishers 
of music, and includes the outstand- 
ing musical talent in our nation. 

Adams will present Mayor Wagner 
with a framed autograph and cari- 
cature by William Auerbach Levy of 
the late Victor Herbert to commemo- 
rate the occasion. 


Morty Wax Merges Promo 
Acfivifies Under One Roof 

NEW YORK — The Morty Wax promo 
office has consolidated its various 
services under the banner of “The 
House of Wax.” 

One wing of the new, three-dept. 
operation is what firm owner Morty 
Wax calls The National Record Pro- 
motion Network, which handles disk 
promo, trade paper publicity and dis- 
trib laison in major markets across 
the country via field reps. A second 
wing, called Morty Wax Promotions, 
specializes in public relations via 
trade paper coverage and radio and 
TV interviews. A third wing is a 
custom pressing and production di- 
vision. All these enteprises are located 
at 1733 Broadway, this city. 


Del-Fi Inks Sandy Descher 
To Five-Year Pact 

HOLLYWOOD — Bob Keene, president 
of Del-Fi Records, has announced the 
signing of songstress Sandy Descher 
to a five-year pact with the label. The 
18-year old lark has also been signed 
by Four Star TV to appear opposite 
Del-Fi songster Johnny Crawford in 
his new TV series, “Malcolm.” Coinci- 
dentally, the singer’s new single is 
tagged, “Sandy.” 

Keene also announced that the 
label is re-releasing a single dubbed 
“Hippy Hippy Shake” by Chan 
Romero. The tune is a current best- 
seller in England by the Swingin’ 
Blues Jeans and has a Beatles’ sound. 


Castle In Cash Box 



NEW YORK — English music hall star 
Roy Castle stopped up at the Cash 
Box editorial offices last week to pro- 
mote his recently-released Warner 
Bros, album of “Gary Moore Presents 
Roy Castel.” Standing (left to right) 
in the above pic are Castle, CB editor 
Ira Howard and WB promo rep Mar- 
vin Deane. 


David Carroll Elected 
Pres. Of Chi NARAS 

CHICAGO — A new slate of officers 
has been elected at the Chicago 
chapter of NARAS. The disk society’s 
board of governors elected David Car- 
roll as president; William R. Traut, 
1st vp; Mike Simpson, 2nd vp; Joseph 
P. Wells, secretary; A. B. Clapper, 
treasurer. It was also announced that 
John Scott Trotter, national president 
of NARAS, will be on hand at the 
chapter’ next monthly meet scheduled 
for Feb. 18. Trotter will arrive from 
New York, where he’s to attend a 
meet of the New York chapter’s 
board of governors the day before. 


N.Y. NARAS Signs-Up 
Host Of New Members 

NEW YORK— Wesley Rose, Paul 
Evans, John Gary, Jean “Toots” 
Thielemans are Pauline Rivelli (editor 
of newly-formed Jazz Magazine) are 
among the new members of the New 
York Chapter of NARAS, the disk 
awards society. 

In announcing the new member- 
ships, George Avakian, president of 
the chapter, said that the recruitment 
showed the “growing awareness of 
the Academy’s stature and importance 
in the field.” 

Other recent new members in the 
active category include Joan Deary, 
Ben Deutschman, George Estes, Jr., 
Larry Finley, Dick Gardner, Paul 
Goodman, Roger Hall, Kenneth Ham- 
ann, Bernard Keville, Bob Lissauer, 
Stephen Little. 

Also, Millard Martin, Bernie Miller, 
Don Miller, Ernie Oelrich, Skid Red- 
wine, Don Richter Herb Rosen, 
Anthony Salvatore, Nick Sangiamo, 
Jr., Bob Simpson, John Sornmerer, 
Joseph Stelmach James Stone and 
Leslie Young. 

The New York Chapter recently 
instituted a stepped-up membership 
drive aimed towards all branches of 
creativity within the recording field. 


Zanelli Heads Crewe's 
Artist Management Firm 

NEW YORK — Dan Crewe, vp of Bob 
Crewe Productions and Genius, Inc., 
has announced the appointment of 
Lew Zanelli as manager of Barnegat 
Enterprises, Inc., artist management 
firm. In addition to handling artists 
not directly associated with the Genius 
group of companies, Zanelli will guide 
the professional careers of talent 
contracted to indie producer Bob 
Crewe. These include Atlantic’s Shir- 
ley Matthews, Amy’s Tracey Dey, 
20th Century Fox’ Diane Renay and 
others. 


Sweet Music 



NEW YORK — Laughman Jackie 
Gleason (right) points out to his TV 
cohort Frank Fontaine the fine points 
of the tune, “How Sweet It Is,” com- 
posed by Gleason. The new Fontaine 
LP, just released by ABC-Paramount, 
is also tabbied “How Sweet It Is.” 


44 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 







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Cash Box — February 15, 1964 






Cadence Salutes Lenny Welch In Buffalo 



BUFFALO — Cadence chantei’ Lenny Welch was the guest of honor at a cocktail 
bash during a recent appearance here. The songster, who zoomed to the top 
ten of the singles chart with his “Since I Fell For You” disking, is pictured 
with (left to right) Pete Hess, sales and promo manager at Cadence; WGR PD 
Pat Patterson; Sonny Jim Kelsey of WUFO; Rod Rodney of WKBW, and 
Bruce Godfryd and Steve Brodie of Best and Gold Distributors. 


ABC-Par Adds Promo Man 
For Southern Territory 


New Year Means 
New Items From 3M Co. 


NEW YORK — Sonny Woods has been 
named to handle promo activities in 
the South for ABC-Paramount 
Records. Woods, pi’eviously an an- 
nouncer on radio station WJLD in 
Birmingham, will cover Texas, Louisi- 
ana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, 
Alabama and other ai-eas. His promo 
experience includes stints with Tamla- 
Motown, Peacock, Roulette and Chess. 


Tony Webster To Pen 
"That Was Week" Script 

NEW YORK — Tony Webster, Emmy 
Award recipient and author-producer 
of his own comedy album on Verve, 
“The Marriage Counselor,” has been 
brought in to script the NBC TV’er, 
“That Was The Week That Was.” 


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NEW YORK— The 3M Company, 
manufacturers of “Scotch” brand 
sound recording tapes, is providing the 
maximum amount of tape footage on 
a five-inch reel, by offering the self- 
threading real as an accessory, and 
by introducing to dealers a new dis- 
play rack for carded accessories. 

“Scotch” brand No. 290, a triple- 
length sound recording tape, now 
comes in 1,800-foot lengths on five- 
inch reels to provide the greatest 
amount of playing time for recorders 
that will accept only five-inch reels or 
smaller. The triple-length tape is 
already available in 600-foot lengths 
on 3 14 -inch reels for transistorized 
recorders and in 3,600-foot lengths on 
seven-inch reels for maximum, un- 
interrupted recording time. 

The 1,800-foot tape will provide up 
to three hours of recording at 3% 
inches per second recording speed or 
half that at 7% inches per second. The 
additional playing time was made 
possible by use of an ultrathin but 
very strong one-half mil tensilized 
polyester base. It is splice-fz-ee and 
treated with 3M’s exclusive silicone 
lubricant, which reduces recorder head 
wear. 

W. H. Madden, 3M Sales Manager 
for sound recording tapes, said the 
“Scotch” brand No. 290 tapes “will 
wear up to 10 times longer than con- 
ventional tapes, a quality which is 
essential for repeated use.” 

The oxide is less abrasive, he said, 
and has a better high frequency 
response than conventional tapes. 

List price of the new tape is $6.95 
per roll. 

3M’s new self -threading reel be- 
comes available as an accessory item. 
Madden calls it “the most significant 
development in reel design in the 
history of magnetic tapes.” 

The new reel is threaded by laying 
the tapes between the flanges near the 
hub, eliminating any fumbling with 
slots or hooks. As the reel spins, the 
tape winds automatically around the 
hub. In addition, tapes unwind freely 
and easily off the reel. 

A collar snaps tight to protect the 
tape from dust and damage. At $1.50 
list pz'ice, each reel includes write-on 
labels for both reel and collar. 

With purchase of 48 carded ac- 
cessory items, 3M will supply free 
to dealers an accessory display unit 
that can be hung on a pegboard or 
display board or can be mounted on a 
wall with screws or mounting tape. 
The carded accessories include splicing 
tape, sensing tape and leader and 
timing tape in two colors, yellow and 
white. 


K-Doe To Peacock 

NEW YORK — Ernie K-Doe, of 
“Mother-In-Law” fame, has inked a 
long-term pact with Peacock Records, 
according to Don Robey, the label’s 
topper. Plans are underway for a 
session and first release in the near 
future. 


Start Drive For Scholarship 
Memorial For Heilicher's Dad 

PHILADELPHIA— Labels and dis- 
tribs are being called upon to help 
create a “living memorial” in honor 
of the late Menaheim Heilicher, who 
was the father of Amos Heilicher, 
the distrib and president of ARMADA. 

Philadelphia distrib David Rosen is 
spearheading the effort to establish a 
scholarship to Camp Ramah (in the 
U.S. or Israel) for deserving students 
at the Minneapolis Talmud Torah, 
where Heilicher’s father was a mem- 
ber of the faculty for 44 years. He 
was killed in an auto accident last 
year. 

Rosen has mailed more than 1,000 
letters to labels and distribs to solicit 
their support. 


Dot's TV Mag Ad Pulls 
Big Catalog Offer Response 

NEW YORK — Dot Records told read- 
ers of last week’s issue of TV Guide 
an LP discount story and catalog and 
has received an immediate response. 

A full-page ad in the publication, 
whose circulation is about 10 million, 
stated that the label was offering a 
25% discount on its product until 
Feb. 29. Also, readers were given info 
on obtaining a 52-page, full-color LP 
catalog for 10^^. According to Dot’s 
Jim Bailey, the label received 1,000 
requests over a period of two days. 

Consumers take advantage of the 
25% discount through retail outlets. 


Caedman's Bard Sefs Go 
On Radio For Isf Time 

i NEW YORK— Caedmon Records is 

i 

I allowing airplay of its Shakespeare 
! Recording Society productions for the 
first time. 

Since 1960, when SRS began its 
sez'ies of complete, uncut disks of 
, Bard works, the label has barred 
broadcasting of the sets, but in view 
! of the 400th anniversary of Shakes- 
! peare’s birth in 1964, it has decided to 
! allow programming, 
i SRS’ 20 albums of plays and poetry 
by the Bard will be available to radio 
stations under two plans: the first 
allows for complete usage of all SRS’ 
drama recordings for $125 perform- 
ance fee, plus cost of albums, specially 
priced for outlets; the second plan, 
[ on single play clearance basis, calls 
! for a $10 broadcast fee, which entitles 
the outlet to play one of the dramas 
plus extra cost for the package (still 
specially priced). 


Pillow Talk 



NASHVILLE — Marvin Hughes (left), 
A&R director for Capitol Records, is 
pictured with songster Ray Pillow 
(seated) and agent Joe D. Taylor 
during the signing of Pillow to a wax 
pact with the label. The singer, a 
native of Lynchburg, Virginia, and a 
frequent guest on the Grand Ole Opry, 
will cut his first session here this 
month. 


Beauty & The Beard 



NEW YORK — Ann-Margret and A1 
Hirt are shown above digging a play- 
back of “Beauty And The Beard,” 
their initial RCA Victor album to- 
gether which is already riding the 
charts. The recently-released set 
marks the singing debut of Hirt, who, 
heretofore, has let his horn speak for 
him. Hirt is currently clicking big in 
the singles department with “Java.” 


Columbia Signs Lark 



HOLLYWOOD — Linda Lloyd, a vocal 
newcomer, has been inked by Colum- 
bia Records, according to Irving 
Townsend, vp on the west coast. The 
performer was brought to Columbia’s 
attention by Ed Kleban, label producer 
who will cut her in Hollywood. While 
attending Mississippi Southern Col- 
lege and Florida State Univ. (from 
which she graduated), the performer 
participated in a number of musical 
activities, including that of vocalist 
with the student dance bands. She’ll 
cut her first sides soon. Sitting (left 
to right) in the above pic are Town- 
send, the artist and Kleban. 


A WIP Promo Visit 
For Verve's Wynton Kelly 



PHILADELPHIA — Verve jazz artist 
Wynton Kelly (middle) is shown with 
Dick Carr (top) program director at 
WIP and deejay Tom Brown during a 
promo visit to the station on behalf 
of his new LP, “Cornin’ In The Back 
Door.” Kelly has been playing at the 
Show Boat Club here. 


46 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



Cdsh Box 



TOP 100 SINGLES 

(ALPHABETIZED) 


* Denotes Red Bullet 


Abigail Beecher *39 

A Fool Never Learns 13 

A Letter From Sherry *29 

Anyone Who Had A Heart 12 

As Usual 22 

Baby I Love You 55 

Big Town Boy 95 

Bird Dance Beat B6 

Blue Winter 76 

Bye Bye Barbara *62 

California Sun *15 

Can Your Monkey Do The Dog *52 

Charade 60 

Come On 27 

Cornin' On 75 

Daisy Petal Pickin' 30 

Dawn (Go Away) *10 

Dominique 64 

Drag City 49 

For You 8 

Forget Him 25 

From Me To You 73 

Fun, Fun, Fun 72 

442 Glenwood Avenue *54 

Girl From Spanish Town 97 

Glad All Over 71 

Going Going Gone 32 

Gonna Send You Back To Georgia 42 

Good News *33 

Harlem Shuffle 36 

Have You Ever Been Lonely 84 

He Says The Same Things To Me 58 

He'll Have To Go 71 

Here Comes The Boy 92 

Hey Little Cobra 5 

High Heel Sneakers *59 

High On The Hill 100 

Hooka Tooka 16 

I Can't Stop Talking About You 57 

I Didn't Know Whot Time It Was 87 

I'll Be There (To Bring You Love) 93 

I'll Remember (In The Still Of The Night) 70 
I Love You More And More Each Day . . *31 

I Only Want To Be With You *23 

It's All In The Gome 24 

It's No Sin 47 

I Wont To Hold Your Hand 1 

I Wish You Love *38 

Java *6 

Leaving Here 77 

Little Boxes 74 


Little Boy 96 

Live Wire *56 

Long Lonesome Blues 83 

Louie, Louie 18 

Love With The Proper Stranger 94 

Miller's Cove *65 

My Bonnie *69 

My True Carrie Love 81 

Navy Blue *28 

Nitty Gritty 45 

Oh Baby Don't You Weep 34 

Out Of Limits 7 

Pain In My Heart 66 

Penetration *44 

Pink Dominoes 91 

Please, Please Me *43 

Popsicles & Icicles 21 

Puppy Love 88 

Rip Van Winkle *79 

Roberta 78 

See The Funny Little Clown *26 

She Loves You *3 

Shelter Of Your Arms S'S 

Shimmy Shimmy *68 

Since I Fell For You 48 

So For Awoy 67 

Somewhere 51 

Southtown U.S.A 20 

Stay 98 

Stop And Think It Over *17 

Surfin' Bird 19 

Talking About My Boby 14 

That Girl Belongs To Yesterday 50 

There I've Said It Again 11 

Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um 4 

Understand Your Man 99 

Vaya Con Dios 53 

What Kind Of Fool (Do You Think I Am) *9 

What's Easy For Two *63 

Where Did I Go Wrong 90 

Whispering 46 

Who Do You Love *37 

Woman, Love And A Man 85 

Worried Guy 80 

Wow Wow Wee 40 

You Don't Own Me 2 

You'll Never Walk Alone 41 

Young And In Love 89 

You're No Good 61 


I 




Columbia Unveils 6 
4 Stereo Tapes, Feb. 

NEW YORK — Columbia Records has 
announced that six four-track stereo 
tapes have been released for Feb., in- 
cluding’ the original cast of “The Girl 
Who Came To Supper,” the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra conducted by Eu- 
gene Ormandy in a program of Proko- 
fiev Favorites, “Tbe Wonderful World 
of Andy Williams,” “Till The End Of 
Time” by Jerry Vale, “The Return Of 
The Gunfighter” by Marty Robbins, 
and “In A Tender Mood” by Gordon 
Jenkins. 


Berry Eyes 
New Talent 

NEW YORK — Eddie Warner, the or- 
ganist who runs the Berry label, based 
in Flossmoore, 111, is conducting a 
search for new and undiscovered 
talent for his company. He’s also on 
the look-out for demos and tapes to 
audition. Berry is located at 2612 
Central Drive in Flossmoore. 


A Mathis DispI ay 



LOS ANGELES — Johnny Mathis 
poses with the painting of himself 
which is used on the cover of his new 
Mercury LP, “Tender Is The Night.” 
With the chanter is Ethan Carson, 
manager of the Music City stores. 


April & Nino Cut "Stardust^^ 

NEW YORK. — Nino Tempo & April 
Tempo dip into the evergreen catalog 
again in their latest Atco singles date. 
Pair has cut “Stardust” as a follow- 
up to two smash revivals of “Deep 
Purple” and “Whispering.” On the 
date, Nino adds a tenor sax opening 
to his singing chores. Before making 
the grade with his sister, he was a 
busy west coast jazz musician. 


Jay Not On “America'^ 

NEW YORK — In last week’s story on 
Coral Records’ signing of Jay, fox-m- 
erly of Jay & The Amei-icans, it was 
noted that the songster had been in 
on the group’s hit side, “Only In 
America.” Actually, Jay, who left the 
group about a year and a half ago, 
did not pai’ticipate on that date. The 
group, however, retained the full Jay 
& The Americans tag following the 
original Jay’s departure. 


Aravel Inks 
2 Folk Artists 

NEW YORK — Bob Borchardt, vice- 
president of Aravel Records, a Long 
Island City folk-oiuented diskei-y, an- 
nounced last week that the fii-m had 
signed Alex Lukeman, a folksinger 
who has been performing in and 
around New York dui-ing the past 
several years, and folkster A1 Singer, 
a former Milwaukee deejay, to ex- 
clusive recording contracts. Boi’chardt 
noted that the label will release al- 
bums featuring the new artists within 
the immediate future. 


New W. Coast Rubbery 

PALM SPRINGS, CALIF.— Charlotte 
Cromwell of Palm Springs has formed 
a publisher company called Seven 
Palms Music at 501 S. Calle Encilia. 
Copyrights will be released under her 
diskery, Lynne Records, which will hit 
the market with six releases this 
month. 


Hickory Signs 
Lonnie Donegan 

NASHVILLE — Hickory Records has | 
announced that it has inked British | 
wax artist Lonnie Donegan to a label 
wax nact. The chanter, who records 
for Pye in England, will be released 
exclusively on the Hickory label in 
the U.S., and the label will have ac- 
cess to all Pye disks made by the 
chanter in England. 

Louis Benjamin, managing director 
of Pye, and international manager 
Ian Ralfini, will visit the U.S. to ex- 
ploit the release, and the songster will 
visit here in the Spring for I’ecording, 
TV and personal appearances. 


Ole Georg To 
Capitol Custom Post 

HOLLYWOOD— Ole Georg, former 
A&R producer for Capitol Records in 
Copenhagn, has joined Capitol Custom 
Services in Hollywood. Georg will 
serve clients in the field of custom 
recording, background music and 
premium records. 

Georg, who will i-epoi-t to Bud 
Harden, director of Capitol Custom 
Services in the Capitol Tower, has 
had a wide variety of experience in 
the music field ranging from classical 
to popular music. He was the founder 
of the Danish National Youth Sym- 
phony Orchestra and one of the men 
behind the first Danish popular music 
station. Radio Mercur. 


Nat Vincent: 

Very Much Alive 

NEW YORK — Nat Vincent, the vet 
pubbery exec, is very much alive. The 
latest addition of Who’s Who in 
Counti-y Music noted that Nat was 
born in 1889 and died in 1962, but be 
is still active, at 74, with his own 
publishing firm, NV Music (ASCAP), 
in Hollywood. He suffered blindness 
in 1960 from Glacoma, retiring shoi’tly 
after from Southern Music. Nat, 
who has been on the music business | 
scene for 54 yeai-s, recently foi’med 
NV Music. 


Johnny Marks Writing 
Score For Yule TV'er 



NEW YORK— Johnny Marks, of “Ru- 
dolf The Red-Nosed Reindeer” fame ! 
is at work on the score for a big one- j 
hour Chi’istmas show to be pi'esented 
next Yuletide on TV. 

The color show, produced by Video- : 
craft Int’l Ltd. on film, will be shown 
over the NBC netwoi'k on a Sunday 
close to Xmas. 

There will be eight songs; seven 
new songs in addition to “Rudolph” 
and background music which will in- 
clude two Mai'ks copyi’ights, “Rockin’ 
Around The Christmas Tree” and “I 
Heal’d The Bells On Christmas Day.” 

Mai’ks has just returned from Eng- 
land where he started the recording of 
the score. All of Marks’ creations are 
in his St. Nicholas Music catalog. 


Les Cooper To Dimension, 
Screen Gems-Columbia Music 



NEW YORK — Les Cooper has signed 
artist & writer pacts with Dimension 
Records and Screen Gems-Columbia 
Music. In a dual role as writer and 
artist. Cooper had a big hit awhile- 
back with “Wiggle Wobble” on the 
Everlast label. He has also written 
successful tunes for other acts. His 
first outing for Dimension will be 
“Swobblin’ ” and “Motor City.” In the 
photo. Cooper (center) is signed to 
the Dimension pact by label veep Walt 
Maguire (left). Looking on is Sam 
Silverhardt, Cooper’ manager. 


Briarwood Singers Booked 
Info Carnegie Hall 

NEW YORK — The Briarwood Singers, 
who recently debuted on United Art- 
ists Records with an LP, “Well Well 
Well,” have become the third label 
pactees to be booked into Carnegie 
Hall within a one-week period. The 
folksters will appear with the Beatles 
on Feb. 12. 

Other UA artists recently signed to 
appear at the famed concert hall are 
Shirley Bassey who will give a con- 
cert on Feb. 15 and the husband and 
wife team of Riz Ortolani and Katyna 
Ranieri, who appeared on Feb. 8th. 
Ortolani is a UA pactee. 


Tommy Roe Skedded For 
5fh Show With Beatles 

NEW YORK — ABC-Paramount’s 
Tommy Roe, currently riding the top 
100 with his disking of “Come On,” has 
been tapped by the Beatles to appear 
with them at the Coliseum in Wash- 
ington, D.C., on Feb. 11. 

The American chanter has appeared 
with the famed Liverpool group four 
times before in England. 


HEADING UP TO 

“STAY” 

4 SEASONS 

Vee Jay 582 


By 



1449 S. MICHIGAN AVE. 
CHICAGO 16, ILL. 


SALES! SALES! SALES! 

Bobby Lord 

$INGS 

LIFE CAN HAVE 
MEANING 

HICKORY 1232 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


47 


Presentation 



NEW YORK— Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy (left) recently accepted from 
George Marek, veep and general man- 
ager of RCA Victor Records, the first 
copy of a recording of Boston’s Me- 
morial Tribute to the late John F. 
Kennedy. The memorial consisted of a 
Solemn Pontifical Mass celebrated in 
the Cathedral of the Holy Cross and a 
performance of the Mozart Requiem 
by the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
and 180-voice chorus, directed by 
Erich Leinsdorf. Normal proceeds 
from the 2-LP album will go to the 
John F. Kennedy Library in Boston. 
Sen. Kennedy accepted the recording 
on behalf of the entire Kennedy 
family. 


WB^s Modern Folk Quartet' 
Doing Extensive P.A/s ' 

NEW YORK — The Modern Folk i 
Quartet, heard on Warner Bros. Rec- ! 
ords, is on the p.a. move. | 

Following an appearance on the Ed 
Sullivan Show on Feb. 2, the crew set- 
out on an extensive tour, booked 
through International Talent Associ- 
ates and its personal manager. Herb 
Cohen. The quartet, which combines 
traditional songs and instrumentation 
with a lively, modern sound, is making 
a two-week appearance at Washing- 
ton, D.C.’s Shadows Club, following 
p.a.’s throughout the east coast and 
into Canada. 

The Ford Motor Co. has also en- 
gaged the crew for a four-week stint, 
travelling across the country from 
April 10 to May 2. 

The foursome has just finished re- 
cording a new album for Warner 
Bros, for release early in March. 


UHiiiMitiiiininniMiiiiMitiniiiiniiiiitMiininnitniiiMiiiiMiininiitiiiiiiMiMiMiiit^ 
I The Next Big One From Europe 1 
I Breaking In All Markets — I 

I “HEIMAT DEINE 
STERNE” 

The Blue Boys 

I Universe #1001 | 

I UKIVERSE RECORDS I 

I 6362 Hollywood Blvd. I 

I Hollywood, Calif. | 

uiiiiiiMniniitiuiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiinriitiiiiiiiHtiiniiiiiMiiininiitiiiiiinitiiriiiiiii.^ 


The Big Sleeper of ’64! 

"RIP VAN 
WINKLE" 

ROULEHE RECORDS 

THE DEVOTIONS 

Roulette 4541 

1631 B'way, N. Y., N. Y. 


48 


Welk Signs*Up For 
10th Year On TV 

NEW YORK — Lawrence Welk and 
His Champagne Music Makers will 
start their 10th consecutive year on 
TV next season. The ABC network 
show has been renewed for another 
52 weeks by the J. B. Williams Co. 
Welk’s present sponsorship contract 
expires June 6. The following Sat (13) 
will be the start of the new pact. 


Supreme Names Sales Head 

GLENDALE, CALIF.— Bob Cotterell 
has been named sales manager of 
Supreme Records, according to Paul 
Mickelson, president of the label. 
Supreme, in its third year, releases 
religious, classical, educational and 
children’s records. Cotterell is past 
sales manager of Sacred Records and 
has had associations with BMI, Amer- 
ican Marketing Association, Christian 
Released Time Education and Bel Air 
Presbyterian Church Choir. 

Supreme plans an “aggressive” 
sales program this year, and will 
develop new artists with varied 
market potential. 

Hurrah Markets 10 
Low-Priced Albums 

NEW YORK — Budget-priced Hurrah 
Records, a subsid of Kimberly 
Records, is out with a group of 10 
albums taking-in a broad range of 
musical styles. 

Dates are: “Square Dances with 
Calls” by Carl Journell, “Latin Magic 
of Eddie Cane and His Orch.,” “West 
Side Story,” “Sound of Music,” “Russ 
Case Features a Showcase of Stephen 
Foster,” “Dublin — A Symphony of 
Strings,” “Italy — A Symphony of 
Strings,” “Percy Faith & Russ Case 
& Their Orchestras;” “24 Karat Gold 
— The Trumpet of Don Goldie,” and 
“Mariache Time.” 


Anita Carter Cuts 
Folk LP In New York 

NEW YORK— The Nashville Sound 
came to New York recently in the 
person of Anita Carter of the famed 
Carter Family. The performer, 
brought to Gotham by Shelby Single- 
ton, Mercury A&R director and vp, 
cut an album of folk songs under the 
direction of Milt Okun, the folk music 
director-arranger who has cut such 
top folk names as The Chad Mitchell 
Trio and Peter, Paul & Mary. Idea 
behind the move was to give the artist 
a broader market sound. 


I Pye's N.Y. Rep Places 
I Lot'S Of Masters Here 

NEW YORK — Beatlemania has ap- 
parently given Irv Chezar, New York 
rep of England’s Pye label, an easier 
time of it placing masters here from 
English diskery. 

In recent weeks, Chezar has placed 
the following sides: “Pins & Needles” 
by The Searchers, the current number 
1 best-seller in England, on Kapp; 
“Theme from ’Dr. Strangelove’ ” by 
Lori Johnson on Colpix; “I Could 
Write a Book” by The Chants on 
Cameo; “That Boy of Mine” by The 
Breakaways on London; and “The Boy 
You’re Kissin’ ” by Mark Wynter and 
“Come On In” by The Sundowners, 
both on Jamie. In addition, a new 
Kenny Ball release is due out soon 
i on Kapp. 


Co^ Box 


The Cash Box "Sure Shots" highlight records which reports from retail 

nation indicate are already beginning to sell quantity or else give every indication 9 

^^442 GLEN WOOD AVEN U E" 

PIXIES THREE Mercury 72208 

“HI-HEEL SNEAKERS'^ 

TOMMY TUCKER Checker 1607 

-bye bye BARBARA'' 

JOHNNY MATHIS Mercury 72229 

"GLAD ALL OVER" 

DAVE CLARK FIVE ^pic 9656 

"FUN, FUN, FUN" 

BEACH BOYS Capitol 5118 

"BLUE WINTER" 

CONNIE FRANCIS ^GM 13214 

"LEAVING HERE" 

EDDIE HOLLAND Motown 1052 

"RIP VAN WINKLE" 

DEVOTIONS Roulette 4541 

"WORRIED GUY" 

JOHNNY TILLOTSON MGM 13193 

"MY TRUE CARRIE LOVE" 

NAT COLE Copitol 5125 

"HE'LL HAVE TO GO" 

SOLOMON BURKE Atlantic 2218 


I Tenn. Gov. Proclaims 

I 

NEW YORK — Governor Frank G. 
Clement of Tennessee (right) issued 
an official proclamation last week 
designating the month of February 
as “Eddy Arnold Month” throughout 
the state. 

The document honoring the singer, 

1 signed by the Honorable Clement, 
reads as follows; 

Whereas, Eddy Arnold is a Colonel 
on my staff and a distinguished na- 
tive of Tennessee who in February 
celebrates his twentieth anniversary 
as a recording artist for the RCA 
Victor Company; and 

Whereas, Colonel Arnold has risen 
from a Tennessee farm boy to the 
very pinnacle of success as an enter- 
tainer and folk artist; and 

Whereas, On numerous occasions 
Colonel Arnold has served as unoffi- 
cial ambassador from Tennessee, 
representing his state in the highest 
of its proud traditions; and 

Whereas, He has brought countless 
hours of pleasure and enjoyment to 
millions of people through wholesome 
and refined entertainment: 

Now, Therefore, I, Frank G. Cle- 
ment, as governor of the State of 
Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the 
month of February, 1964, as Eddy 

Lou Monte Starts 
Leukemia Fund In 
Memory Of Son 

NEW YORK- — Lou Monte has formed 
the Louis Scaglione, Jr. Leukemia 
Foundation in memory of his son who 
died from the disease on Jan. 4 at the 
age of 21. The performer will sponsor 
the charity out of New York. Dona- 
tions to the foundation can be sent 
at this time to 30 Chuckanutt Drive, 
Oakland, New Jersey. 


“Eddy Arnold Month’’ 



Arnold Month in Tennessee and do 
urge all of our citizens to give special 
recognition to the talents and ac- 
complishments of this distinguished 
native son.” 

Arnold is currently on a promotion 
and publicity tour for RCA Victor 
Records, which is also honoring him, 
and celebrating his 20th year on the 
label with a powerful merchandising 
“February Is Eddy Arnold Month on 
RCA Victor.” 

In addition to a brand new Eddy 
Arnold album, “Folk Song Book,” 
seven of Arnold’s 16th RCA Victor 
catalog packages have been selected 
for inclusion in the celebratory nation- 
wide campaign. 


Correction 

NEW YORK — In last week’s story on 
Lenny Hodes’ new firm, English lyric 
credits for “Never On Sunday” should 
have read Billy Towne. 

Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


FOR THE M YEAR IN A ROW! 


MORE PAGES OF 
ADVERTISING 

IN 



Cash 

Box 


MW 


mi 

/ / / 

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WM p<J 
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Gdsh Box 



HiHi 
I' ” 

pspi 

#««»•» 

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.BBii 




THAN ANY OTHER 
MUSIC TRADE 
PUBLICATION 

CASH BOX. IS #1 IN PAGE ADVERTISING 
IN THE RECORDED MUSIC. JUKE BOX I 
AND AMUSEMENT GAME FIELDS IN THE WORLD. 






1 w 

i 6 




1963 TOTAL: 

CASH BOX....1880y4 pages 
BILLBOARD . . . 1767 pages 




i>' % 






*In the endeavor to be as impartial as 
possible this survey credits aU of * 

Billboard^s small books as full pages 
■when in reality they are ya price of « 

the regular edition. 

FOR THE BEST ADVERTISING BUY . . 
BUY CASH BOX 

The #1 Record weekly in every 
important market in the world. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 




siiiiliii 



COUNTRY D.J. 

REGIONAL RECORD REPORTS 


MIKE HOYER 
KMA 

Shenandoah, Iowa 

1. Before I’m Over You (Loretta Lynn) 

2. Lost Day In The Mines (Dave Dudley) 

3. Peel Me A Nonner (Roy Drusky) 

4. D. J. For A Day (Jimmy C. Newman) 

5. The Morning Paper (Billy Walker) 

6. Begging To You (Marty Robbins) 

7 . Let’s Go All The Way (Norma Jean) 

8. Sorely (Warner Mack) 

9. Three Sheets In The Wind (Johnny Bond) 

10. Five Little Fingers (Bill Anderson) 

DOUG SMITH 
WKMF 

Flint, Michigan 

1. Saginaw, Michigan (Lefty Frizzell) 

2. Welcome To My World (Jim Reeves) 

3. This White Circle On My Finger (Kitty Wells) 

4. Begging To You (Marty Robbins) 

5. Who Is The Biggest Fool (Les Cunningham) 

6. Easy Come^Easy Go (Bill Anderson) 

7 . Old Records (Margie Singleton) 

8. B. J. The D. J. (Stonewall Jackson) 

9. Your Heart Turned Left (George Jones) 

10. Wooden Soldier (Hank Locklin) 

DAVID INGLES 
KFMJ 

Tulsa, Oklahoma 

1. B. J. The D. J. (Stonewall Jackson) 

2. One Is A Lonely Number (George Jones) 

3. I Really Don’t Want To Know (Jimmy Dean) 

4. Big City (Wynn Stewart) 

5. Put Your Arms Around Him (Bob Morris) 

6. Too Hot To Handle (Frankie Miller) 

7. Old Records (Margie Singleton) 

8. She Called Me Baby (Sheb Wooley) 

9. Easy Come— Easy Go (Bill Anderson) 

10. Widow Maker (Jimmy Martin) 

HAPPY DAY 
KNEZ 

Lompoc, California 

1. Love’s Gonna Live Here (Buck Owens) 

2. If The Back Door Could Talk (Webb Pierce) 

3. Saginaw, Michigan (Lefty Frizzell) 

4. Trouble In My Arms (Johnny & Jonie Mosby) 

5. This White Circle On My Finger (Kitty Wells) 

6. Your Heart Turned Left (George Jones) 

7. Ninety Miles An Hour (Hank Snow) 

8. Surely (Warner Mack) 

9. Begging To You (Marty Robbins) 

10. How Can I Forget You (Glenn Barber) 


SHERIFF TEX DAVIS 
WCMS 

Norfolk, Virginia 

1. Long Gone Lonesome Blues (Hank Williams Jr.) 

2. Welcome To My World (Jim Reeves) 

3. Millers Cave (Bobby Bare) 

4. You’ll Drive Me Back (Faron Young) 

5. Saginaw, Michigan (Lefty Frizzell) 

6. My Saro Jane (Flatt & Scruggs) 

7. Begging To You (Marty Robbins) 

8. Molly (Eddy Arnold) 

9. Widow Maker (Jimmie Martin) 

10. Understand Your Man (Johnny Cash) 

CHUCK BROWN 
WJWS 

South Hill, Virginia 

1 . Peel Me A Nonner (Roy Drusky) 

2. Sweet Little Country Girl (Carl Smith) 

3. Thot’s One Broken Heart (Wiley & Jessie) 

4. Long Gone Lonesome Blues (Hank Williams Jr.) 

5. You’ll Drive Me Back (Faron Young) 

6. Tadpole (Tillman Franks) 

7. Molly (Eddy Arnold) 

8. Understand Your Man (Johnny Cash) 

9. Love Come To Me (Webb Pierce) 

10. Don’t Leave Me Lonely Too Long (Kathy Dee) 

MAC CURTIS 
KPCN 

Fort Worth, Dallas 

1. Saginaw, Michigan (Lefty Frizzell) 

2. Begging To You (Marty Robbins) 

3. Molly (Eddy Arnold) 

4. The Big Wheel (Howard Crockett) 

5. Hongin’ Around (Wilburns) 

6. Millers Cave (Bobby Bare) 

7. Let’s Go All The Way (Norma Jean) 

8. Break Up Someone’s Home (Kitty Wells) 

9. Understand Your Man (Johnny Cash) 

10. Home Away From Home (Tony Douglas) 

KRZY 

1. Saginaw, Michigan (Lefty Frizzell) 

2. Before I'm Over You (Loretta Lynn) 

3. The Morning Paper (Billy Walker) 

4. Through The Eyes Of A Fool (Roy Clark) 

5. Old Records (Margie Singleton) 

6. Put Your Arms Around Him (Bob Morris) 

7. B. J. The D. J. (Stonewall Jackson) 

6. Last Day In The Mines (Dave Dudley) 

9. Your Heart Turned Left (George Jones) 

10. Speak To Me (Carl Belew) 



COUNTRY 

REVIEWS 

B+ very good C+ f***' , 

B good C mediocre 


THE CASH BOX 


BULLSEYE 


“KEEPING UP WITH THE “NO THANKS, I JUST HAD 

JONESES” (2:28) ONE” (2:23) 

[Tree BMI — Tubb] [Moss Rose BMI — Anderson] 

MARGIE SINGLETON & FARON YOUNG (Mercury 72237) 

Margie Singleton, who is currently riding high with “Old Records” and 
Faron Young, who is scoring with “You’ll Drive Me Back,” are a cinch 
to score with either side or both of this new Mercury teaming-up. One 
side, “Keeping Up With The Joneses,” is a rhythmic, medium-paced ode 
about the social competition of modern life. The other end, “No Thanks, I 
Just Had One,” is a slow-moving, shufflin’ romancer with a warm, moving 
soulful melody. Eye ’em both. 


“PETTICOAT JUNCTION” (2:28) [Carolintone BMI — Henning, Massey] 
“HAVE YOU SEEN MY DEAR COMPANION” (2:11) 

[Peer Int’l BMI — Cirtain, Stacey] 

LESTER FLATT & EARL SCRUGGS (Columbia 42982) 

Flatt and Scruggs, who are currently clicking with “My Saro Jane,” 
seem destined to have a blockbuster on their hands with this new release. 
The top side here, “Petticoat Junction,” the theme of popular TV’er, is 
an extremely fast-moving lively ditty with some clever gimmick sound 
effects and lyrics. The attractive coupler, “Have You Seen My Dear 
Companion,” is a slow-moving, tradition-oriented country lament essayed 
with poise and authority by the boys. 


“PASSING THROUGH” (2:29) [We Three BMI— Blakeslee] 
“CHICK ASHA Y” (2:09) [A1 Gallico BMI— Franks, Houston] 


A Hickory-Pye Get-Together 



LONDON — Pye Records execs hosted a reception for Wesley Rose, president 
of Hickory Records, and members of his firm recently at the Dorchester Hotel 
here. Pictured at the affair are (left to right) Rose, Jimmy Henney of Chap- 
pell Music, Lonnie Donegan, Terry Oates of Acuff-Rose, Teddy Homes of 
Chappell, Louis Benjamin, managing director of Pye Records Ltd., Kris Jen- 
sen, Roy Acuff, a v.p. at Hickory, Lester Rose, sales manager for Hickory, 
and Neville Marten, CB European Director. The British firm has become the 
English distributor for all Hickory product. 


On The Promo Trail 


Pamper Snares Carter 



MIAMI — Mercury’s Leroy Van Dyke 
recently guested on the Skinny 
Smitty show on WEDR-Miami while 
on a promo swing through the Sun- 
shine State. The artist’s new “Leroy 
Van Dyke Show” goes out weekly on 
Canada’s ITO Network on March 1 
and negotiations are in the works 
for network airing in the U. S. The 
chanter’s new single couples “Night 
People” with “Baby Where Can You 
Be.” 



NASHVILLE — Pamper Music re- 
cently signed vet country tunesmith 
to an exclusive writers contract. 
Standing (left to right) in the above 
pic are J. Hal Smith, general man- 
ager of the pubbery. Rose and coun- 
try Hank Cochran. 


DAVID HOUSTON (Epic 9658) 

David Houston, who jumped into the national limelight with his pre- 
vious initial release, “Mountain Of Love,” should quickly go a similar 
success route with this new ultra-commercial item tagged “Passing 
Through.” The tune is a contagious, uptempo catchy novelty with some 
historical-oriented lyrics. Deck has a good pop chance. “Chickashay” is 
a medium-paced, chorus-backed yodelin’ lament read with assurance by 
the songster. 


“THE WHEEL SONG” (2:09) [Central Songs BMI— Long, Slatton] 
“SUIT OF SORROW” (2:23) [Dunrovyn BMI— K., J. & L. McKay] 
GARY BUCK (Petal 1500) 

Gary Buck can strike paydirt once again with this new Petal release 
called “The Wheel Song.” The side is a lively, chorus-backed romancer 
with a first-rate rhythmic beat and some mighty impressive lyrics. The 
flip, “Suit Of Sorrow,” is a shuffle-beat tear-jerker in the traditional 
hillbilly vein. Also merits a close look. 


“LONESOME” (2:23) [Window BMI— Bruce] 

“EIGHT YEARS” (2:23) [Tree BMI— Wayne] 

CLAUDE GRAY (Mercury 72236) 

Claude Gray has been cold for a spell but he quickly got back in his 
money-making ways with this powerful new hitsville contender. The top 
side, “Lonesome,” is a plantive, chorus-backed tear-jerker in which the 
chanter compares his lonesomeness to several different aspects of life. 
On “Eight Years” Gray dishes-up a moving ballad about a marriage that 
is going on the rocks. 


MAC WISEMAN (Capitol 5116) 

(B_|_) <“TIS SWEET TO BE RE- 
MEMBERED” (2:18) [Dot 
BMI — Wiseman] The vet country 
artist could quickly click with this 
lively uptempo chorus-backed happy 
affair with a real infectious, spinnable 
melody. Deejays should come out in 
droves for the side. 

(B) “THE SCENE OF THE 
CRIME” (2:36) [Pamper BMI 
— Forshee] This time out Wiseman 
offers a tender tradition-styled blue- 
grass-flavored weeper. 


DORIS KING (Hickory 1242) 

(B-h) “BLUE LIVING ROOM” 
(2:30) [Fred Rose BMI— 
Rainwater] Newcomer Doris King 
could make a name for herself with 
this catchy, chorus-backed shufflin’ 
tale of heartbreak read with the 
authority of a long-successful pro. 
Watch it. 

(B-h) “I PICKED A DAISY” (2:30) 
[Robyn BMI — Zeigler, Hicks] 
More fine country sounds. This one’s 
a slow-moving melodic tear-jerker in 
which the lark showcases her wide- 
range voice most effectively. 


50 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



Gash Box 


COUNTRY 



Pos. Last 
Week 


1 

BEGGING TO YOU 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 42831) 

1 

26 

2 

D.J. FOR A DAY 

Jimmy Newman (Decca 31553) 

2 

27 

3 

PEEL ME A NANNER 

Roy Drusky (Mercury 72204) 

4 

28 

4 

LAST DAY IN THE MINES 
Dave Dudley (Mercury 72212) 

3 

29 

5 

OLD RECORDS 

Margie Singleton (Mercury 72213) 

5 

3i 

6 

SAGINAW, MICHIGAN 

Lefty Frizzell (Columbia 42924) 

9 

31 

7 

B.J. THE D.J. 

Stonewall Jackson (Columbia 42889, 

6 

32 

8 

FIVE LITTLE FINGERS 

Bill Anderson (Decca 315771 

10 

33 

9 

HOWDY, NEIGHBOR 

HOWDY 

Porter Wagoner (RCA Victor 8257) 

7 

34 

10 

BIG CITY GIRLS 

Carl Belem (RCA Victor S2701 

14 

35 

11 

TRIANGLE 

Cart SmHh (Columbia 42858) 

8 

36 

12 

BEFORE I'M OVER YOU 

Loretta Lynn (Decca 31541) 

11 

37 

13 

THAT'S WHY 1 SING IN A 
HONKY TONK 

Warren Smith (Liberty 55615) 

’2 

38 

14 

THROUGH THE EYES 

OF A FOOL 

Roy Clark (Capitol 5099) 

17 

39 

IS 

MOLLY 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 8296) 

26 

40 

16 

YOU'LL DRIVE ME BACK 
(INTO HER ARMS) 

Faron Young (Morcury 72212) 

18 

41 

17 

NINETY MILES AN HOUR 
Hank Snom (RCA Victor 8239) 

13 

42 

18 

GOING THROUGH THE 
MOTIONS 

Sonny James (Capitol 5087) 

15 

43 

19 

TEAR AFTER TEAR 

Rex Allen (Mercury 72205) 

21 

44 

20 

JEALOUS HEARTED ME 

Eddy Arnold (RCA Victor 8253) 

16 

45 

21 

LOVE'S GONNA LIVE HERE 
Buck Owens (Capitol 5025) 

19 

46 

22 

WIDOW MAKER 

Jimmy Martin (Decca 31388) 

23 

47 

23 

WELCOME TO MY WORLD 

Jim Reeves (RCA Victor 8289) 

30 

48 

24 

THERE'RE MORE PRETTY 
GIRLS THAN ONE 

George Hamilton (RCA Victor 1250 

20 

<s 

25 

ALL RIGHT 

George Morgan (Columbia 42882) 

32 

50 


Pot. Last 
Week 

YOUR HEART TURNED 
LEFT 41 

George Jones (United Artists 6S3) 


I DON'T LOVE NOBODY 22 

Leon McAuliffe (Capitol 5066) 

MILLER'S CAVE 36 

Bobby Bare (RCA Victor 8294) 

TOO LATE TO TRY AGAIN 24 

Carl & Pearl Butler (Columbia 42892) 


GOOD MORNING SELF 39 

Jim Reeves (RCA Victor 8289) 


HELPLESS 25 

Joe Carson (Liberty 55614) 


YOU TOOK MY HAPPY 
AWAY 38 

Willie Nelson (Liberty 55638) 


MAPLE ON THE HILL 28 

Joe & Rose Lee Mophls (Capitol 5077) 


THE WHITE CIRCLE 
ON MY FINGER 

Kitty Wells (Decca 31580) 


LONG GONE LONESOME 
BLUES 48 

Hank Williams Jr. (MGM 13208) 


UNDERSTAND YOUR MAN 

Johnny Cash (Columbia 42964) 


HE SAYS THE SAME 
THINGS TO ME 43 

Skeeter Davis (RCA Victor 8288) 


THE MORNING PAPER 27 

Billy Walker (Columbia 42891) 


Webb Pierce (Decca 31582) 


WHO'S BEEN CHEATIN' 

WHO 29 

Johnny A Jonie Metby 
(Columbia 42841) 


THE GIRL FROM SPANISH 
TOWN 

Marty Robbins (Columbia 42968) 


PEN & PAPER 45 

Jerry Lee Lewis (Smash 1857) 


PILLOW THAT WHISPERS 46 

Carl Smith (Columbia 42949) 


TADPOLE 

Tillman Franks (Starday 651) 


33 


A WEEK IN THE COUNTRY 47 

Crnest Ashworth (Hickory J237i 


WORST OF LUCK 

Bobby Barnett (Sims 159) 


TROUBLE IN MY ARMS 35 
Johnny A Jonie Mosby 
(Columbia 42841) 


THE MATADOR 31 

Johnny Cash (Columbia 42880) 

DREAM HOUSE FOR SALE 34 

Red Sovine (Starday 650) 


(RCA Victor 8261) 



COUNTRY 
ROUND UP 


Jim Gaines, promotion director of 
WPEG-Winston-Salem, recently sent 
in an open letter which is of major 
importance to the entire country 
music trade. Writes Jim: “I have a 
feeling that everything connected with 
country music is swiftly and surely 
being up-graded with one exception. 
And that exception is the quality of 
the radio product being offered to the 


are currently enjoying much favor- 
able reaction to their first Allstar 
release, “I’ll Always Love You.” Walt 
Breeland advises that a request via 
station letterhead to him at 8798 
Ruthby, Houston, Texas will bring 
prompt delivery of the above release. 
The Barkdull duo are seen twice 
weekly on Gulf Coast Jamboree, Hous- 
ton’s oldest television show. 



GEORGE HAMILTON IV 


ROY DRUSKY 


MERLE KILGORE 


country music fans. For too long now, 
the majority of country music stations 
have been content to sit back and be 
the doormat of its particular market. 
Far too long, many country music 
stations have been content to offer an 
inferior product to their audience . . . 
content to have the very small share 
of the market’s ratings, business and 
prestige. We, at WPEG, are fairly 
new to the country music field. Every- 
one on the staff is an ex-Top 40 or 
good music man. We are attempting 
to combine tbe Top 40 showmanship 
and promotional activities with tbe 
mature, personality approach of the 
good music stations. But there are 
many problems in trying to get a 
country music station accepted in the 
market. Therefore, the purpose of this 
open letter is to find others, like our- 
selves, who are attempting to up- 
grade the image of country music 
station in their markets. To find 
others that are aggressive in their 
on/off-the-air promotions. To find 
others that are aware of the fact that 
the average country music fan of 
today is a well educated individual 
that expects and demands a product 
that is equal or better than other 
stations in the same market. To find 
others that are not content to be 
number three or four or five in a 
market — but number one.” Jim notes 
that any interested stations should 
write to him in care of WPEG. 

Besides promoting the latest 
records by Faron Young, Warner 
Mack, Carlton Rose, Roy Drusky, 
George Hamilton IV, Margie Single- 
ton and Tom Tall, Richie Johnson 
now has copies of “Johnny Zero” by 
Merle Kilgore and “That’s What 
Makes The World Go Around” by 
Claude King. Deejays needing copies 
should write to Richie at Box 3, Belen, 
New Mexico. 

Almost immediately after Johnny 
Cash’s appearance on “Hootenanny” 
he was resigned for a forthcoming 
show at Dartmouth. This makes four 
network appearances for Johnny in 
five weeks. Also upcoming is an ap- 
pearance on Johnny Carson’s “Tonight 
Show” the first week in March. 

Tompall and the Glaser Bros, are 
on the road again working a string of 
key one-niters and personal appear- 
ances. The gang recently wound up 
shots in Port Huron, Columbia, and 
Charlotte. 

Sterling Blythe, western director of 
KSEE-Santamaria, California, a popu- 
lar Top 40 outlet, sends along word 
that the station is now adding an 
early morning country and western 
show to their format. Sterling sez 
that they are in dire need of country 
product and would like c&w singles 
and LP’s, both old and new. 

Wiley Barkdull, formerly with the 
Hickory label, and his wife, Jessie, 


Don Pierce of Starday Records has 
announced further expansion of the 
label’s music publishing activities 
from the addition of Lee Emerson 
who will work with Vic Willis, Tommy 
Hill and Eddie Wilson on the exploita- 
tion of the Starday catalog. Lee is 
well known on the Music City scene 
having been associated with Marty 
Robbins for many years. He will work 
with songwriters and will maintain 
liaison with artists, producers and 
A&R men who cut at Nashville’s 
studios. Lee invites writers to contact 
him at the Starday offices in Madison. 

Jimmy Key of Rice Records sends 
along news that A1 Egan, United 
Record Distributors, Hartford, Con- 
necticut, has taken over distribution 
of Rice Records in the New England 
area and will cover eastern New York 
state, all of Connecticut, Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, 
Vermont and Maine. David Price’s 
record of “The World Lost A Man” is 
already getting very favorable reac- 
tion in the New England area accord- 
ing to A1 at United. 

Georgie Riddle being kept busy 
with dates in Dallas, Tex. at the Hi-Ho 
Club after which he heads out for a 
15 day tour of Minn., South Dakota, 
Wisconsin and Indiana. Riddle will 
soon be sporting a brand new release 
on United Artists Records and he is 
set for a guest shot on the Faron 
Young Radio to be transcribed and 
heard in several major markets. 

David Houston is a direct decendant 
of Sam Houston, and on his Mother’s 
side; her maiden name was Beatrice 
Lee, he is a decendant of Robert E. 
Lee. In David’s brand new Epic re- 
lease, in the last verse he says, “I 
heard the Raven cry . . .” Here he 
refers to his kinsman. General Sam 
Houston, who is referred to through- 
out history as “The Raven.” 

Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were 
recently in Hollywood for another 
guest appearance on the “Beverly 
Hillbillies.” They are also set for 
another shot on ABC-TV’s “Hoote- 
nanny” show on March 14. 


DANKESCHON UGH DJ's 

For Spinning 

V2 — FRAULEIN 
+ y2— CHEROKEE 

"-SQUAWLEIN 

by 

LAWTON WILLIAMS 
RCA VICTOR 

For Copies Wrife 
1758 Oak Hill Rd. 

Fort Worth 12, Texas 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


51 





It’s now certain that the famous guitar ensemble of The Tornadoes who at 
one time were on all charts with “Telstar” is due to visit Belgium for a tour 
of five days. Tentative dates of March 5 to 9 have been put forward. This ar- 
rangement has been arrived at between the Robert Stigwood Association and 
Publi Show at Aalst in Flanders. The Decca-stars will make two daily appear- 
ances at different places and a TV-show is also scheduled. 

Cliff Richard and The Shadows are also coming to Belgium and the dates of 
May 8, 9 and 10 have been set. They will be in Liege, Brussels, Ghent and Ant- 
werp. There is also the possibility of The Beatles coming to this country in 
May, although Brian Epstein, their manager told us that nothing has been de- 
cided yet but that some dates are still open at the beginning of June. 

Talking about The Beatles we would like to quote Mr. Garin, commercial 
manager of SA Gramophone: every record, single as well as LP reaches im- 
pressive daily salesfigures. And The Beatles have only really started. Mr. Garin 
also talked about the successful appearance of Richard Anthony at the An- 
cienne Belgique in Brussels. Anthony also met Adamo whom he probably will 
have congratulated on his own productions, while he himself sticks to transcrip- j 
tions of original American hits. Lately, he has been busy again translating I 
“You’ll Never Walk Alone” into “Rien Que Toi.” In London, he recently re- j 
corded an LP featuring twelve tunes sung in French. “All My Love” has be- 
come “Toi L’Amie” which will allow Walloons and Frenchmen to catch some- 
thing of the lyrics. 

Willy Roelants, salesmanager of Inelco is at San Remo Festival where 
Peggy March, Paul Anka etc. of the RCA-label are performing. The latter has 
come out with a new Elvis Presley single, featuring “Mexico” and “You Can’t 
Say No To Acapulco,” lifted out of the LP “Fun In Acapulco.” Also new with 
RCA is a little Distel-disk with the French version of “Sur Un Air De Banjo.” 
And we are expecting Trini Lopez in Belgium. 

Belgium's Best Sellers 

FLEMISH 

1 Alleen (John Larry/Polydor/Passe Partout) 

2 Tombe La Neige ( Adamo/Pathe/Ardmore and Beechwood) 

3 She Loves You (The Beatles/Parlophone/Belinda) i 

4 Tchin, Tchin (Richard Anthony/Columbia/Southern) | 

Maria Elena (Los Indios Tabajaras/RCA/World) I 

,5 If I Had A Hammer (Trini Lopez/Reprise/Essex) | 

La Mamma (Charles Aznavour/Barclay/Peter Plum) 

6 I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles/Parlophone/Vedette) i 

7 This Land Is Your Land (Trini Lopez/Reprise) I 

8 Ik Lees In Je Ogen (Lou Neefs/Moonglow/Intervox) j 

9 Sixteen Tons (Lou Neefs/Moonglow) 

Le Train Des Neiges (Petula Clark /Vogue/Vogue International) j 

10 Droom Van Mij/Alleen Door Jou (Bob Benny/Polydor/Ideal) i 

WALLOON I 

1 Tombe La Neige (Adamo/Pathe/Ardmore and Beechwood) i 

2 Tchin, Tchin (Richard Anthony/Columbia/Southern) 

3 La Mamma (Charles Aznavour/Barclay/Peter Plum) 

4 Ma Biche (Frank Alamo/Barclay) 

5 Le Train Des Neiges (Petula Clark/Vogue/Vogue International) 

6 Ma Guitare (Johnny Halliday/Philips/World) 

7 Si J’Avais Un Marteau (Claude Frangois/Philips/Essex) 

8 Maria Elena (Los Indios Tabajaras/RCA/World) 

9 N’Est Ce Pas Merveilleux? /Crier Ton Nom (Adamo/Pathe/Ardmore and 
Beechwood/Rudo) 

1 10 C’Est Bein Joli D’Etre Copain (Le Petit Prince/Barclay) 


Cash Box And The Beatles In Paris 



FRANCE 



This weekly column starts off with news about a publishing firm. The 
question is SEMI which is an affiliate of Southern Music in France and ti^m 
whom we have just received some news in the form of a letter signed by JJo- 
wille who is in charge of the press relations. In this way we were informea 
that Georges Jouvin has just recorded “Les Larmes D’Une Trompette, ^which 
is the French adaptation of the Italian song “Lacrima De Una Tromba. fhis 
grooving is a duo between Jouvin and his trumpet and Dominique. Tino Kossi 
has just cut a series of groovings from the Semi catalog, one of these Mana 
Elena,” a standard pop song which has just been re-plugged in U.S.A. by 
Los Indios Tabajaras. He has also recorded “Reviens Mon Enfant,’ French tag 
of a German success, “Junge Komm” and another French adaptation called 
“Crepuscule Tango” from the German tune “Abendglocken Tango.” Apart from 
the 'Tino Rossi record the tune has also been cut by Tani Scala, Armandino, 
Jose Granados Jean Raphael, Tony Meller etc. It seems that this tango is going 
to have the same classical success as “Blauer Himmel.” As we have already 
announced Henri Salvador has just canned “Annie,” which is no other than 
“Little Eefie Annie.” With Barclay, Frankie Alamo has just recorded P9|*r 
Les Filles,” which was adapted by Frank Gerald from the original “Just Like 
Eddie.” Let’s now talk about Brigitte Bardot who is on the Philips label has 
just canned “Ne Me Laisse Pas L’Aimer” and “Maria Ninguern.” The two songs 
were written by two youngsters Jean Michel Rivat and Francis Fumieres. Jean 
Claude Brialy has recorded “Le Tour Du Monde” a song from the pen plume of 
Pierre Barough. To terminate with Semi let’s say that the Los Machu^mbos 
have cut “Maria Elena,” as well as “La Itra Bamba” and “La Bamba De Colas. 
Lastly, let’s point out the success obtained in Belgium by a Richard Anthony 
tune entitled “Tchin Tchin.” Must say that in France as well this record is sell- 
ing well. 

Still on novelty releases let’s say that Editions Tutti is the lucky and^ happy 
publisher of the music from the television show “Thierry La Fronde.” John 
William has recorded the main theme on the Polydor label coupled with “Bay- 
ard.” On the Philips ticket a record of A1 Casey Combo, “Easy Pickin’ ’ and 
“Surfin’ Hootenanny.” Festival has just released another disk by les Surfs 
called “Oublie Cet Etranger.” This release seems to bring delight to Achir 
Chemouny. Odeon has evidently released on the French market the disks of 
the Beatles. It seems that the success is situated around the song “I Want To 
Hold Your Hand.” The group entitled Les Missiles who record on the Ducretet 
Thomson label, has just supplied us with their second disking. Principle title 
seems to be “Je Sais Que Tu Triches.” Just been announced for next week the 
release of two singles by Sheila, but impossible for us at this time of writing 
to inform you of the titles. It appears for the time being to be a Top secret, 
this keeps us wondering and asking why? From EMI must mention a novelty 
disk by Ria Bartok, “Seul Parmi Les Autres” and “C’Est L’ Amour.” Danielle 
Darrieux who decidedly does not wish to quit the scene supplies us with “Pe- 
tite De La Rue” and “Prends Le Temps De M’Aimer D’Avantage.” Robert 
Cartier gives us an E.P. of which two of these are in French and the other two 
in English. To end up this small chapter let’s point out a recording by Touistitis 
with “Virginia” and “Mon Idee.” A couple of words for the Bel Air ticket, a 
young singer called Jean Luc has just given us an excellent grooving with prin- 
ciple title “L’Homme Du Sud.” However, it does not seem to be of the kind to 
make a big success, but we can say without a doubt that the day he finds a 
song suitable he will have a big chance to be among the stars, and could stay 
there for quite some time. A few lines on Lucky Blondeau who has recorded 
four titles these are slows, this proves that he has abandoned the rock and 
twist. 'The titles canned are “Ne Pleure Pas” and “Aves Des Si. Sacha Distel 
with “Un Air De Banjo” and “II Tient Le Monde.” Georges Boujnah does not 
seem to appreciate these two songs, but he confirms, on the other hand, what 
we have already written in a previous column that the “Tord Boyau” is step- 
ping out to be a very big hit and that this song gives him the impression that 
it will last. Last minute news and novelties just come in. Eddie Barclay has 
waxed and released of course on the Barclay ticket the principle theme from 
the film starring Fran^oise Hardy, “Chateau en Suede.” A tune from the origi- 
nal film sound track “Cuisine Au Burre” has just been released on the French 
market by the Bel Air record firm in the form of an E.P. The orchestra under 
the direction of Jean Marion, the composer of the musical score of the film. 


PARIS — Cash Box was there in suite ; 
Number 120 at a hotel with a famous i 
name on the Avenue Georges V in ! 
Paris, together with four British “bee- 
tle-heads” who have become famous, 
watching a TV-show called “Age Ten- 
' dre Et Tete De Bois” (Tender Age , 
And Wooden Head). 'Their friend ; 
Trini Lopez was due to appear and j 
they also had found out that four fake 
Beatles were to be on the show and 
they didn’t want to miss it. 1 

Our Paris photographer whom we 
were to meet in front of the hotel at | 
seven in the evening had already 
warned us at lunchtime: “You will 
/ never get inside.” We only began to 
/ take his words seriously when we 
; spotted throngs of policemen on the 
boulevard near the hotel. Sofar, we 
had been turned back several times by 
the hotel’s civil but firm receptionist. 
Everytime we put the question about 
the possibility of getting in touch 
with The Beatles we got the same po- 

> lite brush-off : “Sorry sir, but we don’t 
V know who you mean . . .” 

Everything changed however after 
i we had met The Beatles backstage at 
' the Olympia Theater, where they are 
heading the bill till February 4. Neal 

> Aspennal granted us a five minute 
talk with The Beatles at suite 120, 

" but as soon as the door had been 
opened we were welcomed by four 
eager and hosnitable hands. 

. “You’ve come at the right time,” 
says John Lennon, who is considered 
head of the group, but who isn’t, as 
The Beatles simply don’t go for lead- 
ership. 

John then goes on to say that Lo- 
pez is to appear in five minutes and 


that there is to be an imitation of 
their act. “We like to watch that sort 
of thing, although it has become rou- 
tine over in Great Britain,” he adds. 
He was talking about the “Age Ten- 
dre” program. They made friends 
with Lopez the first night of their ap- 
pearance at the Olympia Theater. 

“He’s a real nice guy, a real Tex- 
an,” remarks George Harrison while 
picking at a bone of an enormous fish. 
(The foursome were finishing their 
dinner.) The Beatles think his act is 
excellent. 

Ringo Starr takes up a seat next 
to us and starts divulging their plans 
for the near future: they are staying 
in Paris till Feb. 4 and return to Lon- 
don the same day from where they 
will take off to the States. They will 
appear on three Ed Sullivan Shows 
and will also be at Carnegie Hall. 

“Do you know ‘I Want To Hold 
Your Hand’ is Number One in the 
United States?” he adds proudly. 

Ringo displays a copy of Cash Box 
and shows us, proud as a peacock, 
their first place on the Top 100. Quite 
a performance for the lively group 
from Liverpool. “And then we will go 
on a holiday,” he continues. “Probably 
to some exotic place where the sun 
shines all day and where we can get 
a beautiful tan and be far away from 
British cold and fog.” 

At lunchtime the same day we had 
a meeting with Trini Lopez at his ho- 
tel in the Rue Scribe, near the Olym- 
pia Theater. It was an “au revoir” in 
fact as we had met him backstage at 
the Scheveningen Kurhaus on the oc- 
casion of the “Grand Gala Du Disque.” 


France's Best Sellers 

1 La Mama (Charles Aznavour) Charles Aznavour — French Music 

2 La Marie Joconde (Alain Barriere) Alain Barriere — Tutti 

3 If I Had A Hammer (Lee Hayer, Seeger) Trini Lopez — Tropicales 

3 Si J’Avais Un Marteau (Lee Hayer, Seeger, Claude Francois) Claude 
Frangois — Tropicales 

4 J’Aurais Voulu (Frangoise Hardy) Frangoise Hardy — Pathe Marconi 

5 Le Tord Boyau (Pierre Perret) Pierre Perret — Vogue International 



A Belgian Meets The Beatles 


PARIS — Frans Romeyns (2nd from right) CB correspondent in Belgium, is pic- 
tured with the Beatles in their hotel room in Paris where they are a top draw 
at the Olympia Theater. The Liverpool quartet appears pleased with their CB 
chart status which has them riding with five tunes. 


52 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964' 


International Section 


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THE BARCLAY STORY: 

15 Years Of Great Success 


On January 26, Eddie Barclay cele- 
brated his 43rd birthday and the 15th 
anniversary of the record company 
which bears his name. 

Pianist, composer, orchestra leader, 
a maker of stars for whom he is 
manager and friend; President and 
General Director of the Compagnie 
Phonographique Francaise with a 
turnover in 1962 of $6,000,000, a tal- 
ent for music and for business, Bar- 
clay has gone from the delivery 
truck he used to drive himself to a 
chauffeur driven Cadillac without 
transition, merely a first step towards 
the first million. When he used to de- 
liver his own records, he’d say, “One 
day, ril have a Cadillac with a chauf- 
feur, or . . . nothing!” 

And he has realized all he’s prom- 
ised himself. More importantly, he has 
realized all he has promised others. In 
20 years of music and 15 years of ad- 
ministrative and commercial activity, 
he has created an empire of “pop” 
music, which empire is now all-power- 
ful. 

Born in Paris on January 26, 1921; 
as an adolescent, Edouard Ruault 
would leave the counter in the family 
cafe situated near the Gare de Lyon in 
order to get practice on the cafe piano. 
And, as soon as he’d been able to save 
a little money, he joined the “Hot 
Club de France.” At 17, he won a 
piano contest for young pianists given 
by the “Hot Club,” without having 
ever learned either solfege or har- 
mony. 

In 1945, he made his debut at, “The 
Club,” owned by Pierre Louis Guerin 
and located at 45 rue Pierre Charron. 
There, he met his wife, Nicole. So 
they might remain together, he re- 
named her “Eve Williams” and had 
her sing with his orchestra. 

The clientele, made up mostly of 
bored American GI’s, accustomed to 
Jazz orchestras and American names, 
so badly pronounced Edouard’s first 
name that he immediately became Ed- 
die, while Ruault was so demolished 
in the mill of the Yankee accent, that 
Eddie decided to change his name al- 
together. He therefore rebaptized 
himself: Barclay; sounding loud and 
strong his own personal Broadway. 
During the same period, Eddie began 
to record, but with great difficulty. 
Materials for making the record bis- 
cuit were practically impossible to 
find, while record companies of the 
time were far more interested in clas- 
sical music than in Jazz. (Classics 
represented 60% of sales.) 

But the couple Barclay continued 
to dream of the sensation they would 
create if they could manage to dis- 
tribute American hits in France, and 
they finally managed to get Pathe- 
Marconi to press a few titles for 
them. 

It was on a bicycle that Eddie then 
went around to visit each and every 
record shop owner. Most record re- 
tailers were opposed to jazz and Ed- 
die set about convincing them one by 
one: a regular election campaign! 
And it was thus that after months of 
effort, the Barclays one day found 
themselves in possession of a small 
amount of money ($200), just enough 
to permit them to get to the United 
States and prospect the American 
popular record market on the spot. 
It was Nicole who left . . . and who 
returned with a treasure of original 
masters. 

Finally, on his 26th birthday in 
January of 1947, Eddie founded the 
Societe Phonographique Francaise 
and released “Play, Piano, Play,” by 
Errol Garner. One of the first Amer- 
ican hits to cross the Ocean after the 
war, the record won the “Grand Prix 
de Musique de Jazz.” 

Despite the prize, however, and de- 
spite the 50,000 78rpm records sold 
in one year, working capital was still 
lacking. By the end of 1948, Barclay 
was _ all the same able to buy the 
magic record, the LP high fidelity, the 
marvelous unbreakable microgroove. 

He next took his “Hot Club” bud- 
dies Django Reinhardt, Stephane 
Grappelly, and Emil Stern under 
contract, and had his vinylites pressed 


and shipped directly from New York. 
The Barclay firm was indeed under- 
way. 

In 1950, Renee Lebas was brought 
in by Emil Stern to record, “Tire, Tire 
L’Aiguille,” “La St Bonheur,” and 
“Ou Es-Tu Mon Amour?,” whose suc- 
cess opened the “pop” door to Bar- 
clay. This small triumph was rein- 
forced by Eddie Constantine: 30,000 
records sold in a month. Against and 
despite everyone, Barclay believed in 
Constantine and in Constantine’s 
raspy voice. And when the movies 
made a star of Constantine, the sale 
of his records shot up like gey- 
sers. Constantine’s second release, 
“L’Homme Et L’Enfant” sold 500,000 
copies. From $60,000 in 1954 to $450,- 

000 in 1955 . . . Barclay had consid- 
erably increased his turnover. Then 
came “The Platters.” “Only You” hit 
a fabulous sales figure: 1 million. 
First time this figure was ever 
reached on the French market. 

At an amateur contest, Eddie Bar- 
clay saw and signed Dalida, who was 
to become a big star, to an exclusive 
contract. This was in 1956. 

He opened a recording studio — the 
most modern in Europe — on the Ave- 
nue Hoche; while 143, avenue de 
Neuilly saw the Barclay firm move in. 

To stimulate sales, he created his 
own competition by forming the 
Societe des Disques Bel-Air. Mar- 
pessa Dawn recorded, “Orfeu Negro” 
for Bel-Air and Dalida recorded the 
same title for Barclay. 

In 1959, he annexed the enoi-mous 
talents of Charles Aznavour, and in 
1960 revived those of Leo Ferre. 1961 
was the turn of Leny Escudero and 
1962 that of Jacques Brel. Talent 
scout and perpetual contest organizer, 
he took the “Golf Drouot” in hand; 
then launched “Eddy Mitchell and les 
Chaussettes Noires” over the Europe 
No. 1 radio network. 

At Cannes, where his parties are 
the most fabulous and the most 
searched after, Eddie Barclay, all in 
seeming to take it very lightly man- 
aged with a laugh to extract the 
rights to “Les Enfants Du Piree” 
from Jules Dassin. Result: 800,000 
copies sold in one year. Today, he 
promotes the “Petit Prince” who 
sings; he directs and records Frank 
Alamo; he propels Jean Ferrat and 
Evy, and has already engraved the 
hits of tomorrow on miles of ribbons 
of wax. 

A FEW QUESTIONS ASKED OF 
EDDIE BARCLAY 

Do you find Eddie the businessman 
has somewhat swallowed Eddie the 
musician ? 

Always, and too much so. But from 
time to time, I grant myself a first 
class recreation period. For example, 

1 and my large orchestra accompan- 
ied Frank Sinatra when he came to 
France to sing. 

What do you think of money? 

A proverb says: “A man without 
money is a wolf without teeth.” It’s 
also, I find, a marvelous tool with 
which to accomplish one’s dreams, 
realize one’s ideas, and offer pleasure 
to one’s friends. 

Do you make a practice of friend- 
ship ? 

Beyond any doubt. My friends are 
another form of myself. There’s no, 
“wait until tomorrow” for them when 
they ask for something. 

Do you have a collection? Do you 
like “things?” 

I like people above all. And I collect 
records. 

Eddie has 10,000 records that is 
among the most extraordinary record 
libraries in Europe, and a remarkable 
record for which he had the idea in 
the United States. It’s noisy every- 
where there. Eddie sold two minutes 
and thirty seconds of silence to the 
juke-boxes. 

Would you do it all over again if 
you had to? 

But I’m always starting over! Be- 
cause each time it all has to be re- 
done, followed through, in a word: 
reinvented! 



AZNAVOUR 

fc P PPr m Pf I 



COMPAGNIE PHONOGRAPHIQUE FRANCAISE 

143 av. de Neuilly, NEUILLY-S/SEINE - Tel. SAB 60-30 


FRANCE 


- -I 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


International Section 


The San Remo Contest: First Local, 

Then National & Now International; 

1964 Winner: “Non Ho LFta Per Amarti 


9? 


SAN REMO— The 14th Festival Della 
Canzone Italiana ended last week at 
San Remo, fashionable seaside resort 
of the Italian riviera dei fiori, with 
the song. "Non Ho L’eta Per Amarti 
(I’m Not Old Enough to Love You),” 
taking top honors. 

Originally an entirely local and na- 
tional affair, the San Remo Song Con- 
test has. over the years, developed 
into an event of international im- 
portance. 

Situated on the shores of the Med- 
itteranean and enjoying a warm, sun- 
ny climate. San Remo offers the 
winter weary publisher from the 
north a welcome break and the oppor- 
tunity to combine business with pleas- 
ure. Although the weather charts are 
an added incentive to travel south it 
is the possibility of picking up a po- 
tential hit for the best selling charts 
that really brings the music world to 
San Remo. The Contest’s claim to 
fame in this direction is founded on 
fact and goes back to 1958 when the 
winning song “Nel Blu Depinto Di 
Blu” by Domenico Modugno became a 
world hit as “Volare” and climbed as 
high as No. 1 in the Cash Box Top 
100. In 1959 the winning song “Piove” 
again by Modugno became equally 
famous when retitled “Ciao Ciao 
Bambino.” A year later in 1960 “Ro- 
mantica” entered the international 
charts and the 1961 festival produced 
another world hit “A1 Di La” followed 
in 1962 by “Quando Quando.” 

This year, the Contest attained 
complete international status with 
the participation for the first time of 
artists not only from other European 
countries but from America. A signifi- 
cant move and one which indicates 
America’s growing awareness of the 


necessity for its artists to enter into 
direct and personal competition with 
their European rivals if they are to 
regain some of the chart supremacy 
lost in recent years. With the eyes of 
Europe focused on the flower decked 
stage of the San Remo contest, a vast 
television hook-up gave the visiting 
artists an entre into the homes of po- 
tential fans in more than sixteen 
countries. All hotels were fully 
booked months ago when it was first 
known that Paul Anka and Peggy 
March (RCA); Frankie Laine (CBS); 
Frankie Avalon (Chancellor); Gene 
Pitney (United Artists); Ben E. King 
(Atlantic); The Fraternity Brothers 
(Verve); Bobby Rydell (Cameo-Park- 
way) and April Stevens and Nino 
Tempo (Atco) were coming over to do 
battle with a host of the top conti- 
nental favorties. It is also significant 
that all the visiting Americans sung 
in Italian (Frankie Laine, having 
sung in English in the preliminary 
rounds realized his mistake and 
learned an Italian version in time for 
the finals). San Remo underlines the 
necessity of recording in the local 
language and points the way for the 
future. American success in this field 
may in turn encourage more conti- 
nental artists to record especially for 
the American and British markets. 

Twenty four songs were submitted, 
each sung by two teams of artists — 
one Italian and one from another 
country. Twelve songs were rendered 
on the first and second nights from 
which twenty national juries, each of 
fifty members with one vote each, se- 
lected the twelve songs for presenta- 
tion in the finals, "rhese were an- 
nounced after the second night. 

The general standard was high 


with the emphasis on ballads. Several 
strong ballads made the finals, the 
best of these being: “Ogni Volta” 
(Every Time) sung by Roby Ferrante 
and Paul Anka — the latter gave a 
particularly fine rendering; “Quando 
Vedrai La Mia Ragazza” (When You 
See My Little Girl), admirably per- 
formed first by Little Tony and then by 
Gene Pitney; “La Prima Che Incon- 
tro” (The Frst Girl I Meet) by Fa- 
brizio Ferretti and The Fraternity 
Brothers; “Come Potrei Dimenticarti” 
(How Can I Forget You) by Tony 
Dallara and Ben E. King. Of the ro- 
mantic ballads the first to be heard 
in the finals was “leri Ho Incontrato 
Mia Madre” (Yesterday I Met My 
Mother) by Gino Paoli and Antonio 
Prieto followed by “Una Lacrima Sul 
Viso” (A Tear On The Face). Un- 
fortunately, the first singer Bobby 
Solo was suffering from loss of voice 
and mimed to his recording thus for- 
feiting his votes which was tough 
luck on the second singer Frankie 
Laine. One of the loveliest ballads of 
the evening was “Motive D’Amore” 
(Love Melody) with first rate per- 
formances by both artists — the Italian 
Pino Donaggio and American Frankie 
Avalon. Two rock ballads in the finals 
were “Strasera No, No, No” (Tonight 
No, No, No,) by Remo Germani and 


Nino Tempo and April Stevens and 
“Sabato Sera” (Saturday Night) by 
Bruno Filippini who fully justified his 
appearance at the festival as win- 
ner of the Castrocaro contest (a pre- 
liminary contest in which promising 
amateurs take part, the winning male 
and female singers making their pro- 
fessional debut at San Remo). 

The visiting team was represented 
by The Fraternity Brothers. The 
youngest singer at San Remo, Kob- 
ertino, together with Ameiica s 
youngest entrant Bobby Rydell, made 
the finals with the swinging and typi* 
cal Italian melody “Un Bacio Pic- 
colissimo” (A Very Little Kiss). As 
expected veteran of San Remo and one 
of the country’s favorite singers 
Domenico Modugno was frantically 
acclaimed for his forceful rendering 
of the tango type number “Che Me 
Ne Importa A Me” (What Interests 
Me). However, the future success of 
the song will owe just as much to the 
rendering by the second artiste 
Frankie Laine. 

We now come to the winning song 
“Non Ho L’Eta Per Amarti,” a soft, 
flowing, sentimental ballad composed 
by Nisa/Colonnello with lyrics by 
Panzeri and sung by Gigliola Cin- 
quetti (C.G.D.) and Patricia Carli 
(Bel-Air) and published by Sugar 
Music. Gigliola Cinquetti (17) was 
making her first professional appear- 
ance as the female winner of the Cas- 
trocaro contest and sang in Italian. 
Patricia Carli, Italian by birth and 
now living in France, sang in French. 
She is currently enjoying disk suc- 
cess in Belgium with “Demain Tu Te 
Maries.” Both girls were making their 
(Continued on next page) 


Cash Box Camera At San Remo Fest 




SAN REMO — Much of the color and 
excitement of the recently-concluded 
San Remo Song Festival was cap- 
tured by the roving Cash Box camera. 
Standing in the top left pic are Gigli- 
ola Cinquetti and Patricia Carli shown 
with their trophy after winning the 
contest with “Non Ho L’Eta.” Shown 
seated in the top right (photo) are 
distinguished San Remo visitors Dr. 
Karl Heinz Busse (Busse Musik), Mr. 
Rapetti (Ricordi), Albert Carisch 
(Southern), Giuseppe Piccolo (South- 
ern) and (iallazi (F. D. & H.). Stand- 
ing in the same shot are Bruno Pozza 
(Prpduzioni), Julio Guiu Clara (Ar- 
monico) and Gabriele Abbate (Con- 
nelly). Seated (left to right) in the 
middle left pic are Peter Beishunizen 
(Philips), Hugette Ferly (Editions 
Marbot), Rolf Marbot (Editions Mar- 
bot), Robert Iverson (executive veep 
of the Southern publishing group). 
Standing in that photo are Nico Boer 
(Phonogram) and Hans Dunk (South- 
ern). Pictured on the ground of the 


San Remo Casino (left to right) in 
the middle right shot are Jean Kluger 
(World Music), Augusta Alguero 
(F. D. & H.), Ben Nisbet (Feldmans), 
Mr. Serra (Vergara), Federico Hal- 
pern (Cash Box’ Spanish rep), Neville 
Marten (CB’s European Director) and 
Mario Panvini (Clash Box’ Italian 
rep). Gigliola Cinquetti, the Italina 
artist winner, is pictured with Franco 
Crepax, general manager of her label, 
C.G.D., in the left bottom shot. Shown 
in the middle bottom pic is Patricia 
Carli, performer of the winning song 
of the visitors’ team, with Giuseppe 
Giannini, general manager of C.G.D. 
International, distributors of Belair in 
Italy. In the right bottom shot Gene 
Colonnello (second from left), one of 
the composers of the winning song, 
is pictured with the lyricist Mario 
Panzeri (fourth from left). Others in 
the photo are (left to right) Neville 
Marten, Mario Panvini, Piero Sugar 
(Sugar pubberies), and Roger Maru- 
ani (Festival). 


54 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964- 


International Section 





Great Britain's Best Seilers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


1 6 

2 2 

3 1 

4 7 

5 5 

6 3 

7 4 

8 9 

9 10 

10 12 

11 13 

12 — 

13 8 

14 15 


3 Needles And Pins — The Searchers (Pye) Metric 
5 *Hippy Hippy Shake — Swinging Blue Jeans (HMV) Ard- 
more & Beechwood 

10 *Glad All Over — Dave Clark Five (Columbia) Ivy 

3 *rm The One — Gerry & The Pacemakers (Columbia) Pacer 
9 Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa — Gene Pitney (United 
Artists) Arch 

9 *I Want To Hold Your Hand — The Beatles (Parlophone) 
Northern Songs 

11 *I Only Want To Be With You — Dusty Springfield (Philips) 

Springfield 

7 Stay — The Hollies (Parlophone) Lorna 
3 As Usual — Brenda Lee (Brunswick) 

3 Don’t Blame Me — Frank Ifield (Columbia) Campbell Con- 
nelly 

4 *We Are In Love — Adam Faith (Parlophone) Poser 
1 *5-4-3-2-l— Manfred Mann (HMV) K.P.M. 

7 Swinging On A Star — Big Dee Irwin (Colpix) Chappell 
4 Do You Really Love Me Too — Billy Fury (Decca) Shapiro 
Bernstein 


15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


11 

19 

16 


24 *She Loves You — The Beatles (Parlophone) Northern Songs 

1 Diane — The Batchelors (Decca) K.P.M. 

2 *rm In Love — The Fourmost (Parlophone) Northern Songs 
1 For You — Rick Nelson (Brunswick) Feldman 

1 *I Think Of You — The Merseybeats (Fontana) Robbins 
4 Kiss Me Quick — Elvis Presley (RCA) West One 
^Denotes Local Copyright 


Great Britain 
Top Ten LP's 

1 1 With The Beatles — The 

Beatles (Parlophone) 

2 2 Please Please Me — The Bea- 

tles (Parlophone) 

3 4 West Side Story — Sound- 

track (CBS) 

4 3 How Do You Like It — 

Gerry & The Pacemakers 
( Columbia) 

5 6 Meet The Searchers — The 

Searchers (Pye) 

6 5 Born Free — Frank Ifield 

( Columbia) 

7 7 Freddie And The Dreamers 

— Freddie & The Dreamers 
(Columbia) 

8 — Fun In Acapulco — Elvis 

Presley (RCA) 

9 9 In Dreams — Roy Orbison 

( London) 

10 — Kathy Kirby Sings 16 Hits 

From Stars And Garters — 
Kathy Kirby (Decca) 


Great Britain 
Top Ten EP's 

1 1 Twist And Shout — The Bea- 

tles (Parlophone) 

2 3 The Dave Clark Five — Dave 

Clark (Columbia) 

3 5 The Rolling Stones — The 

Rolling Stones (Decca) 

4 6 Sweets For My Sweet — 

The Searchers (Pye) 

5 4 The Beatles No. 1 — The 

Beatles (Parlophone) 

6 2 The Beatles Hits — The Bea- 

tles (Parlophone) 

7 9 The Big Three At The Cav- 

ern — The Big Three (Decca) 

8 7 Peter, Paul & Mary — Peter, 

Paul & Mary (Warner 
Bros.) 

9 — Bern Elliott & The Fenmen 

— Bern Elliott (Decca) 

10 8 How Do You Do It — Gerry 

& The Pacemakers (Colum- 
bia) 


The San Remo Contest 


(Continued from page 54) 
Italian debut and it is interesting to 
note that they were the only solo 
femals artists to get into the finals. 

Although the standard was very 
high the songs heard at this year’s 
festival were somewhat lacking in 
originality and failed to produce any 
one number that could immediately be 
identified as a potential world hit. 
Beatlemania was nowhere to be found 
but there was an unprecedented 
youthfulness about San Remo 1964 
both in the songs themselves and in 
the artists chosen to sing them. The 
decision to inject new blood and rel- 
atively unknown talent into the fes- 
tival obviously proved popular with 
the judges for the list of finalists in- 
cluded the names of several artists of 
this calibre making their first appear- 
ance at San Remo, while many of the 
older favorites were eliminated on the 
first two nights. Although the result 
came as a surprise to many people 
it was generally agreed that the 
judges’ verdict was acceptable. A 
complete list of the songs entered for 
the festival was published in last 
week’s Cash Box together with the 
names of artists, record companies, 
and original publishers. Forty-eight 
hours after the close of the contest 
publishing rights of the various songs 
had been placed. 

Visitors to San Remo for the con- 
test included: 

From America: Dario Soria (di- 
visional vice president R.C.A. Victor) 
who had timed his European tour to 
coincide with the Festival; Robert 
Iverseb (executive vice president 
Southern Music): Lester Sims (gen- 
eral manager Daffodil Music Inc.) and 
A1 Wilde (Twangy Music). 

British representations included 
Jimmy Phillips and Peter Phillips of 
K.P.M.; Ben Nisbet (Feldman) and 
ace composer Mitch Murray. 


From Holland came Piet Beishuizen 
(Philips, Baarn); J.J.M. Haslinghuis 
(rnanaging director Phonogram); 
Nico Boer (A&R manager. Philips); 
and Hans Dunk (Southern Music). 

Well known personalities from 
France included publisher Rolf Mar- 
bot, Roger Maruani (Festival Rec- 
ords) ; Mr. and Mrs. Vic (Fantasia) 
and Philip Boutet (Bel Air). 

From Belgium came Mr. Roelans of 
Inelco and publisher Jean Kluger 
(World Music). 

The very strong contingent from 
Spain brought publishers Mr. Sallin- 
ger (Southern Music); Augusta Al- 
guero (Francis Day & Hunter); Julio 
Clara (Armonico); Mr. Serra of Dis- 
cos Vergara and Cash Box represent- 
ative Federico Halpern. 

(Germany was represented by Mr. 
Voigrt (Deutsche Grammophon); Mr. 
Braunlich (Teldec); Tom Meisel (Edi- 
tions Intro); Dr. Karl Heinz Busse 
(Busse Music) and Mr. Hammerling 
(Nero Music). From Sweden Felix 
Stahl (Stockholms Musik) and Ka- 
bitzky Wolf (Teldec). 

Record men and publishers from all 
over Italy who made their way to 
San Remo are too numerous to count 
but we saw Messrs. Ennio Melis, 
Mario Cantini and Ettore Zeppegno 
of RCA Italiana; Gramitto Ricci 
(Curci); Albert Carisch, Leslie An- 
nable and Giuseppe Piccolo from 
Southern Music, Milan; Mr. Riechof 
(Phonogram); Kirkor Mintangian 
(Durium); Mr. Rapetti, Mr. Micocci 
and Mr. Salvini of Ricordi; John Lee 
(Voce Del Padrone); Dr. L. Sugar, 
Giuseppe Giannini and Franco Cre- 
pax from C.G.D. who presented the 
winning song; Alfredo Rossi (Aris- 
ton); Mr. Ansoldi (Ri-Fi) Carlo Al- 
berto Rossi (Juke Box); Walter Gurt- 
ler ( Gurtler & Saar) ; Ezio Leoni 
( A.&R) and Bruno Pozza (Produzioni 
Nr). 



BRITAIN 



One of the most interesting aspects of the new Pye-Hickory tie up is the 
signing by Hickory of British star Lonnie Donegan to record in Nashville. The 
announcement was made by Wesley Rose at the Hickory reception in London 
recently when he paid tribute to the progressive methods of Pye Records, the 
talents of its British roster of artists and Donegan in particular. 

Agent-Manager-Impresario Cyril Berlin currently on a round-the-world busi- 
ness trip taking in Singapore, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Aukland, New 
York and Bermuda. In Bermuda, Berlin will see his artists Miki and Griff play- 
ing in cabaret and will also complete arrangements for Lonnie Donegan’s re- 
turn visit in April after he has been to Nashville to cut his first recordings for 
Hickory. In Australia and New Zealand Berlin will finalize arrangements for 
the two-week one-night stand tour he has negotiated for The Beatles scheduled 
to commence on June 17 in Sydney. He has also completed negotiations for the 
highly successful show “Black Nativity” to tour Australia and New Zealand in 
the autumn. 

Latest Board of Trade figures show that manufacturers sales of records in 
November 1963 were more than a third higher than in November 1962. Home 
sales with a rise of over two fifths, accounted for almost all the increase. 
(Without doubt this rise can be attributed to The Beatles.) Production of all 
categories of disks continued to expand in November. Output of 33 l/3rd and 
45 r.p.m. disks were over a third and a tenth more respectively than a year 
earlier. There was another marked increase in production of 78 r.p.m. 

American genius in the shape of Phil Spector hit London last week. Spector, 
whose Philles recording company has created many stars during its eighteen 
months existence, was guest of honour at a cocktail party hosted by Decca 
Records at its new Marlborough Street nremises. Among the many guests were 
The Ronettes, who Spector took to the No. 1 spot in America with “Baby I Love 
You.” During his stay in Britain Spector appeared on BBC TV’s “Juke Box 
Jury” and A-R TV’s “Ready, Steady, Go.” 

Having appeared with The Beatles at the Olympia, Paris, Trini Lopez is now 
touring Austria, Belgium and Holland. Having scored a resounding success in 
Britain with his single “If I Had A Hammer” and his L.P. “Trini Lopez at 
P.J.’s,” Pye should have another success with his current Reprise E.P. “A-me- 
ri-ca.” 

Classical releases from E.M.I. in February include Wagner’s “Lohengrin” 
played by The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Rudolf Kempe with 
Jess Thomas in the title role. The opera, issued on the Angel label, comprises 
five disks marketed in a special presentation box complete with an English 
translation of the original German text. The recordings are also available sepa- 
j rately. Highlights from Massenet’s ’’Herodiade” (the only recording available) 

1 are available on HMV played by the Theatre National de I’Opera, Paris con- 
ducted by Georges Prete. Leaflets giving both French and English text are pro- 
vided with the recording. The beautiful voice of Luisa Tetrazzini can be heard 
I on “Operatic Arias And Songs” on the H.M.V. label taken from recordings 
i made in 1908-1913. 

I EMI Records this month has put out a series of language tuition disks 
“Learn (French) in Record Time.” First release includes French, Gei'man, 
Spanish and Italian. Supplied in a presentation box the course comprises seven 
records plus an instruction book as a cost of £4. 15. 0. ($13.30). Courses in Rus- 
sian and German are being prepared for future release. 

Dario Soria, vice president international department of RCA Victor, in 
Europe to attend the San Remo Song Festival and subsequently to join up with 
I Peter Baumberger in Rome for a trip to Germany and possibly England before 
returning to the United States in the middle of February. 

Manager Derek Boulton informs that he has signed singer Sheila Southern 
and bandleader Eric Delaney to a series of half-hour TV shows titles “Beauty 
And The Beat” for Border Television. Hopes are high for the London area 
screening in the near future. The Hedley Ward Trio has also Keen signed for a 
series of programs for Border TV. 

I In the RCA Dynagroove series Henry Mancini, A1 Hirt and Perez Prado join 
[ forces for “3 Great Bands;” Hank Locklin, Hank Snow and Porter Wagoner 
I combine their talents for “3 Country Gentlemen” and Ann Margaret, Kitty 
i Kallen and Della Reese vocalise on “3 Great Girls.” Other releases on Dyna- 
groove include “September Song” by Jimmy Durante; “Bill Haley’s Chicks;” 
j “The Fabulous Fifties” with tracks by Ted Heath, Frank Chacksfield, Vera 
Lynn, Lonnie Donegan and “Bill Black’s Greatest Hits.” Decca also issuesd four 
country albums by George Hamilton IV “Abeline;” “At The Hootenanny;” “The 
Many Voices of Miriam Makeba” and “Josh White.” In the jazz field Decca have 
i put out six albums including “Lambert, Hendricks and Baven At Newport ’63;” 
j “Gloria Lynne At The Thunderbird” and “Fats At The Organ.” 
j Because of heavy business commitments elsewhere, EMI Chairman, Sir 
' Joseph Lockwood, has had to postpone his intended visit to The States. It is 
i hoped that the trip will take place within a few weeks. 

Gene Pitney, hot from the San Remo Song Contest, arrives in this country 
March 1st to commence a four-week British tour. To coincide with the visit, 
EMI Records is issuing his latest United Artist single “That Girl Belongs To 
Yesterday.” Gene is currently having his first taste of British chart success 
with “Twenty Four Hours From Tulsa.” Also touring with Gene will be British 
artistes Billy J. Kramer and Cilia Black. 

Decca has captured on disk the popular Saturday morning BBC disk show 
“Saturday Club.” The LP features tracks by all time favorites including Brian 
Poole and the Tremeloes, Jet Harris and Tony Meehan, Kathy Kirby, Karl 
j Denver and The Tornados. Not to be outdone Associated Rediffusion’s popular 
I Friday night TV show “Ready, Steady Go” has a Decca LP tagged after the 
show. This, too, features Brian Poole and The Tremeloes, Kathy Kirby, Bern 
Elliott and the Fenmen, The Tornados etc. 

! 

* Quickies: Hickory star Kris Jensen made his debut on ABC TV’s “Thank Your 
Lucky Stars” February 1 . . . The Crystals on same show February 15 . . . 
j Latest Joe Brown waxing on Piccadilly “You Do Thinks To Me” . . . Decca 
j single in the West Indian rhythm now catching on here aptly titled “Blue Beat” 
I by The Beazers . . . New E.P. by Cliff Richard and The Shadows “When In 
France” (Columbia) . . . After a spell away from the charts Adam Faith has 
firmly re-established himself with “The First Time” and “We Are In Love” and 
now comes an EP “Top Of The Pops” (Parlophone) . . . Top Italian star Milva 
: makes her British bow via Oriole Records and “Loneliness Of Autumn” . . . 
j Ethel Merman takes over from Alma Cogan for a season at “Talk Of The 
I Town” . . . Pye recoi’ding star Mark Wynter celebrated 21st birthday February 
2 . . . Within three weeks of release, The Searchers “Needles And Pins” on 
Pye has qualified for a Silver Disk with sales well over the quarter million 
: mark . . . Fourth Silver Disk, too, for Gerry and the Pacemakers for their 
! current Columbia release “I’m The One.” 


The Best in Britain. ..Bens 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 infernafionai Section 


55 


mm SCANDINAVIA 


DENMARK 

Swedish group The Spotnicks, recording for Swe-Disc in Stockholm and 
frequent guests on the charts in several European and Asian countries, will 
do their Danish debut on April 2 or 3 with concerts in Odense and Copenhagen. 
The group will stop in Denmark on their way back to Sweden from Belgium. 

The Beatles moved to a top position on the Danish charts with their “She 
Loves You’’ at Parlophone this week. Their “I Want To Hold Your Hand” 
appears at the fifth spot. 

It has not yet been decided which artist who will be the ninth contracted 
for the local Danish Song Festival on Feb. 15. However, most people expect 
that Jorgen Ingmann and his daughter will accept the offer. Ingmann and 
his wife Grethe were winning the Eurovision Song Contest in London last 
year with their “Dansevise.” 


NORWAY 

Norway’s Wenche Myhre continues as a record breaker, having her latest 
record, a Norwegian version of the German song “Ich Geh’ Noch Zur Schule” 
entering the charts this week. With this, Miss Myhre has done what no 
other artist has been able to, getting all her latest four recordings on the 
charts. Jorg-Fr. Ellertsen of Egil Monn Iversen A/S reports to Cash Box 
that he is expecting a lot from a new record made for Triola by The Quivers 
and The Key Brothers. The titles are “Since I Lost You” and “Get Out,” 
and Metronome will handle the release outside Norway, Ellertsen said. 
He also reported that his company is expecting two Silver Disks in a near 
future, one for Pat Boone for “Speedy Gonzales” on Dot and — eventually — 
one for Wenche Myhre for her “Gi Meg En Cowboy Til Mann” (Ich Will 
’Nen Cowboy Als Mann) on Triola. A Silver Disk is awarded by a Norwegian 
daily when a record has sold 25,000. 

Iversen & Frogh A/S, local EMI distributor, has made a record titled 
“Stavangerfjord, Du Kjaere” (Stavangerfjord, My Beloved), sung by Jens 
Book-Jensen on HMV. The song is a regard to the veteran flagship of the 
Norwegian-American Line, Stavangerfjord, which after many years will be 
replaced by a more modern ship. On Columbia, the same company has a local 
record with appeals to the Olympic Winter Games, now taking place at 
Innsbruck in Austria. Veteran singers Gunnar Engedahl and Erling Stordahl, 
two blind singers, has just made a song titled “Elisabeth” on the Odeon label. 

The Melody Grand Prix, the local Norwegian Song Festival, will take place 
Feb. 15. No titles or names of artists are available yet. The winning song 
will represent Norway in Copenhagen, March 21st. 

FINLAND 


Tesvisio Oy, commercial TV company which has been in operation for 
several years, was sensationally sold to the government-owned Suomen Tele- 
visio, which now has obtained its long awaited monopoly. It was an affair 
of 6.5 millions markka (around $2,000,000). Officially, all parts are very 
happy with the affair. However, a lot of people sound less happy about the 
situation. Usually reliable sources have told Cash Box that if Tesvisio been 
allowed to expand, the economical situation of the company would never 
have been so bad that this step would be taken. However, the privately 
owned commercial company has often been stopped from expanding the way 
it wanted, and finally Tesvisio decided that selling out to the government 
TV company was the only acceptable solution. 

A new luxury tax has raised the prices on records in Finland. Singles 
went up from Mka 4:90 to 5:50 and EPs from 8:90 to 9:50. Prices on LPs 
are unchanged, however. 

The sale of Tesvisio to the government TV company is not the only affair 
that has caused headlines here recently. On the island group Ahvenanmaa 
in the Gulf of Bothnia, between Sweden and Finland, people have for a long 
time been complaining about the poor quality of the TV programs, not 
artistically but technically. The authorities in Helsinki replied that it was 
too difficulty and too expensive to build a local TV station at the island. 
A local businessman took the chance and placed a big antenna in a water- 
tower, and combined with some other simple equipment, for a few days the 
people on the islands could follow the Swedish TV programs perfectly. How- 
ever, it didn’t take too long before the police came and destroyed this private 
“station” as illegal, and filed suit against the businessman. Most people got 
a big laugh and feel that the businessman made it difficult for the authorities 
in Helsinki to find excuses for the bad receiving possibilities in the future. 
After all, the government should be able to do what a private person could 
do. Other headlines report that also the Finnish TV has got its strike, like 
what the radio and TV in Sweden have had since Dec. 1, last year. Starting 
Feb. 1, members of the Actors’ Union are involved in a strike against Finnish 
TV. Only very few recording artists are members of the Union, and according 
to reports to Cash Box, artists in the pop field cannot be involved in the 
conflict the way it has happened in Sweden. 


SWEDEN 

New sheet music from Cedarwood (Scandinavia) AB includes “Detroit 
City by Danny Hill and Mel Tillis and “I’m Gonna Bring You Down” with 
Swedish lyrics (“Jag Ska Nog Ta Dej Ner Pa Jorden”) by Ben Hur. Belinda 
(Scandinavia) AB has released “L’Amour S’en Va” by Francoise Hardy with 
Swedish lyrics by Bobson. 

A Scandinavian RCA Victor meeting has taken place in Stockholm. Here 
event were Bengt Liljeroth and Johan Vikstedt of Oy Discophon Ah 
m HMsinki, Elith Henriksen of Hede Nielsen’s Fabrikker A/S in Copenhagen 
and Eilif Meyer of A/S Nera in Oslo. Also here for biz talks were Peter 
Baumberger and his assistant A. Grob from Geneva, Karl Heinz Richter, 
Teldec in Hamburg and Peter Ingversen of RCA Division 
at Teldec. Sixten Eriksson, head of RCA Victor (Grammofon AB Electra) 
m Sweden was happy to report a growing sale of prerecorded tapes in Sweden. 
On his way to Stockholm is Lee Shapiro of RCA Victor, New York. It is 
to expect that some of the RCA people in the other Scandinavian countries 
returned to Stockholm to meet Shapiro. 

Doing very well in Denmark as well as all over Sweden is Chrichan and 
The Gamblers with “Answer Me, My Love’7“Apron Strings.” They are 
recording for Viking Records, a small company operating in Lund in southern 
Sweden, but are distributing thru Cupol in Cupol. 

. ^^^^iP®-Sonora AB includes “You Don’t Own Me”/ 
Run Bobby, Run” with Lesley Gore on Mercury, “The Love Of A Boy”/ 
Heart” with Dionne Warwick on Fontana and “It’s 
A Mad Mad Mad World”/“Jive Is The Thing” with The Shirelles, also on 
Fontana. 

releases from Karusell Grammofon AB include “Lesson Two”/ 
Lobsters, “That Lucky Old Sun” with Ray Charles, 
Your Love”_ with Jerry Butler, all on Karusell, 
Your Precious Love” with Garnet Mimms and 
7-1 ^n«ia^ers on United Artists, and “Isle Of Capri”/“True Confession” 
vntn rats Domino on California. Swe-Disc, distributing thru Karusell, has 



ABC-Paramount 


• 9, 

14, 

27 

Amy 




92 

Atco 




46 

Atlantic 

. . . 53, 

82, 

88, 

95 

Best 




44 

Cadence 




48 

Cameo 


25, 

68, 

90 

Canadian American . . . 




70 

Capitol 

... 1, 

31, 

72, 

81 

Chattaooche 




21 

Checker 




59 

Chess 




85 

Coed 




47 

Columbia .... 5, 13, 

18, 57, 

74, 

97, 

99 

Congress 




45 

DCP 




87 

Decca 



8, 

22 

Dot 



29, 

30 

Everest 



38, 

71 

Epic 



11, 

24 

Era 




91 

Garrett 



19, 

86 

Gordy 




56 

Hi 




75 

Imperial 




93 

Kapp 




94 

King 




34 

Liberty 




49 


Marc 

Mercury ... 

MGM 

Montel 

Motown ... 
Musicor . . . . 

Okeh 

Parkway . . . 

Philips 

Philles 

RCA Victor . . 

Reprise 

Rivieria . . . . 
Roulette . . . . 

Scepter . . . . 

Smash 

Soundstage 7 
Spokane . . . . 

Stax 

Sue 

Swan 

20th Fox ... 
United Artists 

VeeJay 

Volt 

Valiant .... 

Wand 

Warner Bros. 


36 

. . . . 2, 32, 54, 62 
69, 76, 80, 83, 89 

17 

.... 63, 77 
50 

4 

16, 41, 51 

... 10, 23, 64 
55, 96 

6, 33, 58, 60, 65 

35 

15 

79 

12 

40, 84 

20 

100 

52 

67 

3, 37 

28 

26 

. . . 43, 61, 73, 98 

66 

78 

42 

7, 39 


In answer to numerous requests for such a service CASH BOX will run the Top 100 Labels feature on a 
weekly basis. It has been designed primarily as an aid to our internationai readers desiring a capsule 
summary of labels they carry and their representation on the CASH BOX Top 100. Feature can also be 
a handy order guide for distribs, racks, dealers and one-stops ordering disks by labels. 


HELSINKI — The local Song Festival 
of 1964 has started. This year, Suo- 
men Yleis-radio-Televisio (Finland’s 
Broadcasting-TV Co.) invited ten com- 
posers (who all have participated in 
the local Festival in previous years) 
to write one song each. 

On one of the first days in February 
a first Festival takes place with all 
ten songs. Juries in ten cities will be 
voting, and four of the ten songs will 
be eliminated from the competition. 
Feb. 15, there will be a final, and the 
winning song at this time will repre- 
sent Finland at the Eurovision Song 
Contest in Copenhagen on March 21st. 
The ten songs are as follows: 

“Pianonsoittaja” (The Pianist) 
Composer: Erik Lindstrom. Singer: 
Erkki Liikanen (Safir) 

“Tulen Jalkeen” (After The Fire). 
Composer: Eino Hurme. Singer: Iris 
Rautio (Decca) 

“Kerran VieT ” (Once Again). Com- 
poser: Borje Sundgren. Singer: Irmeli 
Makela (Columbia) 


“Satelliitti Kahdelle” (A Satellite 
For Two). Composer: Kauko Kaarti- 
nen. Singer: Kai Lind (Scandia) 
“Laiskotellen” (Being Lazy). Com- 
poser and singer: Lasse Martenson 
(Philips) 

“Toisen Kerran” (Another 'Time). 
Composer: Erkki Rahkola. Singer: 
Heikki Aarva (Safir) 

Tango Keittiossa” (Tango In The 
Kitchen). Composer: Arvo Koskimaa. 
Singer: Vieno Kekkonen (Scandia) 
“Unen Ihme” (The Wonder Of 
Dreams). Composer: Jorma Panula. 
Singer: Stig Franskman (RCA Vic- 
tor) 

“Bzzz, Bzzz, Bzzz.” Composer: Kari 
Tuomisaari. Singer: Pirkko Mannola 
(Scandia) 

“Rakkauden Rikkaus” (The Rich- 
ness Of Love). Composer: Toivo 
Karki. Singer: Taisto Tammi (Decca) 
The composers were asked to choose 
the artist they liked to perform their 
songs in the competition. 


SCANDIA (Cont’d) 

an EP with The Shy Ones, another EP with Ernie England, and “Swinging 
On A Star” with Ray Pilgrim, “Glad All Over” with The 'Typhoons and 
“Dominique” with Jeanette Michel. The Ernie Englund EP is titled “Ernie’s 
Choice from Cash Box Top 100,” while the three singles are the first records 
in a serial introduced as “Tops picked from New Musical Express.” 

Billy J. Kramer, British top selling artist, in town for concerts. Telstar 
Productions, arranging the concerts here, introduced him to the press at 
a special party at Hotel Apollonia on Friday, Jan. 31. 

Hasse Wallman has been appointed head of the publicity dept, at Grammofon 
AB Electra (RCA Victor) in Solna. Pelle Nystrom, publicity man at Metro- 
nome, leaves the company March 1, and becomes Swedish representative 
for the Norwegian record company Manu. 

The Swedish Elvis Presley fans got 24 hours of happiness when a daily 
here reported that Elvis Presley would make a two or three day tour in 
Sweden this spring or summer for approx $100,000 a day. However, the next 
day came the news that there would be no Presley tour at all, and further- 
more, no negotiations had been going on. 


Norway's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles/Parlophone) 
Edition Lyche 

Dominique (The Singing Nun/Philips) Norsk Musikforlag 
A/S 


3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 


3 14 She Loves You (The Beatles/Parlophone) Edition Lyche 

6 2 Glad All Over (Dave Clark Five/Columbia) Norsk Musik- 

forlag A/S 

8 2 Maria Elena (Los Indios Tabajaras/RCA Victor) Southern 

Music AB 

5 10 Don’t Talk To Him (Cliff Richard/Columbia) Belinda 

(Scandinavia) AB 

4 16 Detroit City (Bobby Bare/RCA Victor) Cedarwood (Scan- 

dinavia) AB 

— 1 Jeg Gar Pa Skole (Ich Geh’ Noch Zur Schule) (Wenche 

Myhre/Triola) Egil Monn Iversen A/S 

— 1 Hippy Hippy Shake (The Swinging Blue Jeans/HMV) 

Imudico A/S 

7 11 *Dagling Liv I Folkehjemmet (Ragnhild Michelsen-Rolf 

Just Nilsen/RCA Victor) 


56 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964- 


'International Section 


Cdshrsox' 


ARGENTINA 



As we reported last week, during the fourth week of January Mr. and _Mrs. 
Joe Orleck paid a visit to Argentina and Brazil, and are now in Mexico. Miguel 
Smirnoff, Cash Box representative in Argentina, went with them to Brazil and 
was present during the interviews held with the toppers of the record com- 
panies and publishers in that area. 

Enrique Lebendiguer of Fermata Publishers of Brazil is busy expanding the 
record division of his company, currently representing Atlantic, United Artists 
and other foreign companies. Fermata acts as a producer. The distribution is 
made by RCA through its sales organization. Lebendiger recently inked “Domi- 
nique,” which has been released by Philips in the original version of Soeur 
Sourire. Portuguese lyrics have been prepared and cover version are being 
expected. 

Vicente Mangione of Euterpe Publishers is busy with several Carnival tunes 
for Rio’s 1964 Carnival, which is a big event in this country. Mangione has 
printed and is distribution for promotional purposes a book containing 64 
tunes, already recorded and under air play. Some of the titles are “A Hora E 
Essa,” “Ate O Luar,” “Marcha Do Cegonha” and “Maria Do Rebolao.” He plans 
to travel to Buenos Aires in Mid-February. 

Sebastiao Bastos of Audio Fidelity works on the promotion in other coun- 
tries of the recordings made by his diskery in Brazil. One of its latest releases 
is “Organ-Samba-Percussion,” recorded by Andre Penassi. This LP has been 
or will be released in France, the U.S., Canada, and several other countries 
from Europe, due to an agreement made with Philips in that area. Sydney 
Frey, director of Audio Fidelity in the States, will visit Brazil, February 25, 
probably going to Argentina a few days later. 

Jose Scatena is working on the promotion of a new album recorded by Agos- 
tinho Dos Santos. He recently organized a press conference and deejay meet- 
ing in Rio de Janeiro to present the LP, which contains samba music with 
modern treatment and arrangements. | 

Othon Russo of CBS, in Rio, is also working on several new releases. Artists 
include lark Marisa Barroso, musician and arranger Astor Silva — who’s also j 
artistic director of the label — and others. Several Carnival music launchings i 
are also included. | 

Philips is busy at work with the promotion of the first Jorge Ben album, i 
“Samba-Esquema Novo,” which could be properly tagged “After The Bossa | 
Nova.” The LP featured the latest current in Brazilian music, and has been j 
very well received by the deejays and customers. The label is now preparing { 
the second album by Ben, who has suddenly turned into a first rated star. Other | 
Philips outings include a new album by Brigitte Bardot, whose stay in Rio j 
meant very nice publicity for her, and one more by local Tampa Trio, also with j 
modern Brazilian tunes. j 

As in Argentina, Brazilian RCA is cashing in the current trend towards I 
Italian artists in South America. Nico Fidenco, Sergio Endrigo and Rita Pavone i 
are among the top stars, and their records are very well sold. Up to now, RCA I 
has two albums by Fidenco, one by Endrigo, and several singles. It is also sell- | 
ing very well Italian selection albums “Alta Presione.” ! 

Odeon is also working hard on its Italian artists. Among these are names 
like Pino Donaggio and Peppino de Capri. On the local side there are also many 
recordings being done, mostly in the modern style. 

Among the new companies, probably the most dynamic one is Aloysio de 
Oliveira’s “Elenco” label, devoted almost completely to Bossa Nova and mod- 
ern arrangements. Among its artists are Vinicius de Moraes, one of the coun- ; 
try’s top composers and currently Brazilian ambassador to France, Sylvia j 
Telles, Antonio Carlos Jobim and others. Elenco works mostly in the LP field 
and is also distributed by RCA. 

The whole industry is preparing itself for the next meeting of the Latin 
American Federation of Record Producers, which will take place in Mexico 
City next April. Most companies will be present at the event, programmed 
every two years. This will be the third gathering. The first one took place in 
Rio and the second in Lima, Peru. Representatives from all the other record 
producing Latin American countries will be also present there. 


Sweden's Best Sellers 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 


I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles/Parlophone) 
Sonora Musikfdrlags AB 

Glad All Over (The Dave Clark Five/Columbia) Ehrling 
& Lofvenholm 

Beautiful Dreamer (John Leyton/HMV) Southern Music 
AB 


4 4 

5 3 

6 6 

7 10 

8 — 

9 9 

10 8 


18 She Loves You (The Beatles/Parlophone) Sonora Musik- 
forlags AB 

9 Diggety Doggety (The Streaplers/Odeon) Edition Odeon 
6 I Like It Like That (Larry Finnegan/Sonet) No publisher 

2 500 Miles Away From Home (Bobby Bare/RCA Victor) 
Bens Music AB 

1 Go Back To Daddy (Pat Wayne/Columbia) Edition Odeon 

3 Dominique (The Singing Nun/Philips) Nordiska Musik- 
forlaget 

5 Johnny Loves Me (Suzie/Sonet) Sonet Music 


Ccish Bm< ^ GERMANY 


Does Germany have Beatlemania? That is the question most asked of us 
by foreign reps today. The Beatles have swept the world with their sound 
and their records top the hit parade in almost every country in Europe and 
America, but one of their disks has not yet made its way into the top 
10 in Germany. Germany does not yet have Beatlemania, but it will cer- 
tainly get it. Although the stateowned radio stations are a little slow to 
accept the sound, the juke boxes are already full of records by The Beatles, 
and the newspapers and fan magazines are full of stories about the group. 
Electrola reports that 3 of their singles, “Twist And Shout,” “She Loves You” 
and “I Want To Hold Your Hand” are selling like hotcackes and a new 
single has already been released from their LP. The LP is also doing very 
well here. German record firms are already frantically looking for German 
groups that sound like the Beatles, and the group is planning a trip here 
this Spring. That ought to put the nail in its place and drive the group into 
the hearts and onto the record players of the German teenagers. 

Publisher-composer Rudi Von Der Dovenmuhle and A&R man — lyricist 
Nils Nobach are happy people these days. Their last composition won the 
German Pop Music Festival and went on to sell over % million records here. 
Although Nils works for Ariola, their last hit as composers were on Elec- 
trola/Columbia with Gittee and “I Want To Marry A Cowboy.” Tbeir newest 
work is called “It’s Easy To Get Used To Beautiful Things” and has won 
the Gei'man competition for the “Song For Europe” contest to be held in 
March in Copenhagen. The singer is Ariola’s Nora Nova, who is produced by 
Nils so if the record hits, it will be a double success for the writing team 
on the publishing and producing side as well. 

Ariola announces that Frank Sinatra Junior is coming to Germany for a 
TV show here and will probably produce his first German speaking record 
for the firm. He will also appear on American army bases here. 

Ariola has renewed their contract with Reprise Records and will continue 
to distribute the label here and in Austria. W&G Record Processing Co. 
in Melbourne Australia has taken over the Ariola-Eurodisc label for that 
country. Ariola-Eurodisc now has distribution in 35 countries. 

Sabine Specht from Song Edition writes to tell me that the new Ariola 
waxing by Peggy Peters is beginning to move and that “Little Eeefin Annie” 
is catching on like wildfire especially the German version on Polydor by 
Ted Hobbs with “16 Miles” on the flip side. 

Rolf Budde reports a great start in the new year with Marlene Dietrich’s 
German version of “Blowing In The Wind,” Conny Froboess, top lOer “3 
Musketiere,” Rita Pavone’s smash hit “If I Was A Boy” and “Yokohama 
Baby” by Thomas Fritsch, all in German. 

RCA Victor’s Little Peggy March recently visited Germany where her sec- 
ond German record was premiered during a Caterina Valente nation wide 
TV show on January 18. The Vienna Boys Choir who are now touring the 
USA have recorded the German high masses by Michael Haydn and Franz 
Schubert for Philips Records. German Vogue has released the first German 
waxing of The Searchers. The sides are German versions of “Sugar & Spice,” 
the group’s big English hit, and the big American tune “Money.” 

Electrola has signed former Philips singer Willy Hagara to a long term 
contract. Willy has recorded an LP of Vienna standards and the German 
version of “There I’ve Said It Again” as his first single effort for the firm. 

Electrola’s Ralf Bendix will tour the USA from the first to the 25th of 
February. The singer will be guest in several cities and 3 German radio 
stations in New York City alone will broadcast 2 one hour Ralf Bendix shows 
during his first week there. 

Polydor reports that Helmut Zacharias will be doing another TV show in 
Barcelona, Spain on the 2nd of March. Helmut will then head for Portugal 
for a TV shot there. 

CBS press man Lothar Graf is doing a fine job pushing the waxings of 
Little Stevie Wonder and the firm’s first number 1 hit in Germany, “You 
Can Never Stop Me Loving You” by Bernd Spier in German. 

Karl Breuer of Sikorski Music reports that tunes from their house took 
2nd and 3rd place in the German tests for the “Song For Europe” contest. 
The records were sung by Gitta Lind for Teldec and Fred Bertelmann for 
Polydor. 

Theodor O. Seeger of Peer Music reports that executive vice president of 
the Peer Southern Organization R. P. Iversen visited Hamburg recently for 
talks there with his firm. 

Jimmy Makulis, German Vogue singing star dropped Cash Box a card 
from the USA where he is making his first trip for appearances in New 
York, Chicago and Los Angeles. 

Trini Lopez is certainly the U.S. star of the day in Germany. His records 
are best sellers and he has 2 of the top 10 which is almost unheard of 
for a foreign star or for that matter a German star. Trini recently did a 
show for 2nd German TV and will be coming to Germany for a tour here. 
He will also soon be making his first German discing. It looks like Trini 
is here to stay and Ariola/Reprise Records have a top hit maker on their 
hands. That’s it for this week in Germany. 

Germany's Best Sellers 


Denmark's Best Sellers 

This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Chart 

12 9 She Loves You (The Beatles/Parlophone) Multitone A/S 

2 5 6 I’ve Got A Lovely Bunch Of Cocoanuts (The Sunbeams/ 

Manu) Imudico A/S 

3 1 12 Johnny Loves Me (Suzie/Sonet) Sonet Music 

4 7 3 *Du Skal Bare Ta’ Det Roligt (Gitte/HMV) Imudico A/S 

5 — 5 1 Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles/Parlophone) 

Multitone A/S 

6 3 7 Dominique (The Singing Nun/Philips) Wilhelm Hansen, 

Musik-Forlag 

7 8 3 Be My Baby (The Ronettes/London) Belinda (Scandinavia) 

AB 

8 4 10 Don’t Talk To Him (Cliff Richard/Columbia) Belinda 

(Scandinavia) AB 

9 10 3 Beautiful Dreamer (John Leyton/HMV) Southern Music 

AB 

10 6 11 Drina (Mars na Drini) (Jorgen Ingmann/Metronome) 

Stockholms Musikproduktion 
*Local copyright 


This Last Weeks 
Week Week On Charts 

11 2 Das Kannst Du Mir Nicht Verbieten (You can never stop 

Me Loving You)— Bernd Spier — CBS — Edition Accord 

2 2 10 *Wenn Ich Ein Junge Waer (If I Was A Boy) — Rita Pavone 

— RCA Victor — Rolf Budde Music 

3 3 14 Rote Lippen Soli Man Kuessen (Lucky Lips) — Cliff Rich- 

ard — Columbia — Hans Gerig Music 

4 4 7 *Drei Musketiere (Three Musketeers) — Conny Froeboess — 

Electrola — Metronom/Froeboess/Busse 

5 5 9 *Es Gibt Kein Bier Auf Hawaii (There’s no beer in Hawaii) 

■ — Paul Kuhn — Columbia — Paul C. R. Arends Music 

6 6 2 America — Trini Lopez — Ariola/Reprise — Schirmer Comp/ 

Chappell/August Seith 

7 7 4 Bossa Nova Baby — Elvis Presley/Bill Ramsey/Ted Herold 

— RCA/ Columbia/Polydor — Aberbach Music 

8 10 3 *Nachts Hoer’ Ich Immer Alle Uhren Schlagen (At Night, 

I Always Hear All The Clocks Strike) — Peter Alexander — 
Polydor — Hans Gerig Music 

9 8 10 If I Had A Hammer — Trini Lopez — Ariola/Reprise — Lud- 

low/Hans Gerig Music 

10 9 13 *Rosmarie — Pat Boone — London — Melodie Der Welt 

* Original German Copyright 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


International Section 



Dick Riendeau and his charming secretary, Monique Leroux, played host to a 
wide cross section of radio and TV people at a reception in Montreal’s El Mo- 
rocco (27/1) for A1 Martino. A1 was present and mingled with the guests 
throughout the afternoon and evening. Copies of the new Martino album were 
presented to deejays attending the aifair, many of w'hom drove from neighbour- 
ing cities as far as a hundred mile away to meet the great Capitol artist. His 
current single, 'T Love You More And More Everyday” is now well established 
as a heavy air play item, and steady best seller from coast to coast in Canada. 
The Feb. 1st. edition of Cash Box proved to be a happy addition to the festivi- 
ties as it contained an excellent review of the new Martino album, “Living A 
Lie,” and singled out the latest Martino single as a “Sure Shot.” Later in the 
evening, the charming Cathy Carr and her husband Ron Cash, who just re- 
cently acquired ownership of the Montreal night spot, El Morocco, where A1 
Martino was appearing, renewed some old acquaintances and established some 
new ones with deejays present at the gathering for Al. Cathy is about to re- 
cord again in the near future. Many of the radio types in attendance at the re- 
ception cut interviews with Al Martino. He seemed to be especially popular 
with the lady interviewers as several of them made sure to get interviews on 
tape before they took their leave. 

Shila Rodgers of CFMB, Montreal found the young singing star a most will- 
ing interviewee in a broadcast she recorded right in the night spot for one of 
her daily morning programs on the Montreal outlet. ATs conductor-accompani- 
est, Al Lerner, is no stranger to this part of the country. Al has been travelling 
to this country for many years with many of the most outstanding singers in 
the business. He most recently was in eastern Canada as conductor-accom- 
paniest for Jimmie Rodgers. Al was busily cutting up old touches with friends 
from the Montreal-Ottawa area, but took time to tell C.B. that he has just 
recorded four sides for release shortly as singles. As a matter of fact, the two 
singles have already been released in Australia by W and G. Deejays would 
be well advised to keep an ear open for the North American release of this fine 
record product by one of the more talented musicians in the business today. 

Also appearing in Montreal was home town boy, Maynard Ferguson, and 
his thirteen-piece jazz orchestra. They had the jazz buffs of the Metropolis in 
a really swinging mood with the sounds they were putting down in the Casa 
Loma. Another pretty, female broadcaster, CKVL’s June Warren, recorded an 
interview with Maynard between shows. 

The management of the night spot where Maynard and his band were ap- 
pearing had arranged for leading-lights of the deejay and press fraternity to 
be their guests for the Ferguson show. They were unanimous in their endorse- 
ment of the swinging sounds produced by the famous jazz man and his crew. 
Bill Smithers of Quality was on hand to see that the press and radio types had 
opportunities to meet and chat with the Montreal-born musician who has made 
such a fine name for himself through his great horn work, both on record and 
in person, the World over. 

A recent Cash Box visitor was Pat Hervey. She dropped in with RCA Victor 
men, Mike Doyle, and George Richard to visit with deejays at Ottawa’s CKOY, 
and to meet the public at an autograph pai'ty the same day at one of the Capi- 
tal’s leading retail outlets, Sherman’s Music Land. A large number of Pat’s 
fans turned out to see her at the record shop. She is currently riding high in 
Ottawa, and several other Canadian markets with an RCA Victor side that is 
easily her best record in her career to date. “Walking In Bonnie’s Footsteps,” 
is the top side of the good girl singer’s latest for the RCA folks. As always she 
was a most charming and gracious guest in a broadcast chat with CKOY, P.D., 
Bill Lee. Mike Doyle is really pepping up the promotion side of the picture at 
RCA Victor on a national scale. In the short period of time he has held the 
reins he has developed several contests designed for tie in’s with the country’s 
broadcasters. They center around new RCA Victor record produced by John 
Gary, Dick Damron, and the outstanding new documentary package by Huntley 
and Brinkley, “A Time To Keep.” Another good, recent release that has both 
promo and sales types at RCA Victor very happy is the new set by The Living 
Strings, “Music To Help You Stop Smoking.” Whether it really helps beat the 
habit or not, it’ll be a hot item with dealers everywhere. Mike has nothing but 
high hopes for a couple of outstanding new RCA Victor singles, “Kissin’ Cous- 
ins”/“It Hurts Me,” the new pairing by Elvis follows the usual Presley policy 
of baking a moover with a more subdued outing. Again, both will be big. An- 
other single that has RCA Victor types very excited is the latest by Los Indi- 
es Tabajaras, “Always In My Heart”/“Moonlight And Shadows” is the pairing 
that should carry the instrumental duo right back to the top ten chart area. 
Other new singles of note from RCA, include items by The Cascades, John D. 
Loudermilk and Paul Anka. Be on the lookout for a new proposal about to be 
made to the Countrys’ broadcasters by RCA Victor, concerning promotion re- 
leases. 

Grant Foster of CFOX, Pointe Claire (Montreal) is in the market for top 
name C&W record talent to book in the Montreal area. He has already been 
responsible for some of the biggest country shows in the Canadian metropolis, 
and is anxious to line up other big names for Montreal area appearances. 

“Hootenanny Express” by The Canadian Sweethearts is rapidly developing 
into a solid chart item in Canada. It is getting both pop and country air ex- 
posure in king sized doses. It’s a real happy sound that has the folks flocking 
to buy. The Quality people indicate that the side, originating with A&M in the 
U.S., is going to be one of their hottest singles all across Canada in a very short 
while. 

Even non-rock jocks will dig the new LP by The Dixiebelles. The kids, Shir- 
ley Thomas, Mary Hunt and Mildred Pratcher, have happily combined the good 
old dixie sounds of years gone by with the modern sound that sells records by 
the fistful, and that’s just what they’re doing, selling records by the fist full. 
They are already top chai’t items with their single, “Southtown U.S.A.,” (it’s 
on the LP by the way together with their debut smash, “Down At Poppa Joe’s”) 
and the album will rapidly become a chart item if early deejay acceptance is 
any indication. Another couple of LP goodies that have Hal Ross on the move 
over at London these days include: “Drag City” by Jan and Dean and “In 
Space,” featuring the great swinging sounds of The Ventures. Hal indicates 
that he welcomes the opportunity to cooperate with the country’s spinners 
where contests on the aforementioned product are concerned. The hottest single 
in some time around the London H.Q. is the newie by Kathy Kirby, who Hal 
describes as follows: “. . . a beautiful girl who looks as good as Jane Mansfield 
and she lives in England and she can sing too!!” I’ll have to say amen to at 
least the last claim. Her good reading of “Secret Love” should go a long way 
to making the song a hit all over again. According to Hal, the side is the num- 
ber five song in England, and it’s beginning to show hit signs in this country, 
with heavy air play at such widely separated spots as C-FUN in Vancouver, 
and CKGM, Montreal. 

Incidently, CKGM’s loss will be CJAD’s gain, in so far as the services of one 
beautiful record library employee are concerned. Ex-Winnipegger, Sally Dales 
moves from the one Montreal outlet to the other. 

A record originating with Arthur Godfrey’s Contempo Label in the U.S. is 
creating quite a stir in the Nation’s Capital of late. “In The Image Of God” is 



AUSTRALIA 


It was indeed a pleasure to meet two such nice people as Nina and Frederik 
at a recent reception to welcome them to Australia. In honor of their visit, 
EMI made a big promotion drive on the records it has available by this 
talented pair. 

Many records are out now in tribute to the late John Fitzgerald Kennedy. 
Of them all it seems that the one being best received in this country is 
the Festival label release of the tribute from the BBC in the series “That 
Was The Week That Was.” 

The De Kroo Brothers are out with a great single follow-up on the Festival 
label to their fine hit “Scarlet.” The top side of the newie is “Foggy Moun- 
tain Top” which is on the hootenanny kick — it should do well for the boys. 

With the hot-rod business starting to create some interest in Australia, 
ARC has moved quickly into the field by releasing their CBS disk of The 
Rip Chords with “Hev Little Cobra.” Another CBS single doing great busi- 
ness is the Andy Williams cut of “A Fool Never Learns” which according 
to ARC’S general sales manager, Ray Bull, has “taken off like a rocket in 
all States.” 

Marty Robbins is scheduled to arrive in Australia on February 18 and will 
have about a week in this country before moving out on a tour to New Zea- 
land. During his stay here Marty will cut segments for several television 
shows and will also do some concerts supported by top Austi’alian C&W acts. 

Recording activity of local artists has understandably been fairly quiet 
over the recent holiday season but action will soon start again. 1963 was 
a reasonably good year for local talent but certainly not the best year we’ve 
seen. Many local discs were produced last year but not a great number of 
national hits resulted — although there were many, many regional hits. All 
things being equal 1964 should be a bonanza year for the local product . . . 
it is a year that could see several of our leading stars step out on overseas 
visits. 

One of the most played records on Australian radio right now is “Glad 
All Over” by The Dave Clark Five from England. It is high on our best- 
seller list and looks like a real smash for EMI on Columbia. 

If some of the hot English acts could tour Australia right now they would 
make a fortune. Whether or not the enthusiasm can be held to its present 
high standard until some of the big groups visi,t us within the next few 
months remains to be seen. Trends come and go so quickly in this business 
that there is some risk in booking an act a long way ahead. The way things 
stand at this moment the “Liverpool Sound” is the hottest thing since Presley 
and for the sake of the promoters we hope it stays that way for the next 
few months. 

For the first time since this column has been appearing, we find the same 
artists with the top three records across the nation to their credit. You won’t 
need to be told that the artists are The Beatles and their three top hits in 
order are “I Want To Hold Your Hand”; “I Saw Her Standing There” and 
“She Loves You.” 

Ron Gillespie — head of W & G Records — reports great action on two new 
locally produced records of overseas hits. Kevin Shegog already has his version 
of “Saginaw, Michigan” making good headway and Adrian L’ssher — who 
scored heavily a while back with “Talk Back Trembling Lips” — again looks 
set for the top with his latest effort “A Week In The Country.” 

Graham Webb, one of the personalities with Station 2GB (Sydney) has 
been given his own disk-jockey show again after many months of doing the 
bi’eakfast session and mid-morning programs. Graham’s new program will 
be heard five nights each week and on Sunday; his program “helper” will 
be Joy Parr from the 2GB record library. 

Australia's Best Sellers 


1 I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles — Parlophone) Leeds Music 

2 I Saw Her Standing There (The Beatles — Parlophone) Leeds Music 

3 She Loves You (The Beatles — Parlophone) Leeds Music 

4 Glad All Over (Dave Clark Five — Columbia) Reg Connelly Music 

5 Do You Love Me (Brian Poole — Decca) Dominion Music 

6 Please (Frank Ifield — Columbia) Chappell & Co. 

7 As Usual (Brenda Lee — Festival) 

8 Memphis Tennessee (Dave Barry — Decca) Jewel Music 

9 Secret Love (Kathy Kirby — Decca) Allans Music 
10 Pretty Paper (Roy Orbison — London) Acuff-Rose 


CANADA (Cont’d) 

the side, cut by one Billy DuPree. The artist was a member of the famed “Sing- 
ing Sergeants” of the U.S. Air Force Band, and as such made frequent appear- 
ances over the last few years at the Central Canada Exhibition in Ottawa. Now 
that he is no longer in the U.S.A.F., the young singer is making a career for 
himself in show biz. He has been appearing for the last little while with Arthur 
Godfrey on his various radio and TV shows. The record is being distributed in 
Canada by the Compo Company. Anyone wishing a copy of the disk and/or 
more information concerning this fine new artist should contact Marlyne Fee- 
ney, 107 Stanley Ave., Ottawa 2, Ont. 

Record man Walt Grealis, manager of Shirley Matthews, is about to debut a 
new company intended to function as an independent promotion, personal man- 
agement, P.R. etc., under the heading of “Walt Grealis’ Images.” Already con- 
nected with Grealis in a management capacity is Miss Matthews, whose inter- 
national success with “Big Town Boy” is in no small way due to the efforts of 
Grealis; Hamilton deejay, Dave Mickie, about to make his debut as a recording 
star; Bobby Dow, who enjoyed considerable success in several areas with recent 
RCA Victor singles; and WKBW, Buffalo spinner, Joey Reynolds. By the way, 
Bobby Dow will now be recording for the Tamarac label in Canada with H.Q. 
in Toronto. Walt indicates that two Canadian songs will shortly be released in 
the U.S. on 20th Century Fox by newcomer Jayson King. (Canadian release will 
follow shortly on Tamarac. 

We’ve been keeping you informed on the progress of the new folk-tvpe al- 
bum by Jullianne Harris. I feel that a word about the physical characteristics 
of the new femme singer would now be in order. She’s five foot one, a brunette, 
and she’s beautiful. Moreover she sings up a storm, as you will soon be able to 
hear for yourself. About those characteristics, I am in a' position to verify them 
as I’m one of the few tradesters to have met the mysterious Miss Harris. 

Dave Palmer, spinner at Saskatoon’s CKOM, has* good words for a new re- 
lease by Barry Ennis. It’s on Barry in Canada, Crescent in the U.S. "Mountain 
Of Ice” is the top side and there’s action a plenty on it all across the Canadian 
west. Another item that broke first in the western provinces, Loreen Church’s 
“That’s What You Do”/“I Want To Stand Up On The Mountain,” is being re- 
serviced by Quality to all Canadian deejays. It was a slow starter but now it’s 
really beginning to happen Canada-wide. 


58 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964- 


Internationcl Section 


During January, Spanish TV and Radio gave the first Gold Record Disco 
de oror (this is the name of the award, but doesn’t mean that those records 
sold more than a million, of course)! There were only two: one for the best 
foreign record, given to “Dame Felicidad” (“Free Me”) by Mexican Enrique 
Guzman ((IBS), and the other for the best Spanish record, given to “La Hora” 
(by Portoles and Selles, both composers of hits, and also winner of Benidorm 
Festival) sung by Tito Mora on RCA Victor. These two records were chosen 
through the radio program, “Hit Parade Nacional,” done by Mariano Mendez 
Vigo in Radio Nacional de Espana (State 0 & O Station). 

January is also in Spain the month for “popularity polls.” The magazine 
about records “Discobolo” published recently the results of 1963 popularity 
poll, as follows: 

Best male foreign singers: Elvis Presley, Paul Anka, Cliff Richard, Johnny 
Hallyday, Ray Charles, E. Guzman. 

Best male Spanish singers: Jose Guardiola, Tito Mora, Raphael, Mike Rios, 
Michel. 

Best female foreign singers: Francois Hardy, Connie Francis, Petula Clark, 
Dalida, Brenda Lee. 

Best female Spanish singers: Gelu, Rosalia, Lita Torello, Rocio Durcal, Sa- 
lome. 

Best foreign vocal group: Los T.N.T., The Platters, Los 5 Latinos, The Broth- 
ers Four, The Everly Brothers. 

Best Spanish vocal group: Duo Dinamico, Duo Rubam, Duo Juvent’s, Los 3 
Carino, Los H. H., Albert & Richard. 

Best foreign instrumental group: The Shadows, The Spotnicks, Ray Conniff, 
Los Teen Tops, The Tornados. 

Best Spanish inst. group: Los Relampagos, Los Sonor, Orq. Maravella, Rudy 
Ventura, Los Pajaros Locos. 

Best Spanish Songs: “La Hora,” “Carihosa,” “Perdoname,” Enseha Tus Ma- 
nos” “Que Tengas Suerte” 

Best Foreign Songs: “Dame Felicidad” (“Free Me”), “Chariot,” “Tous Les 
Gracons Et Les Filles,” “Maria,” “Dile” (“Tell Him”). 

A very important fact now in the Spanish Record industry is that musi- 
cians do not want to play on recordings at their present wage scale. Record 
companies think that the figures asked by the musicians are much too high. 
The quarrel is now in a deadlock and the record companies are recording the 
local versions with play-backs of the background that come from other coun- 
tries. 

Some lucky Spanish artists are getting a real success out of Spain. Albert & 
Richard, Spanish RCA Victor discovery, are now recording their own songs in 
England, where they call themselves Alberto and Ricardo. Rocio Durcal 
(Philips), also a film actress, has received good news from Mexico. 

Fran?oise Hardy, top French female singer, has come to Spain for night- 
clubs and TV appearances. Dion (Mr. Ruby Baby) was also here, but only for 
TV. Also visits paid by Kenny Drew to a jazz club in Barcelona and by 
Frankie Avalon to TV and night club. 

Probably Tito Mora (RCA Victor) and Gelu (EMI) will record together, 
singing some hits in duo. Both companies have reached an agreement. Differ- 
ent titles will be released on both labels. Representative of German Interna- 
tional label, Hans Schemke, is here dealing with some companies the right to 
release here Peppino Di Capri and Elke Sommer productions (and more from 
International). Hispavox and RCA seems to be the most approximated to the 
contract. 

First Dynagroove releases include Peter Nero and Duane Eddy stereo L.P. 
Mono Dynagroove will be released in March. Belter has released April Atevens 
& Nino Tempo’s “Deep Purple,” Ben E. King “I (Who Have Nothing)” and 
Barbara Lewis’ “Hello Stranger” . . . Zafiro issued an L.P. by Marisol, charm- 
ing top singer and actress. . . . CBS presented an L.P. of Frank Sinatra. . . . 
Discophon released a big collection of Negro Spirituals (12 volumes E.P.), 
that reached high sales during Christmas. . . . Probably Frank Sinatra Jr. 
will sing in Madrid in February. 

The Blue Diamonds and Francoise Hardy will record in the near future in 
Spanish. Dutch duo recorded oldie “Maria Dolores” and Spanish version of 
“Sukiyaki.” This is a very important matter to be known by companies with 
representatives here: international artists must record in Spanish if they 
want to have success here and in Spanish speaking American countries. 

“Gran Parada,” first Spanish TV show, presented recently ten songs from 
which listeners will pick the one to represent Spain in Eurovision Song Con- 
test. The results are not yet known. 


Cdsh Box 



MEXICO 


Here from Spain is Esteban Garcia Morencos, general manager from Zafiro 
Records and Luis Ferrer, A&R of the same company, to sign a contract of 
representation with Orfeon. With the same motive from Caracas, Venezuela 
is Jose Antor and Mr. Valle, both of them executives from Antor Records. 
So, from now on, Orfeon Records will be represented in Spain and in Venezuela 
by the aforementioned, who will stay in this city until they check the Orfeon 
catalog and choose the best material to take back to their countries. 

Angelica Maria, currently number one vocalist in Mexico, is finishing her 
34th picture. This young singer, who is 19 years-old, began to perform in 
pictures at the age of 6. Her latest recording at Musart Records are 
“Dominique” and “No Te Puedo Abrazar.” Angelica will perform for the 
first time in New York at the theater “Puerto Rico.” Later, she wants to 
do a musical show in a Mexican night club and in a few more months will 
fly to Spain, where her records are getting very popular. 

Gamma Records will release the latest recordings made in Spain by Span- 
ish vocalist Marisol. Her latest picture will be released very soon in the 
Mexican capital. 

Finally, RCA released the long play recorded in Mexico City with Neil 
Sedaka. Songs like “Bad Girl,” “Waiting For Never,” “Must Be Dreaming,” 
“The Dreamer,” “Next Door To An Angel,” “Let’s Go Steady Again,” “Ti 
Quarteto Nel Cuore” and Mexican songs like “Maria Elena,” “El Reloj” and 
others. All of them were x'ecorded in Spanish by Neil with an American 
orchestra and a Mexican one, conducted by Chucho Zarzosa. 

CBS also released the newest Enrique Guzman long play, on which the 
popular young Mexican singer includes the songs “The Cry (Jf The Century,” 
“Mala Femena,” “The Love Of The Boy,” “I Will Follow Him,” “Uno Dei 
Tanti,” “Witchcraft,” “We’re Gonna Throw A Little Party,” “Betty In 
Bermudas,” “Teenage Philosopher,” “Maria” and “1999.” The backing is by 
Chuck Anderson and his orchestra and the rock and roll group Los Salvajes. 
Enrique will fly to Spain in May to make his first performance in Europe. 
He will receive a “gold record” for his popularity. 


O L L A N 

Bovema’s Stateside-label has rushed out four high flying Cash Box hits: 
Joey Powers’ “Midnight Mary,” The Murmaids’ “Popsickles and^ Icicles,” 
Dean and Jean’s “Tra La La La Suzy” and The Trashmen’s “Surfin’ Bird.” 

Cees Mentink, Gramophonehouse’s Imperial-chief, reports that both Imca 
Marina and Shirley are now regularly appearing on Dutch Radio and TV. 
Imca’s latest hit “Ueber Den Wolken 1st Sonnenschain” is selling very fast. 

Another Imperial-songstar, Rita Corita, recorded her “0, Wat Heb Ik Een 
Figuur” in Germany. Rita’s now a featured star in many regular TV-shows 
with slapstick-comedian Bueno de Mesquita. 

First results of Imperial “Tiener Top Test”-panel will be released shortly. 
Among them are “The Tragedy Of Kennedy” by The Southern Bell Singers 
and Freddie Cannon’s treatment of “Sweet Georgia Brown.” 

Bovema’s Columbia-department reports from Holland that first items by 
the Dave Clark Five have been received with growing enthusiasm. In a 
jazz vein, Herbie Ellis’ “Midnight RolT’-album is now getting raving reviews 
and radio plugging. 

Bovema’s Capitol-label now has another C&W-smash hit in the can: Buck 
Owens’ 12" album “Buck Owens Sings Tommy Collins” is being sold e:<tremely 
well these days. 

Hot entries on the local scene issued by Artone this month, include The 
(new) Selvera’s Dutch reading of the German Hit “Drei Musketiere” and 
trumpeter Willy Schobben’s new, up-dated version of his former world-wide 
success “Trumpet Tango.” The Selvera’s (Zus & Jenny) made their TV-debut 
last week. 

The ABC Paramount line, distributed by Artone, is scoring regularly in 
the Singles & Albums picture. “That Lucky Old Sun” by Ray Charles and 
“Who Cares” by Fats Domino both are doing great. New releases include: 
Tommy Roe’s “Clome On,” “What Kind Of Fool” by The Tams and “Happy 
Tears” by Paul Anka. ABC’s Jazz-line “Impulse” has meanwhile become a 
big Jazz-label on the market in this country, with packages by John Coltrane, 
Roland Kirk (“Out Of The Afternoon”) and Charles Mingus as top-scorers. 

Artone’s subsid Funckler Records also is hitting the market with material 
by Roland Kirk. To be i-eleased soon is Kirk’s very first LP recording he 
made with Ira Sullivan for the Argo label: “Introducing . . . Roland Kirk.” 
The multi-instrumentalist appeared in concert here recently and has proved 
a steady seller since. 

During his 4-day stay in Benelux, Trini Lopez will be presented with a 
Platina replica of the 250,000th copy of the “Hammer” etching sold in this 
territory. Event, being unique in that the Lopez lad probably will be the 
first American singer to receive such award, will take place during the half- 
hour VARA-telecast of a live performance at Amsterdam’s Bellevue Theatre. 
Pete Felleman, Reprise Exec for Benelux and manager of Artone’s subsid 
Funckler Records, will take care of the proceedings. 

Artone’s subsid Funckler Records reports lots of action on account of 
Roulette recording artists. The world-famous Barry Sisters are getting 
special attention in conjunction with their latest LP release “The Barry 
Sisters in Israel.” The late Dinah Washington has been the subject of many 
Radio and Press profiles on account of her tremendous “Dinah ’63” package, 
issued soon after her death. Hitting both the singles and LP markets, Ray 
Barretto Y Su Orquestra should interest Latin followers as well as Pop buyers. 

Holland's Best Sellers 


This Last 
Week Week 
1 1 

2 2 

3 4 

4 3 

5 5 

6 7 

7 6 

8 8 

9 9 

10 — 


Pour Moi La Vie Va Commencer (Johnny Hallyday/ Philips) 
(World Music/Brussels) 

Nimm Deine Weisse Gitarre (Gert Timmernian/Telefunken) (Les 
Ed. Int. Basart/ Amsterdam ) 

This Land Is Your Land (Trini Lopez; Reprise) (Les Ed. Int. 
Bassart/Amsterdam ) 

Spiegelbeeld/Tes Tendres Annees (Willeke Alberti/Philips, Johnny 
Hallyday/Philips) (Francobel/Brussels; sole agency: Editions Al- 
tona, Amsterdam) 

If I Had A Hammer/America (Trini Lopez/Reprise) (Les Ed. Int. 
Basart/ Amsterdam ) 

Dominique (The Singing Nun/Philips) (Editions Altona/ Amster- 
dam) 

Tous Les Garcons Et Les Filles (Frangoise Hardy/Vogue) (Les 
Ed. Int. Basart/Amsterdam ) 

Maria No Mas (Cliff Richard/Columbia) (Holland Music/Amster- 
dam) 

Maria Elena (Los Indios Tabarajas/RCA) (Holland Music/Am- 
sterdam ) 

I Want To Hold Your Hand (The Beatles/Parlophone) (Les Ed. 
Int. Basart/Amsterdam) 


Mexico's Best Sellers 

1 Dominique — Los Dominic (Orfeon) — Sor Sonrisa (Philips) — Angelica Ma- 
ria (Musart) — Queta Garay (Peerless) — Hermana Algeria (CBS) — Luis 
Perez Meza (Cisne) 

2 Si Supieras — Sonora Santanera (CBS) 

3 Magia Blanca — Hnos — Carrion (CBS) — Trio Venezuela (Velvet) (Grever) 

4 Quiero Quedarme Aqui (I Want To Stay Here) — Steve Lawrence — Eydie 
Gorme (CBS) — Los Dominic (Orfeon) (Brambila) 

5 El Martillito (If I Had A Hammer) — Trini Lopez (Reprise) — Los Mabers 
(Musart) 

6 Recuerdos De Ipaearai — Neil Sedaka (RCA) — Monna Bell (Gamma) 
(Fermata Mexicana) 

7 Enamorado — Los Yorsys (Musart) — Ray Barreto (Gamma) 

8 Gracias — Connie Francis (MGM) — Lucho Gatica (Musart) — Javier Solis 
(CBS) — Flor Silvestre (Musart) 

9 En La Revancha — Sonia Lopez (CBS) 

10 Despeinada — Los Hooligans (Ox-feon) — Manolo Muixoz (Musax-t) — Pablo 
Beltran Ruiz (RCA) — Los Xochimilcas (Peerless) — Kay Pex-ez (Orfeon) 
(Reimsa) 


MEXICO (Cont’d) 

From Musaxt Records, we x-eceived a single made by Alberto Vazquez, 
including the songs “Perdoname La Vida” composed by Gabriel Ruiz and 
“El Secreto,” the old standard recorded some years ago by Gordon McRae. 
Arrangements and ox'chestra are from Jorge Ortega. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


International Section 


59 




Consolette speakers are silent until 
activated by coins. 



All coins accepted are totalized on 
Seeburg’s built-in totalizer. 




Only these 2 remote speakers earn you money 


They play only for money. 
No coin, no music. 

That’s why Seeburg Stereo 
Consolettes step up gross 
income everywhere they’re 
installed. 


CONVENTIONAL remote speakers earn the 
operator no money. They entertain for free. 

But the two built-in stereo speakers in 
Seeburg’s remote Stereo Consolettes earn 
you plenty. It takes one or more deposited 
coins to activate the speakers in each indi- 
vidual unit. No coin, no music. 

That’s why this unique combined selec- 


tor/speakers unit always steps up gross 
phonograph income in LP Console loca- 
tions. The entire system works to produce 
income. 

Location patrons enjoy fingertip selec- 
tion right at their tables . . . plus intimate, 
personal stereo listening. 

You enjoy a bigger collection. 



EBURG 


MUSIC FOR PROFITABLE PUBLIC ENTERTAINMENT 


60 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


Box Eciitol'ial 


It's Time To Move 

The A.T.E. Convention Site 



Anytime a trade association can get 3000 trades- 
people into a meeting hall to view products exhibit- 
ed by sixty-eight firms displayed from more than 
one hundred stands, in the words of more than one 
promoter, they have a good thing going for them. 
But unless these V.I.P.’s are treated in a manner to 
which they have grown accustomed, they may very 
well leave future A.T.E. Conventions to more self- 
sacrificing colleagues and await reports of the show 
from the trade press. This is liable to happen unless 
the Convention Committee gets busy this moment 
and contracts for a more suitable site for what has 
grown to be the most successful coin machine con- 
vention in the world. 


An observer noted that on noon of opening day, 
with no more than 1200 people on the floor, the 
turnstiles had already jammed, viewers were bob- 
bing heads to get a look at displays, and each of the 
four main arteries which are used to increase the 
rate of traffic flow, were literally clogged with buy- 
ers clutching, so to speak, hard earned money ear- 
marked for the purchase of equipment. After all, 
that’s why people go to a Convention. And with this 
in mind, they must be treated as royalty. 


Here in the U.S.A. we would love to see our MO A 
Convention halls jammed, comes next October. 
There is every indication that with continued hard 
work on the part of our highly qualified Committee, 
this may be the case. But MOA has seen the days 
when the Convention hall echoed with resounding 
confirmation that perhaps the show had been held 
last week. Exhibitors spoke with one another to sus- 
tain themselves. It is a harrowing experience. Hence 
the new look at MOA and the spirit of determina- 
tion that will most certainly result in successful Con- 
ventions of the future. 


But we must overstep our bounds, if that is what 
we are doing, and warn A.T.E. and our British 
friends of the impending peril that could come 
about as a result of the extremely poor conditions 
under which thousands of visitors must participate 
in the annual trade show. Do not chase them away. 
Cater to them, each and every one, for they are not 
unlike the thousands of nerve centers which to- 
gether, put fife in a most important part of the coin 
machine industry in the United Kingdom. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


61 



3000 SHA TTER A TTENDANCE 
COIN EXECS ARRIVE EROM 


Termed An 
Unqualified Success 

LONDON — The 20th Annual Amuse- 
ment Trades Exhibition which took 
place in London last week must ro 
down on record as an unqualified 
success. By the time the doors opened 
at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, January 
28th the usually bleak and cold 
Royal Horticultural Hall, Westmin- 
ster, had been turned into a merry- 
Ro-round of fruit machines, phono- 
Rraphs, Rames, arcade equipment, kid- 
die rides and swaR. The transforma- 
tion was achieved after a weekend 
of tension on the part of the orRani- 
sers, work-RanRS, electricians and, 
last but not least, the exhibitors them- 
selves, all of whom normally have 
access to the hall three days before 
the show opens. This year, however, 
with equipment from a previous ex- 
hibition still beinR removed on Sun- 
day morninR, it was touch and ro 
whether the A.T.E. stands could pos- 
sibly be erected and the pile up of 
equipment sited by zero hour. Miracu- 
lously after forty-eiRht hours of fe- 
verish activity the big show of 1964 
Rot off to a tremendous start. 

Several factors were immediately 
apparent. Firstly, that the elabo- 
rately, competitive stands of the ma- 
jor distributors were of a remarkably 
hiRh standard. Particularly strikinR 
and, at the same time, desiRned with 
impeccably Rood taste were the stands 
of Ditchburn Equipment Ltd., Mar- 
Matic Sales Ltd., Phonographic Equip- 


ment Ltd., and Ruffler & Walker Ltd. 
Secondly, it was evident after only a 
few hours that all the previous at- 
tendance figures were being well and 
truly broken. Thirdly, more V.I.P.’s 
from America and the Continent flew 
in for the occasion than ever before — ■ 
proof of the growing importance of 
the Exhibition. The list of overseas 
visitors and friends both old and 
new who visited the Cash Box stand 
during the three-day event read like 
a veritable Who’s Who of top brass 
in the coin machine industry through- 
out the world. All the major manu- 
facturers from the United States 
seemed to be represented together 
with their major European importers 
and distributors. 

Last, and perhaps most important 
of all, it is necessary to report that 
the 1964 A.T.E. has proved, without 
doubt, that the present venue is no 
longer adequate in any way to house 
this annually expanding event. By 
noon on the first day when some 1,250 
visitors had passed through the turn- 
stiles, the four main arteries of the 
display area were completely blocked. 
As the hours wore on and the hall 
became more and more congested it 
was increasingly difficult to view with 
any degree of comfort and complaints 
about the inadequacy of the hall were 
being voiced on all sides, as visitors 
battled their way from stand to stand. 
Under conditions such as these, ex- 
hibitions, notoriously tiring at the 
best of times, become intolerable, de- 
feating their own ends which must 


surely be to show and sell to the best 
possible advantage, under the best 
possible conditions. 

Change In Halls 
Now A Necessity 

The present venue no longer full- 
fills either of these obligations. As 
we have already stated the orga- 
nisers, conscious of these defects, are 
making every effort to find a suitable 
alternative. Not only must the exhi- 
bition area itself be appreciably 
larger but the ideal location should 
also incorporate spacious lounges, 
restaurants and bars away from the 
bustle and noise of the main hall. 
These are vitally important neces- 
sities if the exhibitor is to achieve 
maximum results from his efforts. 
However, effective the stand or show- 
case may be in attracting the cus- 
tomer the sale may often be clinched 
away from the floor in surroundings 
more conducive to amiable discussions. 

The promise of new equipment in 
all categories was amply fulfilled and 
many machines by the world’s leading 
manufacturers were seen in London 
for the first time. Once again multi- 
slots were prominent both in size and 
numbers. One of the largest of these, 
the Florida Surf Race, was to be 
found immediately on entering the 
hall on the stand of Mayfield Auto- 
matics Ltd. A 24-player, Id play, 120- 
slot machine measuring 10-ft. across 
and surmounted by a vast perspex 


dome under which five coloured boats 
race round a real waterway surround- 
ing a central island. The winning 
colours pay out 2-12. Also on the 
Mayfield stand could be seen two 20- 
player 100-slot, Id play machines 
“Greyhound Derby’’ and “Colour Rou- 
lette.” Similar multi-slots were to be 
found on the stands of Vale Amuse- 
ment Supplies who had an attractive 
8-player, Blackjack, with flashing 
playing card motif with payouts 
from 2-12. Multi-slots were also 
shown by Alfred Crompton, Crompton 
and Bates, Millers Multi-slots and 
Leeday Photomatics. Kraft’s Auto- 
matics once again displayed a wide 
range of their own designed and 
manufactured machines including the 
popular Id play, 6-player, 30 slot 
“Auto Fruit” with flashing fruit sym- 
bols and the 3d play “Lucky Throw.” 
Both console models. 

Phonos A Major 
Attraction This Year 

Phonographs, this year, proved a 
major attraction with several new 
boxes making an impressive debut. 
In this field tremendous interest cen- 
tered around the A.M.I. stand and the 
brand new prototype “Electronic” 
160-selection small juke box manufac- 
tured by the German subsidiary of 
The Automatic Canteen Co. of Amer- 
ica and specially flown in for the 
A.T.E. The machine, currently on the 



Panoramic Photo Of New Royal Horticultural Hall Taken By Cash Box During 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


62 




RECORD A T LONDON’S A. T.E. 
EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA, US. 


factory floor, will be fully available 
in about six weeks. Major features of 
the box are utter simplicity, inter- 
changeability of components and 
speed of selection. The “Electronic” 
160 has a remarkably high tonal 
quality in relation to its size. The 
title panel at the top of the machine 
incorporates two notable features — 
an electronic number indicator which 
registers the selected disk and six I 
illuminated spots which in turn in- 
dicate the credit established. Also on 
show the new AMI Tropicana 200 
selection, flrst introduced just before 
Christmas. 


New Models On Hand 
From Other Nations 

Ditchburn Equipment Ltd. making 
a welcome return to the A. T.E. gave 
pride of place to the new Wurlitzer 
2800. Unique feature of this machine 
is the Golden Bar Seven Top Tune 
Selector for either the Top Seven 
singles or Little L.P.’s. The W 2800 
is housed in a completely new style 
cabinet. The redesigned Lyric 100 was 
also on show on the Ditchburn stand. 

Rock-Ola phonographs enjoyed 
maximum exposure on the stand of 
their importers and distributors, 
Ruffler and Walker. The spotlight 
here was on the brand new 418 SA, 
playing Little L.P.’s with intermix 
for 331<jrd and 45 r.p.m. and fitted 
with an income totalise!’. The Rock- 


Ola range also included the Rhap- 
sody 160 selection and the Capri 100 
plus the 1404 wall phonograph. 

Slots Offer New 
Payout Features 

Symplay Ltd., the United Kingdom 
distributors for Th. Bergmann & Co. 
of Hamburg, showed the full range 
of phonographs including the Sym- 
phonie 100 series. The Surfari Gun, 
the smallest mirror gun in production, 
proved to be a quick fire seller. An- 
other phonograph to draw the crowds 
was the Swiss designed, french manu- 
factured, Jupiter 96 and 120 shown 
o:i the elaborate stand of Phono- 
graphic Equipment Co. Ltd. who re- 
ported heavy sales. However, Phono- 
graphic gave their greatest space to 
fruit machines with the new Bally 
fruit well to the fore. Mr. Bill O’Don- 
nell, President of the Bally Manu- 
facturing Co. came over speciafiy to 
launch it on the British market. The 
machine has an electrical pay-out 
popper replacing the customary coin 
tube and the old pay-out slide system 
which can be adjusted to suit pay- 
out requirements on the various jack- 
pots. Another innovation is the sub- 
stitution of the escalator by a na- 
tional bent coin rejector. Phono- 
graphic also displayed an impressive 

, array of Sega machines including the 
new Lord Sega. 

I Nearby on another impressive 


stand Mar-Matic Sales Ltd. featured 
the new Jennings 6d play Pearly 
King and Pearly Queen machines 
with novelty, charity, heart award, 
the idea being for the lucky player to 
donate the free pay-out, which is 
on the centre reel only, to charity. 
The machine has two jackpots. An- 
other two-jackpot 6d play on show 
for the first time was the Jennings 
8-ball with the added feature of giv- 
ing a free pull on every 13th play. 
Mar-Matic Sales Ltd. enjoyed one of 
the sensations of the show with Jen- 
nings new British Challenger with 
electric pay-out and jackpot of 230 
coins won on a mystery combination. 
The Challenger fid play is contained 
in a pedestal which also houses an 
electrical pay-out mechanism and is 
finished with a high quality chrome 
surround together with the well 
known Jennings “winning head” 
symbol. Mar-Matics also featured the 
new Keeney fid play electric Pony 
Derby and Twin Dragon consoles. 

Australia Well 
Represented At Show 

Ainsworth Consolidated (Great 
Britain) Ltd. reported excellent sales 
for their new Nevada Gold Star mak- 
ing its fii'st London appearance along- 
side the proven range of Aristocrat 
machines. Another Australian firm, 
Jubilee Products Ltd. were showing 
their new 3d and fid Jubilee Interna- 


tional. Available for world distribu- 
tion in any size foreign currency de- 
sired, visitors from overseas, were 
placing orders briskly. An old estab- 
lished exhibitor at the A. T.E. Philip 
Shefras had a winner with his show- 
stopping “Lucky Clown,” an attract- 
ively designed glass fronted cabinet 
featuring a mammoth clown with 
perpetually rolling head and eyes. 
Ping pong balls ejected from his 
large red mouth fall into receptacles 
with pay-outs of fid and 1/-. Player 
appeal is added by the pay-out de- 
vice which sends the winning coins 
clattering down from an eye level 
slot into thigh level trays. 'The two 
machines on show were sold within 
an hour of the exhibition opening. 

On the dais at the end of the hall 
the only foreign exhibitor Automaten- 
Bau Forster of Germany featured 
their soccer and ice hockey games on 
a stand which was situated alongside 
Edwin Hall whose wide range of 
kiddie rides once again proved him 
a leader in this particular field. Next 
door, Peter Simper, main distributor 
for Keeney and Jennings reported 
that hard sales from the stand itself 
bad far exceeded his expectations. 
Also on the dais was the Glenvill 
Press and Coin Automatics stand, 
printing specialists for fruit, tote and 
golf bands. Tbe company also dis- 
nlayed a bank of Jennings fid play 
Riverside fruit machines. 

Although exact figures are not yet 
available it is estimated that during 

(Continued on page 65) 





1C sumiH t 7 

ft,* 


20th Annual A.T.E. Show. 3000 Visitors Were Recorded During 3-Day Exhibition. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


63 






A. T.E. 

Photo 

Review 



Records London's Biggest- Show 



Left, John Coley (Sale Mgr), Geoff Muir (Genl 
Mgr) and Geo. Bain (Ainsworth distributor) on the 
Ainsworth stand. 


Pictured with Ditchburn’ s “Wurlitzer Music Maker’’ 
Mr. Town (Ditchburn Sales Mgr), Mr. Cova of 
Lombardi, Italy; Mr. Berti, N ovamatic, Milan; and 
John Mauther, an interpreter. 



Seeburg International’ s George Gilbert, VP, on the 
Gainsmead Group’s stand featuring the LP Console. 


Maury Sykes, Mar-Matoc head, with Mar-Matic 
Ltd’s Geoffrey Grane, with the new Jennings “Brit- 
ish Challenger”. 


Joe Phillips {left) with Hal Eldridge of Halel Enter- 
terprises Ltd. with Mr. Top Gun of the HaleU 
Major-Matics stand. 



Mondial Commercial’ s Richard Sarkisian, Mr. Stcok- 
dale, a Rock-Ola distributor, Alfred W. Adickes, 
head of Nova Apparate, and Neville Marten, Euro- 
pean Director of Cash Box, Nova’s Mr, Barrasch, 
and Mr. Valentina, a Nova representative. 



The only foreign exhibitor at the A.T.E., Mr. 
Forster of Automaten-Bau, Germany, with one of 
his own soccer games, as he explained it to Neville 
Marten. 






Picture taken on the Jubilee stand shows John 
Muddle (right), Director of company, who came in 
from Australia especially for the A.T.E. show. Left, 
Mr. Harold Smith, Genl Mgr of the firm. 



Sandwich girls, promote J. B. Marketing, UK firm J. Lennard, Genl Mgr of Glenvil Press and Coin Philip Shefras (left) Philip Shefras Sales Ltd., 
specializing in juke box commercials. Demo tapes Autos, with his line-up of Jennings fruit machines, pictured demonstrating his new rifle range to 
were on machines at show. visitors. 


64 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 





Lars K. Skriver, Hamburg arcade owner, German 
import-export exec Oskar Adam, Mr. Glawe and 
Mr. Egon Schopp of Th. Bergmann & Co., visiting 
the Symplay stand. 



Mr. Guppy, an Andover operator, with Martin 
Bromley, of Sega. 



Thomas Murphy MBE (former Sec. of Showman’s 
Guild of GB) with John Singleton, Sec.-Genl. Mgr. 
of A.T.E. 



Fed and Gordon Walker with their own “Little 
Duke" fruit machine. 


3000 Break 
A.T.E. Record 

(Continued from page 63) 
the three day event more than 3,000 
visitors toured the exhibition hall. It 
is certain that the 1964 show has 
broken all existing records both for 
attendance and volume of business 
transacted. As already stated more 
overseas visitors than ever made the 
journey to London from countries all 
over the world including America, 
Japan, Australia, France, Holland, 
Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, 
Italy, Sweden, Denmark, Rhodesia 
and Greece. The following list of 
visiting executives is not complete but 
will serve to reflect the calibre of 
business people in attendance at 
A.T.E.: 

UNITED STATES: Mr. Joe Bar- 
ranco (President Mar-Matic Sales) ; 
Mr. Buckley (Buckley Manufacturing 
Co. of Chicago) ; Mr. Bromley 
(Sega); Mr. Bill O’Donnell (Presi- 
dent, Bally Manufacturing Co.) ; Mr. 
Richard Sarkisian (Executive of the 
Mondial Corporation) ; Mr. Sam 
Stern (Williams) ; Mr. Maurice 
Sykes (Managing Director Mar- 
Matic Sales); Mr. J. A. Weinand 
(President, J. H. Keeney & Co. Inc.). 

CANADA: Mr. Jean Coutu of 
Laniel Amusement Inc. 

GERMANY: Mr. A. W. Adickes 
(European Distributor for Rock- 
01a) ; Mr. Beerwinkel (Deutsche 
Wurlitzer) ; Mr. Borrasch (Rock- 
01a) ;Mr. Von Darladen (Deutsche 
Wurlitzer) ; Mr. Derigs (Baden Auto- 
maten — Cologne); Mr. Forster (Auto- 
maten-Bau) ; Mr. Glane of Hamburg; 
Mr. Oskar Adam importer and Dis- 
tributor — Lahn) ; Mr. Nack (Lowen 
Automaton — Bingen/Rhein) ; Mr. 
Mosinger (Lowen Automaton — Bin- 
gen/Rhein) ; Mr. Redlich (Lowen 
Automaton — Bingen/Rhein) ; Mr. Ken 
Roberson of Frankfurt; Mr. Lars K. 
Skriver (Arcade owner — Hamburg) ; 
Mr. Erich Schneider of Hamburg: 
Mr. Egon Schopp (Th. Bergmann) ; 
Mr. Schmidt (Frankenautomaten — 
Munich) ; Mr. Seppell (Frankenauto- 
maten — Munich) ; Mr. Valentin 
(Chief Eneineer, Nova Aparate). 

FRANCE : Mr. Paricat from Paris; 
Mr. Zaoui of Sirico, Paris. 

ITALY: Mr. Cova (Novamatic of 
Milan) ; Mr. Berti (Novamatic of 
Milan); Mr. Mauro (Milan). 

HOLLAND : Mr. F. H. Loontjens 
(Amsterdam) . 

GREECE : Mr. F. Enitropoulos. 

RHODESIA: Mr. W. Chapman of 
Salisburv. 

AUSTRALIA: Mr. John Muddle 
(Jubilee Products). 

SWEDEN : Mr. C. Danneman 
(Gotlieb & Seeburg Distributor in 
Stockholm) ; Mr. R. Gyllenpalm (AB 
Big Bronco, Stockholm) ; Mr. Silt- 
berg; Mr. Curt Svensson (Abata 
Handels AB). 

DENMARK : Mr. Jorgen Sandager 
(Tilst) ; Mr. Laustsen (Tilst) ; Mr. 
E. Jensen; Mr. E. Jorgenson (Eg- 
holm Automat). 

SWITZERLAND: Mr. Scheidegger 
(Wurlitzer Overseas Manager). 

The Biggest 
Jennings Distrib 
in The Worid 

LONDON — A major social event of 
the A.T.E. week was the magnificent 
cocktail party hosted by Mar-Matic 
Sales Ltd. in the penthouse suite of 
the Carlton Tower Hotel. 180 guests 
thronged the lavishly decorated suite 
with its panoramic views of London 
town. Highlight of the evening was 
the presentation made by Mr. Maurice 
Sykes, Managing Director of Mar- 
Matic Sales, of an inscribed silver 
salver to Mr. George Coughtrey of 
Coventry in recognition of his be- 
coming the biggest Jennings distrib- 
utor of fruit machines in the world. 
Coughtrey, a veteran of 36 years in 
the coin machine business was warm- 
ly applauded for his magnificent 
achievement. 


Lee>K 


TO 

R OS i H 

i illii i iiM iH 

■liiliiliS 



ALL MACHINES LIKE NEW 
GUARANTEED CLEAN & CHECKED 
★ Ready To Go ★ 


• 

PIN GAMES 

WILLIAMS 

Each 

1 

Add A Boll 

$175.00 

2 

Big Deal 

Bobo 

325.00 

2 

135.00 

3 

Coquette 

275.00 

4 

Coravelle 

225.00 

1 

Casino 

60.00 

3 

Cross Word 

85.00 

3 

Fiesta 

160.00 

3 

Four Roses 

250.00 

1 

Golden Bells 

100.00 

1 

Golden Gloves 

1 1 5.00 

4 

Highways 

135.00 

4 

Hollywood 

225.00 

1 

Kisihet 

325.00 

2 

Magic Clocks 

200.00 

3 

Music Man 

215.00 

1 

Rocket 

75.00 

1 

Reserve 

225.00 

2 

Space Ship 

200.00 

2 

Sea Wolf 

95.00 

4 

Serenade 

165.00 

S 

3 Coins 

235.00 

5 

Ten Spots 

200.00 

3 

21 

125.00 

250.00 

3 

Tradewinds 

2 

Viking 

200.00 

5 

Jungle 

150.00 

• 

1 

GOTTLIEB 

Around the World . . . 

$175.00 

2 

Atlas 

175.00 

1 

Continental Cafe . . . 

75.00 

3 

Criss Cross 

135.00 

1 

Flipper Parade 

225.00 

2 

Lite A Card 

165.00 

1 

Mamselle 

150.00 

3 

Queen Diamonds 

150.00 

2 

Race Time 

165.00 

1 

Seven Seas .... 

175.00 

2 

Spot A Cord 

160.00 

2 

Texans 

250.00 

2 

Universe 

135.00 

2 

World Beautv 

1 50.00 

1 

Flying Circus 

275.00 

4 

Miss Annabelle . 

140.00 

• 

4 

MIDWAY 

Carnival 

$375.00 

3 

Target Gallery 

200.00 

• 

1 

CHICAGO COIN 

Big Hit 

300.000 



★ 

BASEBALL 

GAMES 

★ 


Each 

2 Big Daddy (Williams) .. $395.00 

4 All-Star Baseball (Chi Coin) 375.00 

2 4-Baggers (Williams) 75.00 

2 DeLoxe Baseball— 1957 (Williams) 125.00 

1 Short Stop (Williams) 150.00 

6 Major League — '63 (Williams) 375.00 

5 Midway Slugger (Midway) 350.00 


All Prices Quoted Crated F.O.B. Philo. 


World's Largest 
Inventory 

• 

Send for 
Complete Lists 


ARCADE 

GAMES 

VENDING 

MUSIC 

RIDES 


WIRE - PHONE - WRITE TODAY 



Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


65 





Gash Box 

VENDING NEWS 

The Vending Machine Industry's Only Newsweekly 


Attack On Cigaret Vendors 
Continues; Op Alert Meets Begin 



] HOT COFFEE COMING UP! Vending machine of ARA Service is placed 
under aerial tram car at Cannon Mountain in New Hampshire for ride up 
4,200 foot ski slope to join seven others in refreshment area at the summit. 
Company officials said it was the first time this method of transportation has 
ever been used for vending machines. 


NEW YORK — As was expected, the 
attack on cigarette vending machines 
is moving at a rapid rate following 
the US Surgeon General’s Report. 
NAMA’s Operation Alert program — 
the third series of its kind — got 
underway Wed., Feb. 5 in Olympia, 
Washington and will move to cover 
fifteen cities in less than 15 days. 

The Wall Street Journal published 
a story last week summarizing the 
vending machine attack with i-efer- 
ences to various legislative actions 
currently being activated. A group in 
L.A. called ACTION (Alliance Com- 
batting Tobacco Infection Of Non- 


Bradley Elected Pres. 
Okla. Auto. Council 

CHICAGO — January 30 — Monty Brad- 
ley, Interstate Vending Company, 
Oklahoma City, Okla., has been 
elected president of the Oklahoma 
Automatic Merchandising Council 
(OAMC), reports Gilbert H. Tansey, 
NAM A state council secretary. 

Bradley was named to head the 
Oklahoma vending group at a council 
meeting, January 16. He succeeds Al- 
bert G. Nechanicky, Canteen Service 
Company, Oklahoma City. 

Other newly-elected officers are 
Woodrow Maupin, Enid Vending Co., 
Enid — vice president, and Bert C. 
Strong, Oklahoma Vending Co., Okla- 
homa City — treasurer. Harry 
Schwartz, Canteen Service Co., Okla- 
homa City, was appointed recording 
secretary. 

Some 34 persons attended the meet- 
ing, Tansey said. 

OAMC is one of 10 state vending 
associations affiliated with NAMA. 


Knights Of Malta 



Patrick L. O’Malley (center), presi- 
dent of Automatic Canteen Co. of 
America, receives a silver tray com- 
memorating his installation as a 
Knight of Malta, the highest Papal 
order a Roman Catholic layman can 
receive. The tray was given by the 
directors of The Exchange National 
Bank of Chicago. Presenting the tray 
are Edgar Heymann (left), Exchange 
National president, and George D. I 
Sax, board chairman of the bank, j 
O’Malley is a director of Exchange i 
National. 1 


Adults,) claiming 60 members, wants 
to close off vendors in the City. Chair- 
man Kenneth Wood claims that 17,500 
of the machines (there are 25,000 in 
L.A.) are not being properly super- 
vised. H. B. Bischoff, United Servo- 
mation’s Western Chief, disclaimed 
the figures, said they are “completely 
exaggerated.” The vending exec ex- 
plained Operation Alert’s program, 
showed evidence of where 50-60 ma- 
chines were pulled earlier, and in- 
sured everyone that the vendors were 
under close scrutiny. 

The L.A. City Council has asked 
for reports from the policemen, an- 
other expectation of NAMA as long 
ago as two years. One of the Op. 
Alert steps is to have the operator 
orientate the local police to the job 
he is doing to prevent the purchase 
of cigs by teenagers. 

NAMA told the WSJ that it re- 
ceived ‘a flood of orders for decals 
from ops during last few days.” Some 
of the ops are getting their views 
into the press which is good. Munici- 
palities around the country are order- 
ing the removal of cig machines from 
hospitals, police stations, etc. Univer- 
sities are taking them out. 

And while many of these pi’ograms 
will undoubtedly fail, NAMA feels 
that in order to protect the industry, 
it is necessary to repeat all of the 
advice and instruction passed on last 
year. Too many ops are evidently 
“from Missouri” and they have to be 
shown. 


New Products 



COMIC BOOK VENDOR distributed 
by Redd Uist. Co., occupies one sq. 
ft. of space, holds 140 comic books 
which cost 4'/4<f' and vend for 12(j;. 
Completely mechanical. Franchises 
and Distributorships available. Ma- 
chine sale includes arrangements for 
purchase of comic books. Write: Redd 
Dist. Co., 80 Coolidge Hill Rd., Water- 
town, Mass. 


Health School Held 

CHICAGO — A class of 25 Baltimore, 
Md., health officers recently attended 
a special vending sanitation training 
school organized by NAMA in co- 
operation with the Baltimore 
Health Department and the Mary- 
land Automatic Merchandising Coun- 
cil (MAMC). 

Instructors for the one-day course, 
January 24, were NAMA Public 
Health Counsel David E. Hartley, and 
Herbert L. Bent, Benroy Vending 
Co7npany, Inc., Baltimore, chairman 
of the MAMC Public Health Com- 
mittee. 

Last week’s course was the second 
conducted for the Baltimore Health 
Department under NAMA auspices. 
The first course was held in May, 
1963. 

While in Baltimore, Hartley con- 
ferred with officials of the Maryland 
Health Department about a pending 
state-wide vending sanitation regula- 
tion. The regulation is expected to be 
uniform with the U.S. Public Health 
Service Ordinance and Code, which 
NAMA helped to develop. 

Also last week. Hartley met with 
officials of the U.S. Public Health 
Service in Washington, D.C., to dis- 
cuss amendments to the federal vend- 
ing sanitation code. 

Amendments to the code are needed 
in order to bring it up to date and 
to keep pace with vending equipment 
changes, Hartley reported. 


New Lily-Tulip Mgrs. 

NEW YORK — To incorporate the 
added functions of the newly ex- 
panded department of Vending, Feed- 
ing, Theatres and Concessions Prod- 
ucts, Lily-Tulip Cup Corporation has 
established two new managerial posi- 
tions at the national level. 

Bill Carroll is appointed Eastern 
Sales Manager, Vending, Feeding, 
Theatres and Concessions, covering 
the Eastern and Southern Regions. 

Tom Drohan is appointed Western 
Sales Manager, Vending, Feeding, 
Theatres and Concessions, covering 
the Midwestern and Pacific Regions. 

Both will report to William H. 
Seldy, Director of Marketing, Vend- 
ing, Feeding, Theatres and Conces- 
sions Products. 


NAMA Conventiori 
Committee Meets 

CHICAGO — The floor plan for Na- 
tional Automatic Merchandising As- 
sociation’s 1964 Exhibit, “with minor- 
exceptions,” will be the same as for 
last year’s vending show, and con- 
tracts will be mailed to prospective 
exhibitors next month, reports NAMA 
Trade Show Committee Chairman, R. 
R. Saloman, CONEX Division of Illi- 
nois Tool Works, Inc., Des Plaines, 111. 

These and many other advance 
planning details concerned trade show 
committee members during a meeting 
in Chicago, January 16. 


66 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



Roanoke’s Boyle 
A Bank President 

RICHMOND — John W. Boyle a Vice- 
President and Director of Roanoke 
Vending Exchange, Inc. was promoted 
to the Presidency of the Mountain 
Trust Bank, it was announced last 
week. 

Boyle came to Virginia 12 years 
ago after living in New York City 
and earlier, in the southwest. Boyle’s 
directorships read like a who’s who 
of industry. The banker was recently 
profiled in a story in local newspapers. 
Jack Bess heads the Roanoke Vending 
Exchange Inc. and the firm distributes 
the Rowe AC music and vending ma- 
chine line in addition to an extensive 
amusement machine line. 


Harry Drollinger 
Dies At 73 

■ Worked For Capeharf 

DALLAS — Funeral service were held 
on January 24 for Harry Drollinger, 
73, a Cushing, Texas operator with 
many years in the business. 

He suffered a stroke three years 
ago and had been confined to his home 
for most of the time since then. He 
leaves a widow Myrtle, a son, C. 0. 
Drollinger, and one daughter, Mrs. 
William Archer. 

Cash Box received the news from 
coinman J. Fred Barber of Dallas, a 
friend of Drollinger, and one who re- 
members some of the highlights of 
the veteran operator’s past. 

“Harry had the honor of being the 
second salesman ever to sell Wurlitzer 
phonographs. He was employed by 
Homer Capehart who is today a U.S. 
Senator. At the time, Capehart bought 
the Wilcox-Simplex Phonograph from 
the patent owners and then sold 
Simplex to The Wurlitzer Company,’’ 
according to Barber. The result, states 
Barber, was the popular P-10 Phono- 
graph. 

“Wurlitzer and Harry were a com- 
bination for several more years,” re- 
lates Barber, “until Capehart bought 
a factory in Indianapolis and made 
the ‘Packard’ phonograph. He asked 
Harry to join him once again.” Drol- 
linger was Southwestern Sales Repre- 
sentative for ‘Packard’ until the plant 
was sold. 



PART OF THE GERMAN CONTINGENT TO A. T. E. included, left to right, 
Erich Schneider of Hamburg; Mr. Derig, Cologne; J. W. Schmidt, Franken- 
automaten Munich; and Mr. Seppell, Frankenautomaten, Munich. London’s 
A. T. E. drew 3000 to New Royal Horticultural Hall this year (see complete 
story pages 62, 63, 64). Visitors arrived from America, Japan, Australia, 
France, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, 
Rhodesia and Greece. 


Insurance For Illinois Ops 

The trend for unity in 1964 in the coin machine industry is certainly indi- 
cated by the growth and mushrooming of local and regional associations in 
many parts of this country. One of the most remarkable areas of improvement 
in this respect is the Illinois contingent, Illinois Coin Machine Operators’ As- 
sociation (ICMOA), which met in Springfield recently. The sudden inclination 
for operators all over the state to jump on the organization’s bandwagon clearly 
underlines the pressing need for cooperative effort, planning, and the execution 
of these plans. 

This “togetherness” even went far in bringing the state’s tax officials in to 
the meeting to hear the complaints which have been troubling the Illinois 
operators. Now, we learn that the state’s tax dept, wishes to help some in 
easing this painful burden. And, therefore, will meet with a committee ap- 
pointed by ICMOA President Lest Montooth. This is but one of several positive 
examples of organizational strength among the rank and file of coinbiz. 

We strongly urge those areas where this cooperative activity is lacking to 
take heed-and act accordingly. Don’t wait until a surprising “bit” of unfair 
legislation is suddenly foisted on you. Be alert-by getting together with your 
competitors on a regular basis. This may be called togetherness. We call it in- 
surance, and the price is right. 



Houston Happenings 


GIVE 


Our sincerest expressions of sympathy to Strike Rothrock, head of Amuse- 
ment Distributors, for the loss of his father, E. S. Rothrock who passed away 
January twenty third. Mr. Rothrock was retired senior vice president and di- 
rector of Stauffer Chemical Co. and until retirement eleven months ago, head 
of Consolidated Chemical Division, worlds largest producer of commercial 
sulphuric acid. He was internationally known in commercial chemical pro- 
duction and holder of Rice University distinguished service award for de- 
veloping a manufacturing process that led to a $15 million expansion of four 
Gulf Coast Stauffer plants. As of 1959, he had flown over 2 million miles in 
course of his company activities. Mr. Rothrock was member of Methodist 
church, numerous civic and professional organizations and veteran of World 
War One. . . . Well known Jewel Deisch, now well established as manager of 
Record Service Co., a major one stop concern here. Jewel, while really not old 
in years, considers herself an old timer in coinmatics, having spent several 
years each with two major local operating firms. . . . The Bill Williams Distri- 
buting Co. (Wurlitzer) recently acquired distributorship on wholesale basis of 
complete Emerson line. Included, naturally, are Emerson air conditioners, 
radios and all types TV sets. . . . Fringe inducements to drop in at H.A. Franz 
& Co. (Seeburg) for both the trade and free riding business paper writers in- 
clude choice of hot or cold drinks, free from Seeburg vending machines, along 
with toll free telephones where one may call office on business or wife to offer 
up some excuse for running late. . . . John E. Williams, ABC Music, on an ex- 


TO THE MARCH OF DIMES 


FOR SALE 

MILLS & JENNINGS 
FRUIT MACHINES 
Al CONDITION 

With Automatic Jackpots 

CRATED FOR EXPORT 

Send for Prices & Brochures 

TO: CASH BOX 

BOX #166 
29 E. Madison St. 
Chicago 2, III. 


BUY 



TOP EARNINGS 

IN 


EVERY TYPE OF LOCATION 
EVERYWHERE 



ACTIVE’S 

the choice for 


THE LOWEST 
PRICES and 


BEST EQUIPMENT 
ALWAYS 


Exclusive Gottlieb and Rock-Olo Distributor 
for Eastern Penna, So. Jersey and Delo- 
ware. 

Reconditioned Equipment For Export 

ACTIVE Amusement Machines Co. 

666 No. Broad Street, Pliila. 30, Pa. POpIar 9-4495 
1101 Pittston Ave., Scranton 5, Penna. 


OPERATE 

TWO BALLS ON THE PLAYFIELD 
AT THE SAME TIME 

Exclusive Williams Features 

• New Drum Units 

• New Coin Switch 

• New Latchlock Playfield 
• New Larger Cashbox 

(W) 

Electronic Mfg. Corp. 

4242 W. Fillmore St., Chicago 24, III. 


Auto Photo 
Model #9 
Auto Photo 
Model #11 . . 

Cap. Midget 

Movies 

Cap. Panorams . . 

Mills Panorams . 

Kiddie Color 
Cartoons .... 

Phil. Toboggons . 

Ex-Ray Pokers . . 
Bowl-A-Ramas . . 

Bally Bowlers . . . 
Hole-in-One .... 

Pro Golfers .... 

Hair Dryers & 

Chair 

Fun Phone 

Bally Golf Champ 
Basket Ball 

Champ 

Cranes 

Chester Pollard 

Golf 

Chester Pollard 

Football 

Evans 

Bat-A-Score . 

Ex. Hi-Ball 

Cross Country . . . 

Evans Hole 

In One 

Goalee 

Hi-Fly Baseball . 
Harvard Metal 

Typer 

Standard Mstal 

Typer 

Horoscope Vendors 
Ingo Floor Grips 
Jack Rabbit .... 110 

Jet Pilot 195 


fl. model 95 

Foot Vibrator . . . 150 

Shoe-shine 

machine 150 

Lord’s Prayer .... 175 

Motorama 175 

Mid. Red Ball ... 125 

Mills Scales 75 

Watling Scales . . . 110 
Rockola Scales ... 65 

Pro Basketball . . 275 
Pro Hockey ...... 275 

Quarterback ..... 125 

Road Racer 275 

Radiogram FI. 

Model 95 

Space Age 195 

Sidewalk Engineer 110 
Set Shot Basketball 195 
Silver Gloves .... 125 

Trucky 75 

Ten Pins 125 

All Star 125 

Bonus Gun 195 

Spook Gun 250 

C. C. Ray Gun . . . 275 
Carnival Gun ... 125 

Big Top Gun .... 175 
Crusader Gun .... 225 
Gen. Sky Gunner . . 110 
Sportsman Gun . . . 150 
Poo Gun Circus . . 250 
Mid. Shooting 

Gallery 175 

Mid. Bazooka .... 175 

Four Bagger 125 

Mid. Slugger ... 375 

Bally Champion 

Horse 350 

Donald Duck 175 


ARCADE EQUIPMENT 
Write for complete Price Bulletin for all 
types of Music-Arcade Equipment — Guns — ^ 

Kiddie Rides — Flipper Games — Shuffles — 
Bowlers & Vendors — new and used com- 
pletely shopped. 

License Bureau ...$ 95 
... $ 850 Love Meter 


1500 

110 

325 

350 


225 

350 

225 

700 

700 

550 

595 


175 

145 

150 

125 

125 


95 


95 


125 

75 

225 

75 

110 

125 

175 

225 

125 

65 


GLE VELaND coin 


Machine Exchange^rlnc.. 


2029 . Pr6spacl,7’CabU-CI«c^ih, :;^velahdy Ohio / 


tended business trip. . . . Was local coinmatic news when A.F. (Al) Lemke, 
dean of local operators, retired his 1938 Plymouth automobile and started using 


VENDING if MUSIC if AMUSEMENTS 


a late model Oldsmobile in his business. . . . Coinman Billy Rider, with a hobby 
for collecting rare and sometimes valuable coins, did some trading at recent 
three day numismatic exhibition at Rice Hotel, Houston, Texas. . . , Favorable 
reports from nearly every source leads to belief that 1964 will be best business 
year ever in this area. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

1641 N. BROAD ST. 

• 

PITTSBURGH, PA 
1508 FIFTH AVE. 

EXCLUSIVE UNITED MFG. CO. DISTRIBUTOR 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


67 


UJA To Honor Harry Siskind, Operator 


NEW YORK — UJA-Coin Division 
Chairman Emeritus Albert Denver 
accepted a motion passed Wednesday 
evening by the nominating committee 
to have as 1964 Guest Of Honor at 
the annual Victory Dinner, Harry 
Siskind, veteran operator and head 
of Master Automatic Music Company, 
a Brooklyn operating firm. Siskind‘’s 
name is thereby added to a long list 
of outstanding coin machine industry 
personalities following a program 
which began after WW II and has 
continued with the support of the 
industry ever since. 

The Committee stepped outside of 
the industry for the first time last 
year when they named Nassau 
County District Attorney William 
Cahn. This year however, it was the 
decision of the committee to select 
from the industry here a deserving 
member and one who has contributed 
to the cause. Siskind has been a 
relentless supporter and organizer of 
the many drives and dinners held 
here honoring industry leaders. 

The unanimous vote, from which 
distributors present abstained, was 
settled in short order and the results 
were passed on to Siskind who did 
not attend the meeting but did im- 
mediately accept the honor when 
notified on Thursday. 

Plans for the Victory Dinner are 
still tentative. The annual affair has 
developed into a festive occasion over 


MECHANIC 

Shuffles-Alleys 

and Amusement Games 

Experienced. Must be able to read 
schematics. All replies strictly confi- 
dential. Send nome, address, phone, 
with references to: 

BOX 608 

Cosh Box 1780 Broadway New York 19, N.Y. 


SHUFFLE ALLEYS 
«« BALLY 

Official Jumbo 

Deluxe Club 

Lucky Shuffle 

Super Deluxe ABC 


$195.00 

150.00 

125.00 
95.00 


UNITED 

Action 

Crystol [ i 

3 Woy 

Zenith 

6 Star 

Regulation 

Dual . 

Cyclone 

Handicap 


Spoflife 
5frike Ball 

Pro 

6 Game . . 
Red Pin . . 


CHICAGO COIN 


Championship 


$650.00 

550.00 

275.00 

175.00 

95.00 

75.00 
175.00 
175.00 

95.00 


Write 

$695.00 

375.00 

325.00 

195.00 
75.00 


MUSIC 

JAL 

Continental 2-200 . . . ! . 
Continental 2-100 ... 
Continental 1-200 


Seeburg 


WALL BOXES 
SW160 


$925.00 

725.00 

695.00 

575.00 

545.00 


$ 79.50 


MONROE I 


coin machine exchange inc. | 

2423 Payne Are. • Cleveland 14. 0. • superior 1-4600 


the years. Cash Box Phiblisher Joe 
Orleck used the occasion two years 
ago when he was honored, to an- 
nounce his engagement to his wife 
Pauline before a packed Plaza Hotel 
ballroom. Crowds have totaled 500 
at past dinners. Entertainment has 
been a major attraction. Hence the 
necessity for agreement on a top- 
night hotel, possibly on a Saturday 
evening, with a star-studded cast, a 
popular guest speaker, with good 
^od, and all at a reasonable cost. 
The next meeting will be held 
Wednesday, February 12. Notices 
Will be mailed earlier in the week. 

A move will be made to stimulate 
interest from the younger members 
of the industry, following suggestions 
from the floor, in order that an 
orderly transition of leadership even- 
tually take place when present UJA- 
Coin Committee members retire. 


Lowen Automaten 
Shows 5 Phonos 

LONDON — A half-hourly taxi serv- 
ice shuttled visitors across to the 
nearby St. Ermines Hotel where Lo- 
wen Autoniaten of West Germany 
staged their own exhibition. On show 
were their five latest phonographs. 
The Serenade 100 selection is the re- 
sult of extensive experiments and re- 
search based on the criticisms and de- 
sires of the 15,000 buyers of the com- 
pany’s earlier Fanfare boxes from 
which the Serenade has been evolved. 
The Consul 100 selection model, 
housed in antique styled cabinet with 
the Serenade mechanism, specifically 
designed for first class locations such 
as hotels and clubs, was also on show, 
together with its junior partner Mini 
Box model. Modern in style, low in 
price, compact in size, the Mini Box 
is ideally suited to the smaller ex- 
clusive sites. The Console range has 
been produced in order that operators 
may have a tasteful and acceptable 
piece of equipment suitable for site 
owners of high class locations hither- 
to reluctant to install phonographs of 
standard design. Although no longer 
in production Lowen Automaton were 
also showing the Twen and Senator 
60 selection boxes with the Fanfare 
mechanism. A wide range of wall 
machines were exhibited, notably the 
Rotomint and Addi-Mint, specially 
designed to comply with German law 
which requires games of chance to 
have a minimum playing time of 15 
seconds, guaranteed minimum pay-out 
of 65% and to offer all players an 
equal chance. These machines are li- 
censed in Germany for three years 
only. 

Games of skill were presented by 
two wall machines with adjustable 
pay-outs. All machines on show were 
manufactured at the Bingen Rhen 
factory of N.S.M. (sister firm of Lo- 
wen Automaten) and the largest of 
its kind in Europe. Lowen Automaten 
plan to open an office and a spare 
parts store in London in the very 
near future and are now appointing 
distributors in London and through- 
out the United Kingdom. Two ware- 
houses will also be opened, one in 
London and one in Manchester. Pres- 
ident of the company, Herbert Nack 
expressed considerable satisfaction 
with the sales resulting from the com- 
pany’s first showing at Blackpool and 
this week in London. The British op- 
eration will include not only juke 
boxes but also the well-known prod- 
ucts of N.S.M. 


Exclusive Chicago Area 

Distributors for WURLITZER 
PHONOGRAPHS and PARTS 



1750 W. NORTH AVE. 


IHfPORTERS- 

Send for FREiE 
LATEST CATALOG 
64 PAGES — Fully Illustrated 

COIN MACHINE EXCHANGE, INC 


Joe Kline • Cable: "FIRSTCOIN” — Chicaso 
CHICAGO 22, ILLINOIS • DIcken* 2-0500 



The pool table business continues to garner the most attention both at the 
distributor level and of course the operating level of the business. The 6- 
pocket game is also being eyed more and more by the location, especially 
when he arrives at the conclusion that the game is simply serviced by the 
operator who insists on making it appear this way. Thirty-minute service 
calls which end up in a table complete with new top and side rails are not 
the way in which a location owner becomes discoui’aged when he 
thinks about buying his own table. The shuffle alley maze of wires turned the 
location against outright ownership many years ago. The simple replacement 
of worn parts on a pool table could change his thinking along these lines. 
The number of locations buying their own tables is on the increase. If nothing 
is done about it now, there could be trouble ahead. 

Newest entrant into the 6-pocket business, and for the first time with 
serious intent, is All-Tech Industries, the Hialeah, Florida concern. All-Tech 
signed Abe Lipsky last month to handle the pool table line in Southern New 
Jersey. ^Lipsky promptly scheduled a showing of the line at S&S Amusement 
in Tom’s River and the Saturday afternoon showing drew many operators. 
The local association cooperated and most of the members dropped by in spite 
of a rainstorm. Abe has a large order now being processed in Hialeah and 
following this weekend, he should have finalized his long range distributing 
plans. The coinman who has completely recovered from his recent illness had 
planned on flying down to talk with All-Tech distribs, Friday evening, Feb. 7. 
They’ll make a 3x6 model for the NYC market. 

In the meantime, biggest social-charity news of the week was the election 
by the UJA-Coin Machine Committee of Harry Siskind as this year’s Guest 
Of Honor. The head of Master Automatic Music was delighted and accepted 
immediately upon being notified by Chairman Emeritus A1 Denver when he 
was called at home. Irving Holzman was re-elected chairman again this year 
following the naming of Siskind, because of the great job Holzman does each 
year. With a little luck, the Committee will nail down a top-flight hotel, a 
Saturday date, a star-studded cast, and a good ticket price for the Victory 
Dinner, tentatively scheduled for late May. In attendance at the meet were 
Denver, Holzman, Carl Pavesi, Aaron Stemfield, Teddy Blatt, Max Weiss, 
Harold Kaufman, Gil Sonin and Marty Toohey. Runyon’s Lou Wolberg had 
to cancel out last minute plans to attend the meet. His lovely wife Rose was 
installed as Floral Associate Conductress of the Amos Lodge of the Eastern 
Star. The formal affair took place at the Jewish Community Center in Bklyn. 

Sandy Moore is manufacturing a coin-operated horse and is also busy re- 
finishing equipment for American Univend, the outfit that makes the vendors 
for F&F Laboratories. Gabe Forman is reportedly in Japan working on a deal 
for 6-pocket pool tables. . . . Herb Cook, a Cutchogue, L.I. op, in from the 
hinterlands to replenish equipment needs, stops at Runyon’s to see Lou Wol- 
berg and remarks that things are mighty slow in Cutchogue in the winter. 

Joe Munves at the Tampa Fair with the outdoor amusement showfolk. 
Winter meetings are in session and the mood is one of optimism. Mike Munves 
doing a good job on American’s “Electra 11” model. 

Irving Kaye in Chicago for the Sporting Goods show and as usual the 
action on the Kaye tables was fast. Howard keeps the plant moving when 
Irv hits the road, and he tells us that the Eldorado line is meeting sales 
demands. 

Irving Holzman spent the early part of the week looking for Patti Page, 
which is rather pleasant work. (It beats taking in beat-up shuffle alleys in 
trade). 

Sid Greenfield, Musical Distributors top serviceman, busy serving used 
machines taken in trade for the new Wurlitzer 2800 phonos. The Tap-Athon 
unit in Kaufman’s place has been running continuously for four months, 
twenty-four hours each day, and hasn’t had a service call yet. 

Si Redd’s comic book vendor is receiving the biggest play of all the new 
things Redd has going for him. Comic books are big money and while the 
machine and the product are specialized, as compared with music, it is 
definitely a “dry” vend, and the profit is 200% per book. Bob Jones, Redd’s 
right arm, back from the Virgin Islands where he vacationed with his wife 
Ruth. 

Sol Lipkin, American Shuffleboard’s sales topper, back from Cleveland where 
he signed deals with Morris Gisser of Cleveland Coin, and Norman Goldstein 
of Monroe Coin. Both agreements are for the ‘Imperial’ shuffle and the ‘Electra 
II’ 6-pkt. 

Sam Morrison, Musical Moments head, busy rounding up foreign language 
45 rpm’s for some of his international locations. After weeks of searching for 
a Russian record, he found what he wanted at the Continents Bookstore, 21st 
and Fifth Ave. ($1.50 per single). This particular location of Sam’s is a regu- 
lar league of nations, he says, and he keeps ’em happy with all kinds of 
European and Asiatic music. Sam, a prolific story-teller, keeps mum when he 
services the machine here. “I’m afraid a small scale war may break out with 
so many nationalities!” 

The antique show will open in Madison Square Garden Feb. 26-March 5 and 
a Coin-A-Rama will be displayed as a special attraction. Fred Freed, depart- 
ment store exec, and America’s most rabid collector of coin machines and 
industry history, has been asked to stage the exhibit. 400 machines will be 
used. One machine vends photos of shady ladies who vend their wares in 
bordellos (in their own way) and then ask you to buy a photo, you shouldn’t 
forget them. Of course, the ancient Chicken-Lays-An-Egg machine is Fred’s 
pride and joy. See ’em all at the Garden (2/26). 

Myron Sugarman back from a Rome, Italy trip. His dad Barney back from 
Miami. . . . For the benefit of all concerned, we failed to include the Keeney 
line along with the Si Redd distributorships when we wrote a story on Redd’s 
new place up in Watertown, Mass, in an earlier issue (okay Clayton Nemer- 
off?). . . . Members of the NY Automatic Vending Assoc, will hold their an- 
nual outing at the Stevensville Lake Hotel, Swan Lake, N.Y. (May 8-10). 
Nash Gordon, veteran association manager, will help Tiny Weintraub plan the 
outing. He joined NYSAV last month. 

Joe Orleck left So. America, stopped at Mexico City and then decided to 
take it easy in Miami Beach where he will rest up before returning to New 
York with his wife Pauline. ... 

Looks as tho CMA will hold the annual once again in the Catskills and 
during the end of June. . . . Here comes that social season agin! Si Redd 
spent a weekend in New York with his daughter who lives in Jersey, and 
those fine grandchillun. . . . Montreal’s Sam Schwartz in town last week to 
attend the Sports Dinner and visit with friends. ... No official word from 
ASCAP on that Senate bill mentioned elsewhere. . . . Roanoke’s John Boyle 
named President of Mountain Trust Co. in Richmond. . . . and until they in- 
vent rubber type, we will not be in a position to fit any more news into this 
column (squeeze!) 


68 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


Chicago Chatter 



As the first quarter of ’64 progresses coinbiz is shaping up well, according 
to reports from all segments of the industry — manufacturing, distributing and 
operating. The spirited momentum of activity is building up day-by-day. . . . 
Our Joe and Pauline Orleck sent a colorful card our way from South America, 
where they’re taking in the sights and visiting Latin American coinmen. Joe 
sez, everything’s “bueno” down under. . . . Jerry Brenner, formerly of Central 
Ohio Coin Machine Exchange, is recovering nicely after surgery at Garfield 
Park Hospital. . . . How could we overlook mentioning genial Lindy Nardone 
of New York, who was a visitor in Chi during the MOA meets in the Sherman 
House recently. 

There’ll be an important meeting hosted by NAMA on February 13 in the 
LaSalle Hotel. All operators of cigarette machines in this area are strongly 
urged to attend. The hours are from 1:30 p.m. until 4 p.m. This is one of a 
series of meetings being held throughout the country. It is based on the U.S. 
Surgeon General’s report to the nation. 


No sooner did George Hincker return to his office in the huge Rock-Ola Mfg. 
Corp. plant, when Edward G. Doris took off for Canada last week. Prexy Da- 
vid C. Rockola is also out of town. 

After buzzin’ with Mort Secure at Chicago Dynamic Industries last week we 
learned that ChiCoin is enjoying a banner first quarter with all of the firm’s 
coin-operated amusement games. . . . Jack Harper, prexy of Rowe AC Manu- 
facturing; and vice president Fred Poliak jetted to Whippany, New Jersey to 
visit the huge plant there. Meanwhile, Paul Huebsch is back in the Mart of- 
fices after an eastern trip on biz. 

There’s plenty of activity and a big step-up in production at D. Gottlieb & 
Co., since the new “Big Top’’ 2-player pinball amusement game is selling so 
well everywhere, according to Alvin Gottlieb. Other busy bees at the plant are 
Nate Gottlieb and Judd Weinberg. . . . That great big smile on First Coin 
prexy Joe Kline’s face was obviously put there by the continuing excellent 
sales of Wurlitzer “2800” phonos. j 

Fred Granger is just about set with expansion of MOA’s Chicago headquar- , 
ters. Larger quarters will be on the 22nd floor of the same building. Fred is 
hard at work familiarizing himself with MOA business. He, Lou Casola, Harry 
Snodgrass and Clint Pierce are looking forward to a bigger and better MOA 
Convention (in the Sherman House Hotel) this year. , 

There are a lot of happy faces at United Mfg. Co., and the reason is the big I 
push in production and shipping of the all-new “Topper” shuffle alley, “Fu- ! 
tura” big ball bowler, and “Bankpool.” Behind those smiling faces are Herb j 
Oettinger, Bill DeSelm, Ray Riehl, Art Rapacz, Roy Kraehmer, Glenn Johnson, ! 
Johnny Casola and A1 Thoelke. 

Sam Stem prexy of Williams Electronic Mfg Corp., returned to the plant 
from his visit to the A.T.E. Convention in London, England. Jack Mittel tells 
us the production lines are heatin’ the clock to keep rushing Williams’ “Beat i 
The Clock” flipper amusement games out to the world markets. . . . Among the ! 
coinmen in town this past week for the big Sports Show at McCormick Place i 
were Irving Kaye with Bill O’Donnell and Herb Jones. Also Bert Betti, Gil 
Kitt, Bill Weikel and Pat Harris. Among the exhibitors were Irving Kaye Co., 
Bally Mfg., and Fischer Sales & Mfg. Co. Show dates were Feb. 2-5. j 

World Wide’s Harold Schwartz info’s local operators of coffee vending ma- 
chines attended a service school session at the distribs showrooms last Wed- 
nesday, Feb. 5, on “trouble shooting.” The second phase of this service school 
will be held next Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7 p.m., on “Brewer & Sanitation.” Other I 
hosts were Nate Feinstein, Irv Ovitz and Fred Skor. j 

Seeburg distribs are due in town any hour now for a big meeting to become ; 
acquainted with the DuGrenier line. Seeburg execs on hand to greet them are: 
Delbert Coleman, Jack C. Gordon, Bill Adair, Bob Breither, Tom Herrick, Ed 
Clafifey, Stan Jarocki and Bob Dunlap. 

When we chatted with Empire Coin owner Gil Kitt we were advised that the 
local distrib is enjoying excellent sales in local domestic markets and in ex- 
port business. Joe Robbins tells us Bob Rondeau of the Empire branch in Mari- 
nette, Wisconsin; and Dick Flaherty, of Grand Rapids are likewise having a 
sales field day in their territories. 

Clayton Nemeroff, of J. H. Keeney & Co., informs that Art Weinand is still 
touring the European Continent. Keeney’s “Colorama” amusement game is 
selling well in this country, in Europe and in Tokyo. . . . Now that Ed Ruber is 
back in the Wico Corp. plant after a whirlwind trip he’s busy as blazes trying 
to catch up with paper work. While he was away Milt and Morrie Wiczer, and 
Ben Kaye racked up a record sales effort. 

Marvel prexy Ted Rubey is still singing the praises of the “Slugger” counter 
amusement game. Estelle Bye informs production and shipping are up consid- 
erably on Marvel’s electric scoreboards for shuffleboard games. 

We noticed a lot of activity at Midway Mfg. Co.’s Franklin Park factory 
where Midway’s “Winner” is going so well Hank Ross, Marcine “Iggy” Wolver- 
ton. Bob Jonesi and Ruth Sheffield are veddy cheerful these springlike days. . . . 
Eddie Ginsburg and Stan Levin, of Atlas Mfg. Co., advise that Rowe- AMI coin- 
operated “Tropicana” phonographs and Rowe Vending machines are selling 
well this first quarter of the year. It is a fine indication that ’64 will be a big 
year at Atlas Music. . . . National Coin’s Mort Levinson and prexy Joe Schwartz 
are enjoying the heaviest current activity in export sales of good used equip- 
ment. 

We missed Johnny Frantz and Don Congdon, of J. F. Frantz Mfg. Co., at the 
steam baths last week. Johnny sez he’s been so busy keeping the production 
lines rolling with Frantz counter amusement games he’s burning the midnight 
oil at the plant. . . . Another local distrib having a hefty first quarter is Globe 
Dist. Co., where Charles (Jimmy) Johnson and his gal “Friday,” Corinne, are 
greeting the visiting operators. The weather sure helps (now we’ll probably get 
a snowstorm!). 



MIDWAY 


MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

10136 PACIFIC AVENUE, FRANKLIN PARK, ILLINOIS 


ATLAS . . . BEST IN NEW AND RECONDITIONED 

VENDING, MUSIC, GAMES 


SPECIALS! 

BALLY PHONE. Ea 

$89 

5— SEEBURG AP3W100 (New) 

$89 

WALL BOX. Ea 

2— WURLITZER 5250 WALL 
BOX. Ea 

$79 


CIGARET MACHINE SPECIALS! 

$ 90 
$165 
$135 


SEEBURG E-1 Cig. 

Clean, working. Not shopped 

SEEBURG E-2 Cig. 

Clean, working. Not shopped 


CORSAIR ‘‘30's” 

Clean, working. Not shopped 



fi> 


Cash Box— February 15, 1964 






New "Fheetseket Zone 
U moots mfh ' 

^ Sooting Aefion! \ 


NEW! EXCLUSIVE 
"LIFT-OUT" 
SELF-LOCKING 
PLAYFIELD! 


AT YOUR 


HICAGO COIN DISTRIBUTOR! 


y^cft/s fries, /nc. 


172S W. DIVIISIY BiVO 
CHICAGO 14. IlllNOIS - 


THE CASH BOX 

1780 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

Enclosed find my check. 

□ $15 for a full year (52 weeks) subscriprion 

Q S30 for a full year (Airmail in United States) 
n $30 for a full year (outside United Stotes) 

□ $45 for a full year (Airmail outsi-’e U. S.) 

NAME 


FIRM . . . 
ADDRESS 


P'e-ase Check Proper 
C ossification Below 

MY FIRM OPERATES THE 
FOLLOWING EQUIPMENT; 

JUKE BOYES □ 

AMUSEMENT GAMES □ 

CIGARETTES □ 

VENDING MACHINES □ 
OTHER 


CITY ZONE . . . STATE 

Be Sure To Check Business Classifications Above! 


I 


1 


California Clippings 


The surge of business that characterized the close of last year, is continuing 
into the new year, and if business continues as good as_ it was in the month of 
January, it should be another banner year. . . . Mr. William Herleman, execu- 
tive vice president of the Wurlitzer Co., paid a visit to the Los Angeles 
Wurlitzer Factory Branch last week. Mr. Herleman was finishing up a world 
tour during which he visited the various Wurlitzer factory branches through- 
out the world. Due in this week for confabs with local manager, Clayton 
Ballard, is Bob Bear, national sales manager of Wurlitzer, and Gary Sinclair, 
Western regional manager. Bart Bartholomew back fz’om a trip to San Diego, 
where he reported the sales on Tape Athon background music systems were 
exceptionally good. . . . Clayton Ballard enjoying the company of daughter 
Beth, and son Jim, home for a weeks mid-term vacation from college. . . . 
Friends in the business extending sympathy to Bella Stack of California 
Music Co., whose mother passed away last week. Sammy Ricklin reporting the 
special discount sale held during the month of January was a huge success, 
in fact so successful that it is being extended to run through the month of 
February. . . . At the R. F. Jones Co., Don Edwards and seiwice engineer, John 
Hotz calling on operators in the San Diego area. Chuck Klein treated members 
of the Jones Co. sales force to an evening at the Melodyland Theatre last 
Sunday. Chuck’s daughter, Joyce graduated from high school last week. A 
new office employee at Jones is Chris Doyle. . . . Joe Duarte, Duarte Interna- 
tional Sales Co., reporting export business holding up very well generally. 
Mrs. Schreuder office manager at Duarte, on a sad trip to El Paso to attend 
the funeral of her mother. . . . Joe Simon in from Chicago and visiting with 
his brother Jack, at Simon Distributing Co. this week. Frank Mencuri happy 
with business holding up well in both the domestic and export fields. Mr. T. 
M. Tan from the Far East in visiting with George Muraoka. ... At C. A. 
Robinson & Co., Midway’s new Winner arrived and met with immediate ap- 
proval as evidenced by Charlie Robinson’s long distance call to the factory to 
order more. United’s Bank Pool is gaining favor among Southern California 
operators as collections continue to be good and steady. In the meantime, the 
Futura bowling alley is enjoying one of the best sales of all bowlers since 
United’s introduction of the bowling alley over seven years ago. Hank Tronick 
said the huge inventory reduction sale of used equipment is in full gear 
at Robinsons and is proving effective in ‘clearing the decks’ for new equip- 
ment. Catherine Lachat, popular and comely secretary at Robinsons off to 
Las Vegas for a whirlwind weekend. . . . Bill Happel at Amco Music and 
Vending announced the installation of fourteen of the All-Tech new fiber 
glass pool tables in a family billiard club in the Fontana area. Bill said this 
is the first of a series of installations which will be announced soon. Leo 
Simone, Seeburg regional sales calling on operators in the Las Vegas area. 
Rocky Nesselroad reporting much favorable comment on the new blonde model 
Seeburg LP Console. . . . Frank Navarro, large operator in the Mexicali- 
Calexico area, in town and left with a large shipment of used equipment. . . . 
At Leuenhagen’s Record Bar, Ralph Anthony of Merit Distributors was in to 
tell the Solle Sisters about the new Chris Kathy record, “All You Had To Do 
Was Tell Me” on the Monogram label. Also in was Gil Bogos from Hitsville 
with a big new pop and C&W record, “The Big Wheel” by Howard Crockett on 
the Melody label. 




UPPER MID-WEST MUSINGS 


Ray Diedrich will enter the University Hospital Monday, Feb. 3rd for an eye 
operation. Doctors agree that eye operation will help Ray’s eyesight tremen- 
dously. . . . Earl Ackley’s son-in-law Jack is now working at the Post Office at 
Spooner and is helping out Earl when he gets some time off. . . . Stan Woznak, 
Little Falls, in town for the day making the rounds picking up records and 
pai'ts. . . . Cap Kiester, Frontenac, in town for a few hours picking up parts 
and records. . . . The Sandler Distributing Company will show the New Wur- 
litzer 2800 at the Blackhawk Hotel, Davenport, Iowa, Sunday Feb. 2nd and 
at the President Hotel, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday Feb. 4th. Attending the show- 
ing will be Irving Sandler, Warren Sandler and Robert Crosby. ... At the 
M. 0. A. meeting last Jan. 16-18 in Chicago were Norman Gefke, Sioux Falls, 
and John Trucano, Deadwood, So. Dakota. . . . Norman Gefke was appointed 
chairman of the Forum Committee, and John Trucano on the Evaluation Com- 
mittee. . . . Mr. & Mrs. John Trucano after two days in Chicago continued on 
to Miami for a two week vacation. . . . Bob Kovanen, in town for the day pick- 
ing up parts and records. 


Happy Birthday This Week To: 

Jake Friedman, Atlanta, Ga. . . . Aspet L. Varten, N.Y. . . . H. A. Jackson, 
Healdton, Okla. . . . John H. Emick, Lawrence Kans. . . . Donald Parks, 
Hampton, Iowa . . . Harold H. Horton, Houston, Texas. . . . Walter J. Huge- 
back, New Hampton, la. . . . L. F. Dick Harthorn, Seattle, Wash. . . . E. L. 
Hearn, Jr. Glendale, Calif. . . . Leon F. Stone, Erin, Tenn. . . . Wilfred E. 
Benoit, Auburn, Me. . . . Alexander B. Ferber, Bklyn, N.Y. . . . Hirsh de 
LaViez, Washington, D.C. . . . Ben Coven, Chgo., 111. . . . Anthony J. Sanders, 
Det., Mich. . . . E. R. Green, Wausau, Wise. . . . Vincent Crintz, Saginaw, 
Mich. . . . Stanley N. Kolitzoff, Tacoma, Wash. . . . Gilbert N. Taylor, Evans- 
ville, Ind. . . . Bert Lane, Miami, Fla. . . . Carl O. Sears, Ashland, Oregon . . . 
S. D. (Sid) Barrett, Okla. City, Okla. . . . Norman F. Gefke, Sioux Falls, 
S.D. . . . Lou Wolcher, S.F., Calif. . . . Lawrence Elden Paulson, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. . . . Ardella Fegan, Kansas City, Mo. . . . Geo. W. Sammons, Memphis, 
Tenn. . . . Stanley D. Feldman, Bklyn., N.Y. . . . Norman Morton, Pawtucket, 
R.I. . . . Chas. Livingston, Ogdensburg, N.Y. 


70 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


THE NEW 


ROWE AMI TROPICANA 


brings you 

THE DRAMATIC WORLD 
OF BIG-TIME 
ENTERTAINMENT 
IN STEREO-ROUND* 

What’s the most profitable item 
in any location? The music a customer 
buys through this Rowe AMI 
phonograph to entertain himself. Let 
your Rowe AMI distributor tell you 
the whole money-making story. 

^Pat. pending 




PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE TROPICANA, LAS VEGAS 




NEW, POWERFUL POINT-OF-SALE CLOCK 

When you merchandise music, you make the profitable Tropi- 
cana an even greater money-maker. What better time to remind 
customers that it’s time to enjoy music than right now? This 
attention-getting clock is a great merchandiser for the location, 
a powerful business-opener for you. See your Rowe distributor 
for the complete details on this clock promotion. 


GREAT NEW MUSIC-MAKER! 

UNBEATABLE MONEY- 
MAKER! 

• Exciting New Styling 

• Versatile “Three-in-One” 
Programming 

• Exclusive Self-Contained Stereo 

• Dramatic Personalized Location 
Display 

• Top Album Hit Features 

• Color, Motion Salesmanship 

• See it at your Rowe AMI Distributor 



ROWE AC 

MANUFACTURING 

The Merchandise Mart, Chicago 54, Illinois 

Rowe sets the standards in 
vending equipment, bit! changers, music systems 



Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


71 






?i2<» 


Show on Earth K, 

.„.****’>■* 

■Witting- targets 1 

^-^-C top rollover 

Hitting lighted 


center rollover 


center rollover 


■Additional 


★ Double' 


'★PlayboardAutoClamp 
★ Front moulding 7 


★ Stainie; 


£UPPER < 


SKILL GAME 


nN\\I///> 


New “Hard-Cote” 
Finish Extends Playboard 
Life to an All-Time 
High! 


Cwr 11A0.50 N. Ko 


1140-50 N. Kostner Avenue • Chicago, Illinois 60651 

TAat EKtha/ToueA/Oj- Qu/UHtijf 


German Coin industry 
Unites For Common Gain 

LONDON — It was a very great pleas- 
ure to welcome once again to the 
Cash Box stand a regular and popular 
visitor to the A.T.E. Lars K. Skriver 
of Germany. He informed Cash Box 
that as from 31st December 1963 
The Verband der Automatenbetriebe 
e.V. (The German Arcade Owners’ 
Association) has been disbanded ac- 
cording to an agreement with Z.O.A. 
(German Operators’ Association). 
Skriver, ex President of VdA, said 
that all arcade owners, whether pre- 
viously members of the disbanded 
organisation or not, had now been 
invited to join their local branches 

“INSTALL-IT- 

YOURSELF" 

Tape-Athon 


I KEENEY'S 1 

I ALL-NEW J 

COLORAMA 

the DIFFERENT 

2-PLAYER 
FLIPPER GAME! 

See your Distributor 
or contact 

J. H. KEENEY & CO., Inc. 

2600 W. 50th St., Chicago 32, III. 

Phone: HEmlock 4-5500 



LARS K. SKRIVER 


of Z.O.A. The decision has been taken 
with the intention of uniting all forces 
of the German coin machine industry 
in their fight for better conditions. 
Lars K. Skriver, although he has 
retired from all association work will 
continue as President of his own 
company, Gebruider Skriver of Ham- 
burg, Germany, importers, exporters 
and distributors of coin machines and 
arcade owners. 



YOUR GREATEST PROFIT 
OPPORTUNITY for 1 964 
— DELUXE 6-POCKET 
and BUMPER POOL® 
—The Dependable Tables! 

See Your Distributor or Write, 
Complete Selection Parts and Accessories. 


VALLEY SALES CO. 

333 Morton St. Bay City, Michigan 





United Struts First Ciass 
Styie With ‘Topper’ Shuffie 

” Four Reel Scoring Adds Interest 


CHICAGO— C. B. (Bill) DeSelm, 
executive vice president and direc- 
tor of sales of United Manufactur- 
ing Company, this city, advised 
last week that with the' release of 
the all-new “Topper” shuffle alley 
puck bowler this week much con- 
sideration was given to greater at- 
tractiveness, durability and service- 
ability in the highly-styled cabi- 
netry. 

In the area of scoring and play- 
ing features United’s large staff of 
designers and engineers feel that 
they’ve reached the ultimate goal 
in “Topper”. There is a rapid 
flashing lighted panel (“Read-Out” 
panel) on the backglass for advanc- 
ing scoring in flashing sequence. 

There has been much improve- 
ment in the backbox over previous 
shuffle alley models, according to 
DeSelm. It has the big four-reel 
scoring, totalizing into the thou- 
sands for “Dual Flash”, “Flash” 
and “Advance” scoring. And, three- 
reel scoring in standard “Regula- 
tion” and “Regulation Champ” bowl- 
ing games. There is easy-on-the-eyes 
fluorescent lighting in the backbox 
(glass) and the pinhood. 

One other important thing DeSelm 
stressed for the edification of the na- 
tion’s operators is the easy servicing 
in the backbox, because of simple en- 
try, and the almost complete elimina- 
tion of intricate, scrambled wiring and 
mechanisms. 

There are extra wide, simulated 
Formica side-rails, a sturdy stainless 
steel enclosed cash box, and a chrome 
plated coin entry plate at the front of 
the cabinet, where the player’s selec- 
tor buttons (for the game to play) are 
located. 


DeSelm detailed the scoring meth- 
ods in “Topper” shuffle alley bowler, a 
six-player amusement game. He said 
that “Advance” scores as indicated on 
the “Read-Out” lights. The score val- 
ues for a strike or spare increase up 
to the fifth frame. After that all 
strikes score ‘800’ and all spares ‘600’. 
It is a flashy, action-packed bowling 
game. 

In “Dual Flash” the strike and 
spare scores are also indicated by the 
“Read-Out” lights on the backglass. 
The lights stop on the first shot if a 
strike is made. If the opposite is the 
case, then the lights flash for a spare 
score. 

The strike and spare scores are in- 
dicated on the “Read-Out” panel in 
rapid-action “Flash” bowling. The 
lights dramatically stop flashing when 
the pins are struck on the very first 
shot in each frame. “Regulation” is 
played according to ABC standard 
bowling (official) rules. 

“Regulation Champ” scoring is 
identical to regulation bowling. How- 
ever, the object of this game is to 
beat the score which appears on the 
“Read-Out” panel on the backglass, 
throughout the entire bowling game. 
It creates spirited competition, accord- 
ing to DeSelm. 

“Topper” also has the “Easy Strike” 
and “Normal Strike” selector button 
on the panel in front of the playfield. 

DeSelm concluded by urging opera- 
tors to visit their nearest United dis- 
tributor to demonstrate the potential 
in “Topper” shuffle alley bowler. 

It is a companion piece to United’s 
“Bankpool” (billiard-type) shuffle al- 
ley and “Futura” big ball bowling 
alley. 


72 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


COIN MACHINE INVENTORY LISTS— USED EQUIPMENT 

A Compilation of Phonographs and Amusement Machines Actively Traded On Used Coin Machine Markets — New Machines Are Listed Elsewhere in This Section 


MUSIC MACHINES 
AMI 

D40, *51, 40 Sel. 

D^O, ’51, 80 Sel. 

E40, ’53, 40 Sel. 

E-80, ’53, 80 Sel. 

E. 120, ’53, 120 Sel. 

F40, ’54, 40 Sel. 

F^O, ’54, 80 Sel. 

F. 120, ’54, 120 Sel. 

G-80, ’55, 120 Sel. 

G-120, ’55, 120 Sel. 

G-200, ’56, 200 Sel. 

H-120, ’57, 120 Sel. 

H-200. ’57, 200 Sel. 

I-IOOM, ’58, 100 Sel. 

I. 200M, ’58, 200 Sel. 

I-200E, ’58, 200 Sel. 

J. 200K, ’59, 200 Sel. 

J-200M, ’59, 200 Sel. 

J-120, ’59, 120 Sel. 

K-200, ’60, 200 Sel. 

K-120, ’60, 120 Sel. 
Continental ’60, 200 Sel. 
Lyric, ’60, 100 Sel. 
Continental 2, ’61, 200 Sel. 
Continental 2, ’61, 100 Sel. 

ROCK-OLA 

1436, ’52, Fireball, 120 
Sel. 

1436A, ’53, Fireball, 120 
Sel. 

1438, ’54, Comet, 120 Sel. 
1446, ’54, HiFi, 120 Sel. 
1488, ’55, HiFi, 120 Sel. 
1452, ’55, 50 Sel. 

1454, ’56, 120 Sel. 

1455, ’57, 200 Sel. 

1458, ’58, 120 Sel. 

1465, ’58, 200 Sel. 

1475, ’59, 200 Sel. Tempo I 
1468, ’59, 120 Sel. Tempo I 
1485, ’60, 200 Sel. Tempo II 
1478, ’60, 120 Sel. Tempo II 

1495, ’61, 200 Sel. Regis 
1488, ’61, 120 Sel. Regis 

1496, ’62, 120 Sel. Empress 

1497, ’62, 200 Sel. Empress 
1493, ’62, 100 Sel. Princess 

SEEBURG 

MIOOA, ’51, 100 Sel. 

MIOOB, ’51, 100 Sel. 
MIOOBL, ’51, 100 Sel. 

Light Cab 
MIOOC, ’52, 100 Sel. 
HFIOOG, ’53, 100 Sel. 
HFIOOR, ’54, 100 Sel. 

V200, ’55, 200 Sel. 

VL200, ’56, 200 Sel. 
KD200H, ’57, 200 Sel. 

LlOO, ’57, 100 Sel. 

201, ’58, 200 Sel. 

161, ’58, 160 Sel. 

222, ’59, 160 Sel. 

220, ’59, 100 Sel. 

Q-160, ’60, 160 Sel. 

Q-lOO, ’60, 100 Sel. 

AY1005, ’61, 160 Sel. 
AY1005, ’61, 100 Sel. 

DS 160, ’62, 160 Sel. 

DS 100, ’62, 100 Sel. 

WURLITZER 
1250. ’50, 48 Sel., 45 or 
78 RPM 

1400, ’51, 48 Sel., 45 or 
78 RPM 

1450, ’51, 48 Sel., 45 or 
78 RPM 

1500, ’52, 104 Sel., 45 & 

78 Intermix 
1500 A, ’53, 104 Sel., 45 
& 78 Intermix 
1600, ’53, 48 Sel., 45 & 

78 Intermix 
1650, ’53, 38 Sel. 

1650A, ’54, 48 Sel. 

1700, ’54, 104 Sel. 

1800, ’55, 104 Sel. 

1900, ’56, 200 Sel. 

2000, ’56, 200 Sel. 

2100, ’57, 200 Sel. 

2104, ’57, 104 Sel. 

2150, ’57, 200 Sel. 

2200, ’58, 200 Sel. 

2204, ’58, 104 Sel. 

2250, ’58, 200 Sel. 

2300, ’59, 200 Sel. 

2304, ’59, 104 Sel. 

2310, ’59, 100 Sel. 

2400, ’60, 200 Sel. 

2404, ’60, 104 Sel. 

2410, ’60, 100 Sel. 

2500, ’61, 200 Sel. 

2504, ’61, 104 Sel. 

2510, ’61, 100 Sel. 

2600, ’62, 200 Sel. 

2610, ’62, 100 Sel. 

PINGAMES 
BALLY 
Acapulce (5/61) 
Barrel-O-Fun (9/60) 
Barrel-O-Fnn ’61 (4/61) 
Barrel-O'Fon ’62 (11/61) 
Ballerina (6/59) 

Beach Beanty (11/56) 


Beach Time (9/58) 

Beauty Contest (1/60) 

Big Show (9/56) 

Can-Can (10/61) 

Carnival (11/57) 

Carnival Queen (11/58) 
Circus (8/57) 

Circus Queen (2/61) 

County Fair (10/59) 
Crossroads (1/56) 

Cue-Tease 2P (7/63) 
Cypress Gardens (6/58) 
Double Header (7/56) 
Funspot ’62 (11/62) 

Flying Circus 2P (6/61) 
Golden Gate (6/62) 

Key West (12/56) 

Laguna Beach (3/60) 

Lido (2/62) 

Lite- A-Line (2/61) 

Lotta-Fun (9/59) 

Miami Beach (9/54) 

Miss America (2/58) 
Moonshot (3/63) 

Night Club U/56) 

Parade (6/56) 

Queens (Bch., Is., Trop.) 

(3/60) 

Roller Derby (6/60) 

Sea Island (2/59) 
Shoot-A-Line (6/62) 

Show Time (3/57) 

Silver Sails (11/62) 

Sun Valley (7/57) 

Target Roll (1/58) 

3-In-Line 4P (8/63) 
Touchdown (11/60) 

Twist (11/62) 

U.S.A. (8/58) 

CHICAGO COIN 

Sun Valley (8/63) 

GOTTLIEB 

Around Wld. 2P (7/59) 
Atlas 2P (5/59) 

Brite Star 2P (4/58) 

Captain Kidd 2P (7/60) 
Contest 4P (10/58) 

Conti. Cafe 2P (7/57) 

Cover Girl 1-Plyr. (7/62) 
Criss Cross IP (3/58) 

Dneg. Dolls IP (6/60) 

Dbl. Action 2P (1/59) 

Fair Lady (12/56) 

Falstaff 4P (11/57) 

Fashion Show 2P (6/62) 
Flagship (1/57) 

Flipper IP (11/60) 

Flipper Clown (4/62) 
Flipper Cowboy 1-P (10/62) 
Flipper Fair IP (11/61) 
Flpr. Parade (5/61) 

Foto Finish IP (1/61) 
Flying Chariots 2P 

(10/63) 

Gigi IP (12/63) 

Gondolier 2P (8/58) 
Hi-Diver IP (4/59) 

Kewpie Doll IP (10/60) 
Liberty Belle 4P (3/62) 
Ltng. Ball IP (12/59) 
Lite-A-Card 2P (3/60) 
Mademoiselle 2P (11/59) 
Majestic (4/57) 

Melody Lane 2P (9/60) 
Mry-Go-Round 2P (12/60) 
Miss Annabelle IP (8/59) 
Oklahoma 4P (2/61) 
Olympics 1-P (9/62) 

Picnic 2P (10/58) 

Preview 2-P (8/62) 

Qun. of Diam. (6/59) 

Race Time 2P (3/59) 
Rack-A-Ball 2P (12/62) 
Rocket Ship IP (5/58) 

Roto Pool IP (7/58) 

Royal Flush (5/57) 

Seven Seas 2P (1/60) 
Showboat IP (4/61) 

Silver IP (10/57) 

Sittin’ Pretty IP (11/58) 
Slick Chick IP (4/63) 
Spot-A-Card IP (3/60) 

Str. Flush IP (12/57) 
Straight Shooter (2/59) 
Sunset 2-player (11/62) 
Sunshine IP (10/58) 

Spr. Circus 2P (10/57) 

Sweet Hearts IP (9/63) 
Sweet Sioux 4P (9/59) 

Swing Along 2P (7/63) 
Texan 4P (4/60) 

Tropic Isle IP (5/62) 
Universe IP (10/59) 

Wagon Train IP (4/60) 
Whirlwind 2P (2/58) 

Wld. Beauties IP (2/60) 
World (Ihamp IP (8/57) 
KEENEY 
Flash Back 
Old Plantation (2/61) 

Black Dragon 
El Rancho Hacienda 
Rainbow (6/62) 

Go-Cart IP (5/63) 

Poker Face 2P (9/63) 


PINGAMES (contd.) 

WILLIAMS 

Big Daddy IP (9/63) 

Big Deal IP (2/63) 

Black Jack IP (1/60) 
Casino 17P (10/58) 

Club House IP (10/59) 
Coquette (4/62) 
Crossword IP (4/59) 
Darts IP (6/60) 

El Toro 2P (8/63) 

Fiesta 2P (12/59) 

Four Roses IP (12/62) 
Four Star IP (7/58) 

Gay Paree (6/57) 

Gldn. Bells IP (9/59) 
Gldn. Gloves IP (1/60) 
Gusher IP (9/58) 

Jig Saw IP (12/57) 
Jumpin’ Jacks 2P (4/63) 
Jungle IP (9/60) 

Kingpin (9/62) 

Kings IP (8/57) 

Mardi Gras 4P (11/62) 
Merry Widow 4P (10/63) 
Music Man 4P (8/60) 
Naples 2P (9/57) 

Nags IP (3/60) 

Reno IP (10/59) 

Rocket IP (11/59) 
Satellite IP (7/58) 

Sea Wolf IP (7/59) 
Serenade 2P (5/60) 

Skill Pool IP (6/63) 
Space Ship 2P (12/61) 
Starfire (1/57) 
Steeplechase IP (11/57) 
Swing Time IP (5/53) 

10 Strike 2P (1/58) 

3- D IP (11/58) 
Tic-Tac-Toe IP (1/59) 
Tom-Tom 2P (1/63) 

Top Hat (10/58) 

Trade Winds (6/62) 

Turf Champ (8/58) 
Twenty-One IP (2/60) 
Valient 2P (8/62) 
Vagabond (10/62) 

Viking 2P (10/61) 

SHUFFLES— BOWLERS 
BALLY 
Shuffles 

ABC Bowler (7/55) 
Jumbo Bowler (9/55) 
King Pin Bowler (9/55) 
ABC Spr. Del. (9/57) 
All-Star Bowling (12/57) 
All-Star Deluxe (2/58) 
Lucky Shuffle (9/58) 

Star Shuffle (10/58) 

Speed Bowler (11/58) 
Club Bowler (2/59) 

Club Deluxe (5/59) 
Monarch Bowler (11/59) 
Official Jumbo (9/60) 
Jumbo Deluxe (9/60) 

Ball Bowlers 

ABC Bowl. Lane (1/57) 
ABC Tournament (6/57) 
ABC Champion (10/57) 
Strike Bowler (11/57) 
Trophy Bowler (4/58) 
Lucky Alley (8/58) 

Pan American (6/59) 
Challenger (9/59) 

Super Shuffle (12/61) 

Big 7 Shuffle (9/62) 
CHICAGO COIN 
Shuffles 

Triple Strike (2/55) 
Arrow (2/55) 

Cr. Cross Targette (1/55) 
Bonus Score (4/55) 
Hollywood (5/55) 

Blinker (8/55) 
Score-A-Line (9/55) 
Bowling Team (10/55) 
Rocket Shuffle (3/58) 
Explorer Shuffle (6/58) 
ReBound Shuffle (12/58) 
Championship (11/58) 
Double Feature (12/58) 
Red Pin (2/59) 

Bowl Master (8/59) 

4- Game Shuffle (11/59) 
Bull’s Eye Drop Ball 

(12/59) 

6-Game Shuffle (6/60) 
Triple Gold Pin 

Pro (2/61) 

Starlite (5/62) 

Citation (10/62) 

Strike Ball (5/63) 

Ball Bowlers 

Bowling League (2/57) 
Ski Bowl 6 Plyr (11/57) 
Classic (7/57) 

TV Bowling Lg. (11/57) 
Lucky Strike (1/58) 

TV (with rollovers) 
Player’s Choice (9/58) 
Twin Bowler (10/58) 
King Bowler (3/59) 
Queen Bowler (9/59) 
Duke Bowler (8/60) 


Duchess Bowler (8/60) 
Princess (4/61) 

Gold Crown (3/62) 

Royal Crown (8/62) 

Grand Prize (3/63) 
SHUFFLES— BOWLERS 
UNITED 
Shuffles 

Clipper (5/55) 

5th Inning (6/55) 

Capitol (6/55) 

Super Bonus (9/55) 

Deluxe model 
Top Notch (10/55) 
Regulation (11/55) 

6-Star (10/57) 

Midget Bowling (3/58) 
Shooting Stars (4/58) 

Eagle (5/58) 

Atlas (8/58) 

Cyclone (10/58) 

Niagara (11/58) 

Dual (1/59) 

Zenith (6/59) 

Flash (6/59) 

3- Way (9/59) 

4- Way (12/59) 

Big Bonus (2/60) 

Sunny (5/60) 

Sure Fire (10/60) 

Line-Up (1/61) 

5- Way (5/61) 

Avalon (4/62) 

Silver ( 6/62 ) 

Shuffle Baseball (6/62) 
Action (7/62) 

Embassy (9/62) 

Circus Roll-Down (9/62) 
Lancer (11/62) 

Sparky (12/62) 

Caravelle (2/63) 

Crest (4/53) 

Rumpus Targette (5/63) 
Astro (6/63) 

Ultra (8/63) 

Ball Bowlers 

Bowling Alley (11/56) 
Jumbo Bowling (9/57) 
Royal Bowler (12/57) 

Pixie Bowler (8/58) 

Duplex (11/58) 

Simplex (5/59) 

Advance (5/59) 

League (10/59) 

Handicap (11/59) 

Teammate (12/59) 

Falcon (4/60) 

Savoy (5/60) 

Bowl-A-Rama (9/60) 

Tip Top (10/60) 

Dixie (1/61) 

Cameo 

5-Star Bowling (5/61) 
Classic (6/61) 

Alamo (4/62) 

Sahara (7/62) 

Tropic Bowler (9/62) 

Lucky (11/62) 

Cypress (12/62) 

Sabre (2/63) 

Regal (4/63) 

Fury (8/63) 

WILLIAMS 
Ball Bowlers 
Roll-A-Ball (12/56) 

6 Player 

UPRIGHTS 

AB Circus (5/56) 

AB County Fair (3/57) 

AB Circus Wagon 
Wheels (12/58) 

AB Galloping Dominos 
AB Circus Play Ball 
(4/59) 

AB Magic Mirror 
Horoscope (11/59) 

AB Mermaid (3/60) 

Aquati Prod. Squoits (11/57) 
B Jumbo (5/59) 

B Sportsman (6/59) 

B Jamboree (10/60) 

B Super Jumbo (11/60) 

CC Star Rocket (5/59) 

GA Skeet Shoot (1/57) 

GA Super Hunter (6/57) 
GA Double Shot (4/58) 

GA Wild Cat (12/58) 

GA Spr. Wild Cat 
GA Twin Wild Cat (7/59) 
GA Super Wild Cat 
Trail Blazer (12/60) 

Twin Trail Blazer (2/61) 

K Big Tent 
K Spr. Big Tent (6/57) 

K Shawnee (1/59) 

K Big Roundup (3/59) 

K Little Buckeroo (4/59) 

K Del. Big Tent (5/59) 

K Big 3 (5/59) 

K Touchdown (9/59) 

K Big Dipper (10/59) 

K Twin Big Tent 
Criss Cross Diamond 
(1/60) 

K Red Arrow (4/60) 


Sweet Shawnee ’60 
Black Dragon ’60 
K Twin Red Arrow (5/60) 
K Hashback (6/61) 

ARCADE 

ABT 6 Gun Rifle Range 
Air Football 
Air Hockey 
Auto Photo Model 9 
Amer. Shuff. Situation 
(5/61) 

B Undersea Raider 
B Derby Gun (2/60) 

B Bulls Eye Shooting 
Gallery (9/55) 

B Big Inning (5/58) 

B Heavy Hitter (4/59) 

B Ball Park (4/60) 

B Sharpshooter (2/61) 

B Golf Champ (8/58) 

B Bat. Practice (8/59) 

B Skill Roll (B 3/58) 

B Moon Raider (7/59) 

B Target (10/59) 

B Spook Gun (9/58) 

B Skill Parade (1/59) 

B Skill Score (6/60) 

B Skill Derby (10/60) 

B Del. Skill Parade (4/59) 
B Table Hockey (2/63) 

B Spinner (2/63) 

Novelty 

B Bank Ball (1/63) 
Capitol Midget Movies 
CC Bullseye Baseball 
CC Basketball Champ 
CC 4-Player Derby 
C Goalee 
CC Midget Skee 
Super model 
CC Big League (5/55) 

CC Twin Hockey (5/56) 

CC Shoot The Clown 
CC Stm. Shovel (5/56) 

SS Batter Up (4/58) 

CC Criss Cross 
Hockey (10/58) 

CC Croquet (8/58) 

CC Playland Rifle 
Gallery (8/59) 

CC Pony Express (4/60) 

CC Ray Gun (10/60) 

CC Wild West (5/61) 

CC Long Range Rifle 
Gallery (1/62) 

CC All-Star Baseball 
(1/63) 

CC Big Hit (10/62) 

CC Pro Basketball (6/61) 

Ex Gun Patrol 

Ex Jet Gun 

Ex Space Gun 

Ex Pony Express 

Ex Six Shooter 

Ex Shooting Gal. (6/54) 

Ex Star Shtg. Gal. (9/54) 
Ex Sportland Shooting 
Gallery (11/54) 

Ex “500” Shooting 
Gallery (3/55) 

Ex Treasure Cove 
Shooting Gal. (6/55) 

Ex Jungle Hunt (3/57) 

Ex Ringer Ball (11/56) 

Ex Pop Gun (9/57) 

Ge Lucky Seven 
Ge Sky Gunner 
Ge Night Fighter 
Ge 2-Player Basketball 
Ge Rifle Gal. (6/54) 

Ge Big Top Rifle 
Gallery (6/54) 

Super model (12/55) 

Ge Gun Club 
Ge Wild West Gun 
(2/55) 

Ge Sky Rocket Rifle 
Gallery (5/55) 

Ge Championship 
Baseball (9/55) 

Ge Quarterback (10/55) 

Ge Hi Fly Baseball 
(5/56) 

Ge State Fair Rifle Gal. 
(6/56) 

Ge Davy Crockett (10/56) 
Ge Circus Rifle (3/57) 

Ge Motorama (10/57) 

Ge Gypsy Grandma 
(5/57) 

Ge Fun Fair (3/58) 

Ge Space Age Gun 
(6/58) 

Jungle Joe 
Ke Air Raider 
Ke Sub Gun 
Ke Sportland 
DeLuxe model 
Ke Ranger (3/58) 

DeLuxe Model (3/55) 

Ke League Leader (4/58) 
Ke Sportland 
Ke Two-Gun Fun (3/62) 
Mid Red Ball (5/59) 

Mid Joker Ball (11/59) 


(Midway, contd.) 
Midway Bazooka (10/60) 
Midway Shooting 
Gallery (2/60) 

Midway Del. Baseball 
(5/62) 

Mid. Target Gallery 
(7/62) 

Mid. Cam. Tgt. Glry. 

(2/63) 

Mid. Slugger BB (3/63) 
Mid. Rifle Range (6/63) 
Mid. Raceway (10/63) 
Mills Panorama Peck 
(11/54) 

Munves Bike Race (5/58) 
Munv. Sat. Trkr. (5/59) 

Mu Atomic Bomber 
Mu Ace Bomber 
Mu Dr. Mobile 
Mu Fly Saucers 
Muto Lord’s Prayer 
Mu Photo (Pre-War) 

Mu Photo (DeLuxe) 

Mu Silver Gloves 
Mu Sky Fighter 
Muto Voice-O-Graph 
Pre-War Model 
Post-War Model 
Mu K. O. Champ 
Mu Drive Yourself 
Mu Bang-O-Rama (4/57) 
Philadelphia Toboggan 
Skee Alley 
Scientific Pitch ’Em 
Seeburg Bear Gun 
Seeburg Coon Hunt 
Set Shot Basketball 
Southland’s Speedway 
. (6/63) 

Southland Fast Draw ’63 
Telequiz 
Un Jungle Gun 
Un Cam. Gun (10/54) 

Un Bonus Baseball (3/62) 
Un Bonus Gun (1/55) 

Un Star Slugger (7/55) 

Un Spr. Slugger (4/56) 

Un Pirate Gun (10/56) 

Un Yankee BB (3/59) 

Un Sky Raider (10/58) 
Wm. Del. BB (4/53) 

Wm. Major Leaguer 
Wm. Big Lg. BB (2/54) 
Wm. Jet Fighter (10/54) 
Wm. Safari (2/54) 

Wm. Polar Hunt (3/55) 
Wm. Sidewalk Eng (4/55) 
Wm. King of Swat (5/55) 
Wm. 4-Bagger (4/56) 

Wm. Crane (10/56) 

Wm. Penny Clown 
(12/56) 

Wm. 1957 Baseball 
Wm. 10-Strike (12/57) 

Wm. Ten Pins (12/57) 

Wm. Shortstop (4/58) 

Wm. Pinchhitter (4/59) 
Wm. Vanguard (10/58) 
Wm. Hercules (2/59) 

Wm. Crusader (6/59) 

Wm. Titan (8/59) 

Wm. Del. Bat. Champ 
(5/61) 

Wm. Extra Inning (5/62) 
Wm. World Series (5/62) 
Wm. Road Racer (5/62) 
Bally Champion Horse 
Bally Moon Ride 
Wm. Official Baseball 
(4/60) 

Wm. Major League (3/63) 
Wm. Voice-O-Graph 1962 
KIDDIE RIDES 
Bally Champion Horse 
Bally Moon Ride 
Pony Twins 
Bally Space Ship 
Bally Speed Boat 
Bally Tnrvle. Trolley 
Bert Lane Lancer Horse 
Bert Lane Merry-Go- 
Round 

B.L. Miss America Boat 
Bert Lane Fire Engine 
B.L. Whirlybird (3/61) 
B.L. Moon Rocket (3/61) 
Capitol Donald Duck 
Capitol Elsie 
Capitol Palomina Horse 
Capitol See Saw 
Chicago Coin Super Jet 
Chicago Round The 
World Trainer 
Deco Merry-Go-Round 
Deco Space Ranger 
Exhibit Big Broncho 
Exhibit Mustang 
Exhibit Sea Skates 
Exhibit Space Patrol 
Scientific Television 
Scientific Boat Ride 
Texas Merry-Go-Round 
Exhibit Rudolph The 
Reindeer 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


CLASSIFIED AD RATE 20 CENTS PER WORD 

Count every word jncluding oil words (n firm name. Numbers In address count as 
one word. Minimum od accepted $5.00. CASH OR CHECK MUST ACCOMPANY ALL 
ORDERS FOR CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING. If cash or check is not enclosed with order 
your classified ad will be held for foliowins issue pending receipt of your check or cosh. 


NOTICE — $67 Classified Advertisers. (Outside USA add $52 to your present sub- 
scription price). You ore entitled to a ciossified ad of 40 words in each week's issue 
for a period of One Full Year, 52 consecutive weeks. You are allowed to change your 
Classified Ad each week if you so desire. All words over 40 will be billed at the rate 
of 20c per word. Please count words carefully. Be sure your Classified Ad is sent to 
reoch New York publication office by Wednesday, 12 Noon, of preceding week to appear 
in the following week's issue. 

Classified Ads Close WEDNESDAY 

Send all copy to: CASH BOX, 1780 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 


WANT 


WANT — A man who can fix Bowlers, Seeburg 
Juke Boxes and Pin Ball machines. White. 
Good references neat. RANEY Mt^SIC CO. 
—.528 NORTH CARVER. GREENSBURG, 
IND. 


WANT — Used tS rpm records. We pay freight 
& top prices. KING SALES — 1415 WASH- 
INGTON STREET— BOSTON, MASS. 


WANT — 45 rpm records. Please send list for 
quick reply. Masters also purchased. Please 
state what you have. PARAMOUNT REC- 
ORD CO.— IG CHERYL LANE— N. BETH- 
PAGE, L.I. N.Y. (Tel. 516— MY 4-4178) 


WANT — Used 45 rpm records. AH types, as 
they run, right off the route. No sorting or 
picking. We pay freight from anywhere in 
USA. Standing order available for regular 
shippers. JALEN AMUSEMENT CO. INC. — 
1215 S. HOWARD STREET— BALTI- 

MORE, MD. 21230. 


WANT — Late Gottlieb & Williams Pin Games 
also all types of Music Boxes and AMI 20( 
selection Hideaway. CLEVELAND COI^ 
INTERNATIONAL — 2029 PROSPECT 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 


WANT — Records, 45’s and LP's, surplus, re- 
turns. overstock, cut-outs, etc. HARRY 
WARRINER, KNICKERBOCKER MUSIC 
CO. — 453 McLEAN AVE.. YONKERS, N.Y. 
(Tel. GReenleaf 6-7778). 


WANT — Attention: Distributors and record 
shops. There’s Gold on your shelf. Want 45 
rpm records up to 10 years old. Highest 
prices paid anywhere. Up to 43d each— our 
choice. RIG JOHN RECORDS. 687 WASH- 
INGTON ST.. BOSTON. MASS. (Tel. 338- 
7426). 


WANT- — We pay cash as always for; Seeburg; 
Wurlitzer; AMI and Rock-Ola music. Gott- 
lieb Pins; Arcade equipment; Bally Bingos; 
Write or cable: PALMER AT BELIN- 
TRACO— 31 SOMERSTRAAT— ANTWERP 
1. BELGIUM. 


WANT — Surplus 45 rpm records. We buy 
large quantities, on a very steady basis. We 
are the nation’s foremost packager of pro- 
motional priced and packaged phonograph 
record packs. Rank references furnished, we 
are rated in D & B. NATIONAL BAG-0- 
TUNES, INC.. 15 ALABAMA AVENUE. 
ISLAND PARK, L. L. N. Y. (Tel. 516-TU 
9-9300). 


WANT — Seeburg MlOOe. HFIOOR, VL200. 222S, 
AYIGOS, DSIGOS, Wnrl: 1900. 2000, 2100 
2150. 2200, 2250. 2300S. 24flOS, 2500S. 26n0s! 
2700S. Rockola 1448. 1454. 1455. AMI H200E, 
J200ES. Guns. Bowlers. Bingos. Rush offer* 
to VICTOR HUGO — K-ININGIN ASTRID- 
LAAN— 49 MECHELEN. BELGIUM. 


WANT-— New ^records 45 rpm and LP’s ar 
quantity.^ Highest prices paid. AH replii 
confidential and favorable to dj’s, reviewei 
and Mfrg. with surplus inventories. RE< 
ORD SHACK, 274 W. 125th STREET. NE^ 
YORK, N.Y. (Tel. UN 6-1600- area co, 
212 ). 


WANT — Late Bingos, Gott : 2-4 plavers Si 
burg CV2nn. Large Ball-rollover' Bowlei 
T’nshopped. complete, working packed ori 
inn! cartons. We pay CASH in DoIIai 
Prices FOR nearest seaport. MAX I OF 
* CO— MFTR 23. ANTWERP. BELGIUl 
(Tel. 33.81.3.3— cable LOBOMA). 


WANT — Juke Box Operators. For a steai 
year round outlet for your used recorc 
Manufacturers’. For your overruns and su 
plus LP’s & 43s. Call or write. EASTER 
RECORD SALES & DIST. INC., 751 10 
AVE.. N. Y. 19. N. Y. (Tel. Cl 5-9469). 


WANT — Panorams and Panoram parts. United 
Triple Plays Wanted. ADVANCE AUTOMA- 
TIC SALES CO.. 1350 HOWARD ST.. SAN 
FRANCISCO. CALIF (Tel. HEmioch 
1-1750). 


want — W e pay the highest prices for 
Bally Bingos and Gottlieh Pinballg mai 
factored 1938 and up. Interested all bra 
new closeouts. Also areade equipment. Ca 
or write to: HOLL AND-BF.LGIE. EURO 
SPRL. 276 AVENUE LOUISE. BRUSSF 
5. BELGIUM. (Cable address. HOBE 
EUROP-BRUSSELS. 


WANT — Bally Gun Smoke; C. C. Bull’s 1 
Drop Balls with 8000 feature: Midway 1 
Ball; Rock-OIa 1464; Super Jumbo; Kcei 
Black Dragon; Seeburg L-100. CROSS 
DUNHAM & CO.— 350 GREENDALE RO 
—YORK, PA. 


WANT — Music, games, vending. Call. ATLAS 
DISTRIBUTORS. 1024 COMMONWEALTH 
AVE., BOSTON 15, MASS. (Tel. RE 
4-1384). 


WANT — For resale: Seeburg and Wurlitzer 
Phonographs, Games. Send inventory and 
lowest cash prices. HASTINGS DIST. CO. 
INC.— 6100 WEST BLUEMOUND ROAD— 
MILWAUKEE 13, WISC. 


WANT — Any age used 43 RPM records. Tell 
us what you have. We pay all freight from 
anywhere. We pay highest prices. Try us 
and profit. Don't wait! Write os todayl 
MUSIC SERVICE CO.. 424 E. Broad St., 
Richmond 19. Va. 


WANT — Juke Box operators for a steady year 
round outlet for your used records. We pay 
freight. Top prices, manufacturers no quan- 
tity too large. LP’s or 45’s. Call or write. 
BULLDOG DIST. INC.— 33 SPRING ST.— 
LYNN. MASS. (Tcl. 593-3920). 


WANT — Attention Distributors, Operators! We 
pay cash for used juke boxes, all makes of 
pinhalls. shuffles, bowlers, guns, guns, ar- 
cade equipment. Forward list to: IMPERIAL 
COIN MACHINE CO.— 498 ANDERSON 
AVE.— CLIFFSIDE PARK. NEW JERSEY. 


WANT — 45 RPM Records, new or used. No 
quantity too large or small. Highest prices 
paid. Write stating quantitv on hand. TONY 
GALGANO DIST. CO.. 4135 W. ARMITAGE. 
CHICAGO 39, ILL. (Tel. Dickens 2-7060). 


want — Y our used or surplus 45 rpm records, 
also new surplus LP’s. We buy all year 
’round and pay top prices. No lot too large 
or too small. We pay freight. BEACON 
RECORD DIST. INC., 725 BRANCH AVE., 
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (Tel. UNion 1-7500. 
JAckson 1-5121). 


WANT — To buy Keeney Deluxe Red -Arrows; 
Black Dragons: Buckley Track Odds; Sun 
Chiefs: Standard Chiefs: Mills Four Bells 
and similar type machines. SASKATCH- 
EWAN COIN MACHINE CO.— 1025-104th 
STREET— NORTH BATTLEFORD, SASK., 
CANADA. 


WANT — First class service repair man ex- 
perienced in repairing and rebuilding pho- 
nographs. vendors, and amusement games. 
DAN CONNY— 1026 BUFFALO AVE., NI- 
AGARA FALLS, N.Y. (Tel. 285-0582). 


WANT — New 45 rpm records. No quantity too 
large or small. We pay the highest price, 
plus all freight. Also over-run return hit 
records. Contact immediately for quick 
transaction. We pav cash. SUTTON REC- 
ORD CO.— 26 WEST 20th ST.— NEW 
YORK, N.Y. (Tel. CH 2-3250). 


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING SECTION 


FOR SALE 


FOR SALE — Bally Marksman $225; Un. Car- 
nival Rifle $125: Genco Rifle Gallery $100; 
Wm. Kin- Swat $89.50; Genco Hi Fly $50; 
Wurl: II'OO 8195: 1650 $65; Rowe 14 Col. 
Ambassador Cigarette $145; GRECO BROS. 
AMUSE. CO. INC. 1288 BROADWAY— AL- 
BANY, N.Y. (Tel. HObart 5-0228) 


FOR SALE — Registered for export. 10 Red 
Arrows $135 ea.; 6 Trail Blazers $150 ea; 
1 Jamboree $135; Lotta Funs $195; Shoota 
Lines $425; D & L COIN MACHINE CO.— 
BOX 1713— HARRISBURG, PA. (Cable ad- 
dress DALCOIN). 


FOR SALE — Brand new Southland Speedways 
and guaranteed like new Speedways: C C 
Sun Valleys; Bally Fun Phones and Bally 
Spinners. REDD DIST. CO. INC. — 80 
COOLIDGE HILL ROAD— WATERTOWN. 
MASS. 02172 (Tel. 926-2250). 


FOR SALE — 33 1/3 top talent brand new al- 
bums five in a pack @ $2.40 a pack of five. 
57" weighted cue sticks @ $2.75 each in doz. 
lots. 2^/4 inch Belgium Balls @ $19.95 per 
set. Top grade billiard cloth $4.50 per yard, 
by the bolt. We want 6-7-8-ft. used pool 
tables. Write. Home office. MILLER-NEW- 
MARK DIST. CO. — 3767 EAST 28th 
STREET — GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. (Tel. 
949-2030). 


FOR SALE — Specials: Completely recondi- 
tioned: Keeney Old Plantation $175; Star- 
time $195; AMI-F80 $145; F120 $165; See- 
burg V200 $150; lOOG $265; Wurl: 1900 
$195; 2310 $445; 2410-S $495; 1700F $145; 
United Big Bonus Shuffles 8Vi' $295; 
MICKEY ANDERSON AMUSE. CO. — 314 
EAST nth STREET — ERIE PA. (Tel. 
GLendale 2-3207). 


FOR SALE— Bally: Silver Sails $885; Golden 
Gates $770 : Bikinis $550; Cross Country 
$265; 3-In-Line $375; Gott: Gauchos $440 ; 
Oklahomas $355; Liberty Belles $400; Wil- 
liams: Tom Toms $310; Mardi (Iras $440: 
Chicago Coin: Citation Puck Bowlers 
$499.50; Royal Crown Ball Bowler $745; 
Riot Guns $515; Keeney: Black Dragons 
(Triple chute, fruit reels) $950; Wild Arrows 
(fruit reels) $750; Summertime $525; All- 
Tech: Musical Ferris Wheels $400; Indian 
Scouts $375 ; Misc: Capitol projector’s Auto 
Test $495; NEW ORLEANS NOVELTY CO. 
— 1055 DRYADES STREET — NEW OR- 
LEANS. LA. (Tcl. 529-7321). 


FOR SALE — Or trade — C.C. Bulls Eye Drop 
Ball $50; United Handicap Shuffle Alley 
$75: Bally Club Bowler $150; Bally Deluxe 
Club Bowler $175; Bally ABC Shuffle Alley 
$75; United Regulation Shuffle Alley $75; 
United Niagara Shuffle Alley $150; Bally 
Bank Ball $150; Fischer 6 Pocket Pool Table 
$193: Exhibit 6 Pocket Pool Table $175; 
20 Col. Corsair $110; 30 Col. Corsair $115; 
Rowe 2-700. electric $105; 22 Col. National 
Model 222. Make offer: Seeburg MIOOB 
$110; Seeburg MlOOC $125; U-Select-It 
RDS and APD Candy Machines $85; 4 Col. 
Superior Gum Vendors $25; Dan CONNY — 
1026 BUFFALO AVE.— NIAGARA FALLS, 
N.Y. (Tcl. 285-0582). 


FOR SALE — Guns cleaned, reconditioned ready 
for location. Genco Cirrus $125: Williams 
Vanguard $140: Chicago Coin Worlds Fair 
$425: Genco Wild West $125: Williams Her- 
enles $175; Ballv Sharpshooter $225; 
UNITED DISTRIBUTORS INC.— 902 \^ST 
SECOND STREET— WICHITA 3. KANSAS. 


FOR SALE— Embassy S/A $595; Zenith S/A 
$225; Want: United Rumpus; Chi-Coin Ci- 
tation: Wurlitzer Model 5250 W/B — MO- 
HAWK SKILL GAMES CO. 67 SWAGGER- 
TOWN ROAD— SCOTIA 2, N.Y. 12302 


FOR SALE — We have a choice selection of 
late Williams Two Players. Write for prices. 
MID-WEST DIST.. 709 LINWOOD BLVD.— 
KANSAS CITY. MO. 


FOR SALE — Rock-Ola 1493 Princes.s $650; 
AMI L-20n $725 : Cont. 1 $575 : I.vric $475: 
K-lOO $525: W-80 WB $20: WQ-2ho $49.50: 
Wurl; 2300 $400: Seeh : 3WA WB $4''.-5n : 
BIRD MUSIC DIST. INC.— 124-126 POYNTZ 
AVE.— MANHATTAN, KANS. 


FOR SALE — Cig. Machines Corsair 30 $119.50: 
Continental 30 $219.50: Ronte Ready Cor- 
sair $149.50: Continental 30 $219.50: Re- 
conditioned and painted. Apeo Soda Shoppe 
4 D Ice $895: Cola Spa Soda 3 D complete 
$95: AUTOMATIC SELLING ASSOCIA- 
TION— 12 WATERFORD ROAD— ISLAND 
PARK, N.Y. (Tcl. 212— GE 1-3321). 


FOR SALE — 2 Percy non-coin turnstiles, com- 
pletely reconditioned $195 each; MIKE 
MUNVES CORP.— 577 10th AVE.— NEW 
YORK, N.Y. 10036— (Tel. BRyant 9-6677) 


FOR SALE — Counter Games — Whiz Bowlers 
and Zippers new. Penny/Nickcl/Dime. Sam- 
ple orders $29.50 each. WESTERN DIST.— 
1226 S.W. 16th AVE.— PORTLAND, ORE. 
97205. 


FOR SALE: For export — Bally Beach Beaaty, 
Big Show. Broadway. Beauty Contest (new), 
Gott. World Champ, Turf Champ, Midway 
Joker Ball, Bally Bank Balls (new). NOBRO 
NOVELTY. 142 DORE ST., SAN FRAN- 
CISCO. CALIF. MA 1-5438. 


FOR SALE— Bally Shuffles; ABC Super, De- 
luxe, Congress, Whiz and Speed United 
Shuffles; Eagles and Atlas. GLOBE DIST. 
CO. INC., 2330 N. WESTERN AVENUE. 
CHICAGO 47. ILL. 


FOR SALE — 50 recorded songs only $3.00. 
Many great songs by favorite artist, our 
choice. New records, guaranteed. State style 
of music preferred — Pop, R & B or Country. 
Offer good only U.S.A. No C.O.D.’a, 
RHYTHM RECORDS— BOX A— ARCADIA. 
CALIF. 


FOR SALE — Distributors of Bally, Gott: Wil- 
liams, Chicago Coin, etc; Bingos; Novelties; 
Kiddy Rides; Bowlers; Shuffles; Pool Tables; 
Arcade Equipment; Everything that takes a 
coin. Call or write NASTASI DIST. CO. — 
1055 BARONNE ST. NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
(TEL. 523-6386) Quickly. 


FOR SAI.E — Cash for used Mills or Jennings 
slot machines. Machines can be shipped 
legally to Nevada. AH inquiries will be con- 
fidential. Write or call WESTERN NOV- 
ELTY CO.. 1995 DICKERSON ROAD. 
RENO. NEVADA. (Tel FA 3-8546). 


FOR SALE— I new 408 Rock-Ola $1075: 1 
New 404 Rock-Ola $925; I used 404 Rock- 
Ola $850; 1 used AMI Lyric 100 $450 ; 1 
used Seeburg AYIOO $775; 1 used AMI 

J-20M $395; 1 used AMI L-200 $895; I new 
C.C. Grand Prize 16' Bowler $1050; WAL- 
LACE DIST. CO.— P.O. BOX 75— MINERAL 
WELLS. TEXAS. (Tel. FA 5-3600 Area 
Code 817) 


FOR SALE — Have your “Squoits Fun With 
Water” games factory reconditioned. In- 
cludes new scoring arrangement, improved 
pump, repair, refinish cabinet, replace worn 
mechanical parts. New machines made to 
order. Write: — AQUATIC PRODUCTS 
CORP.— 8038 ALVERSTONE AVE.— LOS 
ANGELES. CALIF. (Tel. 645-1980). 


FOR SALE — Pokerino nearly new witn orop 
chute and knock off. Also have some older 
Pokerino games with push chutes. If you 
need parts for your Pokerino we have them. 
Write. JAMES TRAVIS. P.O. BOX 206. 
MILLVILLE. N.J. 


FOR SALE — WE have a limited number of 
Keeney Venus bingos for sale at various 
attractive close out prices. Brand new. If 
any one is interested contact GENERAL 
SALES CO.. LTD.,— IRELAND ISLAND. 
BERMUDA. 


FOR SALE— Bally Challenger B/A 13' $325; 
Bally Lucky S/A $150: Ballv Mystic S'.\ 
$75: United Deluxe Baseball $37",; Bally 
DeLuxe Club Bowler $195; United Super 
Slugger Base $125; United Handicap $95; 
C.C. Red Pin $125: Keenev Ranger Gallery 
$125: United Regul ition $75; Ballv A.B.C. 
$75: AMI W-12n Wall Boxes (9) $25; 

BETSON ENTERPRISES, INC.— 3726 TON- 
NELLE AVENUE— NO. BERGEN, NEW 
JERSEY. 


FOR SALE — Regristered for export: 15 Keen- 
ey’s Red Arrows $150; 1 Gott: Liberty Bell 
$450; Gott: Oklahomas $350; Assortment of 
Bally Bingo machines. Write D & P MUSIC 
—27 EAST PHILADELPHIA STREET— 
YORK— PA. (Tel. 81846). 


FOR SALE — All chrome Wall Boxes, action 
closeout, immediate delivery. Seaburg 125 
3W1, 100 Selection each $15; 100 V3WA. 200 
Selection each $35. We buy. sell or exchange 
any .make or model of Late Phonographs 
and Wall Boxes. Inouiries invited, low- 
est prices. SEACOAST DIST. CIN.. 1200 
NORTH A'VENUE, ELIZABETH 4 N. J 
(Tel. B18-3524-5) 


FOR SALE — U-Embassy $595; Crystals $550; 
A-I Condition. TOLEDO COIN MACH CO 
TOLEDO, OHIO. 


FOR SALE — New kiddie rides Southland 
Traveling Pony: XI 7 Space Ship: Traveling 
Dinosaur: Top locations available, write or 
phene. WESTERN TRAILS AMUSE. CO.— 
132 SHAKER ROAD— EAST LONGMEAD- 
OW, MASS. (Also 3249 N. BROADWAY 
CHICAGO, ILL. (Tel. DI8-2900) 






Board Wax. 24 one-pound cans per , 
$8.50 f.o.b. Dallas. Texas. Sold on mr 
hark guarantee. Disfrihulor for D Gott’ 
ChiCoin. STATE MUSIC DTSTRIBI'TI 
INC., 3100 MAIN ST.. DALLAS. TEX 


74 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 



CLASSIFIED SECTION 


FOR SALE — Export Jennings, Cigarolla; 
Buckley Track Odds ; Bally Miami Beach ; 
Beach Beauty; Seeburg L-lOO; Mills Vest 
Pocket; National 9 Col. Cigarette; Gottlieb 
Kewpie Doli ; others. CROSSE DUNHAM & 
CO., 350 GREENDALE ROAD, YORK, PA. 


FOR SALE — 100,000 new 4S rpm 6 months to 
1 year old, $10 per 100, $95 per 1000. Also 
25,000 EP’s $25 per C: $200 per M; 12" LP’s 
available $100 per C; $950 per M. RAY- 
MAR SALES CO., 170-21 JAMAICA AVE., 
JAMAICA 32, N. Y. (Tel. OLynipia 8-4012). 


FOR SALE — United Jumbo or Royal 16' 
Bowler $75; Bonus 16' $125; Duplex 16’ 
$175; Advance 16' $200; ABC Tournament 
$75; AH are as is, not shopped. Have Guns, 
five balls, drink machines and cigarette 
vendors. Write or call. CENTRAL DIST. 
INC.— 2316 OLIVE ST.— BT. LOUIS 3, MO. 
(Tel. MAL 3511). 


FOR SALE—Shufflle Alleys: United Super 
Bonus $95; Keeney Deluxe Challenge $95; 
United Top Notch $129; Ball Bowlers: Twin 
Bowler $275; T.V. Bowler $150; Classic 
Bowler $150; Strike Bowler $95; All of the 
above mentioned machines have been com- 
pletely shopped and refinished. TRI-STATE 
DIST. CO.— CALLIER SPRING ROAD— 
P.O. BOX 615— ROME, GA. (Tel. 234-7123, 
Area code 404). 


FOR SALE — Attention! We are the trade’s 
largest suppliers of Pool Table supplies — 
slates, cues, balls, cloth, etc. Best quality, 
lowest prices, write or phone for our new 
catalog. EASTERN NOVELTY DISTRIBU- 
TORS. 3726 TONNELE AVE.. NORTH 
BERGEN. N. .1. (Tel. UNion 3-8627). 


FOR SALE — Games & music of all kinds: 
Baseballs $100 up; Pin Games $75 up; S. 
Alleys $50 up: Games $125 up; Bally Horses 
$200 ea; 6 for $1000. Also used Vending 
& Cigarette Machines. Wire, write, or call ! 
GABRIELSON & CO.— 724 MEMORIAL 
DRIVE S.E.— ATLANTA 16. GA (Tel. 525- 
7441). 


FOR SALE — Relays — Switch Assemblies. Low 
cost, high quality, general purpose open 
style made to your specifications. Short run 
our specialty. Also electrical harnesses. 
MARVEL MEG. CO.— 2847 W. FULLER- 
TON AVE.— CHICAGO, ILL. (Tel. DI 
2-2424). 


FOR SALE — Gottlieb Pingames, Bally ShulTles- 
Bowlers, Small Ball Bowlers, United Shuffle- 
Bowlers. CALL. VENDORS EXCHANGE 
INS., 1440 WEST 10th. CLEVELAND 13, 
OHIO (Tel. 861-1443). 


FOR SAI.E — Seebnrg V200's .?150 or five for 
$695 : Wurl: 220) $.34 5: 2510 $64 5; AMI 

H12fl $275: 1 120 $325: .1120 $395; Con- 
tinental 1 200 $195: Continental 11 200 

$695: Bally Spinner an-i Tahl« Hockey, 
make offer: direct overseas sbinment from 
Port of Detroit. MARTIN AND SNYDER 
CO.. 13200 W. WARDEN AVE.. DEAR- 
BORN. MICHIGAN. (Tel. LUzon 2-2300) 


FOR SALE — Gott: 5 balls. Baseball Games. 
Uprights, Rock-Ola Jukeboxes and Seeburg 
100 Wall Boxes. HATGREN DIST. INC.— 
1626 3rd AVE. MOLINE, ILL. 


FOR SALE— All late model United Shuffle 
Alievs and Ball Bowlers Sacrifice. UNITED 
EAST COAST CORP.— 585 TENTH AVE.— 
NEW YORK. N.Y. (Tel. 6-6680) 


FOR SALE — Mills & Jennings Fruit Machines 
all types and models, complete with auto- 
matic JacPots. in top condition. Will pack 
in wood for export. ALMAN ENT.. REN- 
DER WAREHDTTPH. DICKERSON ROAD. 
P.O. ROX 431)0. RENO. NEVADA. 


FOR SALE— Wurl: 1800 $225; Wurl: 2150 
$345; Wurl: 2200 $495; Wurl: 2300 $595; 
Wurl: 2400 $695; Wurl: 2500 $795: NORTH- 
WEST SALES CO. of OREGON,— 1040 S.W. 
2nd AVE.— PORTLAND 4, OREGON. (Tel. 
228-6557). 


FOR SALE — Arcade films for coin operated 
machines. Ra.-^ties, pin-up. burlesque and 
art. Available in 16mm & 8 mm. ACKER- 
MAN ENTERPRISES— P.O. BOX 1334— 
ESCONDIDO. CALIF. 


FOR SALE — United 16' Playtime B.A. $225; 
16' Jumbo B.A. $195: Silver Roll-Down 
$550 ; Super Slugger Baseball $95 ; Shuffle 
Baseball (floor sample) $595; Chicoin : Six 
Game Bowler S.A. $325; 6-Pl. Home Run 
Baseball $95; W’MS. Titan Gun $325; Mid- 
vvay: Deluxe Shooting Gallery $225; Skee- 
Fun $225: CENTRAL OHIO COIN MA- 
CHINE EXCH. INC.— 315 EAST 5th AVE. 
— COLUMBUS 1, OHIO. (Tel. 294-3529). 


MISOELLANEOUS 


MISCELLANEOUS— Settled married man. no 
drifter or drinker, age 36. Will relocate, 14 
years on phono’s, bingos, amusement’s and 
shuffles. Phone collect. Area Code 318 — 
442-2385. (Huey Womach — 60 Mary St. — 
Alexandria, La.) 


MISCELLANEOUS — 30,000 professional com- 
edy lines! Largest laugh library in show 
business. 38 books; over 400.000 copies 
sold! Used by 1,000 d^sc jockeys! Orben’s 
Current Comedy our monthly topical gag 
service features dsejay material each is- 
sue. Free catalog. Write; ORBEN DEE- 
JAY LAUGHS. 35.3fi DANIEL CRESCENT 
—BALDWIN HARBOR, N.Y. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


MANUFACTURERS NEW EQUIPMENT 

CURRENTLY IN PRODUCTION 

Prices shown are list prices f.o.b. factory. Manufacturers have not authorized prices where no price Is shown 


ALL-TECH INDUSTRIES 

Gold Crest ( 31 / 2 x 7 ' 6 Pkt. Table) . . 
Gold Crest (4x8’ 6 Pkt. Table) . . 


AMERICAN SHUFFLEBOARD CORP. 

Electra “6” (6’ 6-pkt. table) 

Electra “7” (7' 6-pkt. table) 

Electra “8” (8' 6-pkt. table) 

Classic “6” (6’ 6-pkt. table) 

Classic “7” (7' 6-pkt. table) 

Classic “8” (8' 6-pkt. table) 

Imperial Shuffleboard (16' to 22') . . 

Imperial Cushion Model (12') 

Bank Shot Model (9') 


AMERICANA BILLIARD CORP. 

Tropicana Bumper Pool 


AUTO PHOTO CO. 

Model 12 Studio $3,245.00 

V -2 Auto-Voice Recorder 


BALLY MFC. CO. 

Deluxe Bally Bowler 16' lengths 
(Jan. 1964) 

Star-Jet Pin (12/63) 

Hootenanny Pin (11/63) 

Bounty (Bingo) (10/63) 

Super 8 Shuffle (4/63) 

Fun-Phone (3/63) 

Bucky Bronco Kiddie Horse $996.00 


T. H. BERGMAN CO. 

Arizon Gun (Live action pellets) 
Nat’l Sales Agents, Duncan Sales Co. 


CHICAGO COIN MACHINE 

Champion Rifle Range (1/64) .... 

Cadillac Ball Bowler 

(1/64) 

Firecracker 2P (12/63) Pin 

Spotlite Shuffle 11/63 

Official Spare Lite (Big Ball) (9/63) 
Riot Gun (6/63) 


EXHIBIT SUPPLY CO. 

Card Vender (Mechanical). Model 
412 “Vacuumatic.” Vends Exhibit’s 

Trading Cards. Capacity: 500 $73.50 

(Including 3,000 FREE cards) 

Card Vender (Mechanical). Model 
X500 (2 push chutes). Vends Ex- 
hibit’s Trading Cards. Capacity: 

1,000 Cards $49.50 

(Including 1,500 FREE Cards) 

Post Card Vender (Electrical). 

Models SV-1 & MSV “Vacuumatic.” 

Vends Standard Scenic Post Cards. 

Capacity: 1,000 Cards $99.50 

(Slug rejector included) 

Plastic Laminator (Mechanical). 

Model 444PV “Vacuumatic.” Vends 
laminating material. Capacity: 

300 $98.50 


FISCHER SALES & MFC. CO. 

Empress 101 (101") 

Empress 92 (92") 

Crown One Hundred (100") 

Crown Ninety (90") 

Crown Eighty Five (86") 

Royal 90 (90") 

Royal 76 (76") 

Crown Fiesta — Reg. Bumper 


J. F. FRANTZ MFC. CO. 

Little T-eager (12/62) 

Double Header (12/62) 

Save Our Business 

U.S. Marshall 5<^ Gun 

Kicker & Catcher 

ABT Challenge Pistol 

ABT Cuesser Scale 

ABT Rifle Sport 

Aristo Scale 


D. GOTTLIEB & CO. 

Big Top 2P (1/64) 


PAUL W. HAWKINS MEG. 


Rodeo Pony $ 845.00 

Ben Hur Chariot 645.00 

Twin Quarterhorse 575.00 

Derby Pony Jr 650.00 

Sam The Clown 395.00 


IRVING KAYE CO., INC. 

Deluxe Eldorado 6 Pkt. Series . . . . 

Mark I, 77x45 

Mark II, 85x47 

Mark 111, 92x52 

Mark IV, 106x58 

Mark V, 113x63 

Deluxe Satellite, 77x46 

Deluxe Klub Pool 

Regular 56x40 

Jumbo 75x43 


I. H. KEENEY & CO. 

Colorama 2P Pin (12/63) 

MARVEL MEG. CO. 

Slugger-Counter Baseball 

(U, hi, 10(f) 

MIDWAY MEG. CO. 

Winner 2P (Novelty) (12/63) .... 

ROCK-OLA MEG. CORP. 

Caravelle (20 Col., 800 Packs) Cigaret 
414S 100 &1. (Capri II) Del. St.-Mon. 

414S With St. Optional 

418 160 Sel. (Rhapsody II) Del. SL-Mon. 
418SA 160 Sel. (Rhapsody II) 

With 7" LP Feature 

1494 100 Sel. Wall Phono 

1628 DeLuxe "Stereo Twins” Spkrs. 

1629 “Stereo Twins, Jr.” Spkrs. .. 

1960 Remote Volume 

Control Unit 

1561 Universal Wall Box 

Bar Bracket 

1578 (160 SeL) Wall Box 

1684 (100 Sel.) Wall Box 


REDD DISTRIBUTING CO, 

Cinch Instant Shine Vendor 

(Vendor and packaged Cinch product) 
Giepen Coffee Vendor (Natl, Agents) 
Vend-A-Book Comic Book Vendor 


ROCK-OLA IVI CORP. 

Model TRLB-M — Coffee, Hoi Chocolate, Soup 
Vendor — Batch fresh brew, modulator door 
and light, 600 cup capacity, coffee 4 ways, 
extra cream and sugar, whipped powdered 
chocolate, liquid sugar, liquid soup, fresh 
cream, with changer. 

Model 1403-S — Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Soup — 
Single cup fresh brew. 600 cup capacity. 
Coffee 4 ways, extra cream and sugar, 
with sugar and cream buttons a standard 
feature. (Extra strong coffee button kit. 
Model 2017, available for Model 1403-S. 
Also available as Model 1403 without hot 
whipped soup feature). 

Model 1200 — Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Soup — 
single cup fresh brew. 600 cup capacity. 
Coffee 4 ways, extra cream and sugar 
butpjns are standard. 

Model 3402 — Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Soup and 
Tea — (Compact Model). Single cup, fresh 
brew, serves coffee and tea 4 ways. 

Model 3403 — as above, without 4 way tea 
feature. 


ROWE AC SERVICES 

Rowe-AMT L-200 Phonograph with Automix, 
Stereo-Round (Plays 33-1/3-45 stereo or 
monaural records, intermixed.) Has three- 
in-one convertibility 200 selections, 160 
selections, or 100 selections. 

HAC-200 Hideaway, 200 Sel. Sel. Mon. 
HEB-200 Hideaway, 200 Sel. Selective Stereo 
CDA Stepper, CDD Stepper, WQ-100 100 
Sel. W.B., WQ-luO 100 Sel. W.B., WQ-120 
120 Sel. W.B., WQ-200 200 Sel. W.B., 
WQ-20U-1 200 Sel. W.B., Dual Price Play, 
WQ-200-3 200 Sel. W.B., Dual Price Play, 
4-coin Rejector. 

F-10436 Bar Grip, W.B. Mounting Bracket 

EX-600 Cylindrical Wall Speaker 

EX-700 Wall Speaker 

L-2130 Ceiling Spkr., Choice of Grille 

Types Listed: L-2136 Random Pattern, 
L-2136 Uniform Pattern, L-2606 Circular 
Flush-Mount Grille 
Riviera Cigarette, 20 sel. 800 pack. 

Celebrity Cigarette Merchandiser, 14 selec- 
tion, 610 pack capacity, modular line. 
Celebrity Candy Merchandiser. 11 selections, 
360 capacity, modular. 

77 Candy Merchandiser, 11 sel, 360 cap. 
Tasty 20 Candy Merchandiser, 20 sel, 660 cap 
Celebrity Pastry Merchandiser, 6 selection. 

100 capacity, modular. 

Celebrity Hot Food Merchandiser, 7 selection, 
140 capacity, modular. 

Celebrity All Purpose Merchandiser, 130 ca- 
pacity, 130 selection, modular. 

Celebrity Fresh Brew Coffee Merchandiser. 

11 selection, 760 cup capacity, modular. 
Celebrity Cold Drink Merchandiser, 4 selec- 
tion, 1000 cup capacity, crushed ice feature 
optional, modular. 

Dollar Bill Changer, 10 change combinations. 

up to $300 bank capacity. 

Celebrity Condiment unit, accommodating 
oven, can opener, ketchup, mustard, salt, 
pepper, etc., modular. 

Customic Background Music (Tape Car- 
tridge) 


THE SEEBURG CORP. 

LPC-1 — Stereo LP Console, 160 Selection 
Phono. 

LPC-IR — Stereo LP Console, i60 Selection 
Phono., remote control. 

All LP Consoles have the following stand- 
ard equipment: Personalized, Album uf 
the Month Feature, Plays 33-1/3 and 46 
RPM records intermixed. Album Pricing 
and universal pricing system. Half Dollar. 
Income Totalizer. 


HLPC-1— Stereo LP, 160 Selection, Hide- 
away Plays 33-1/3 and 46 RPM records 
intermixed, Album pricing and universal 
pricing system. Income totalizer. 
DS160H— Directional Stereo, 160 Selection 
Phono. With Artist of the Week Feature, 
Universal Pricing, Plays 33-1/3 and 46 
RPM records intennixed. Half Dollar, Re- 
mote Control optional. 

SC-1 — Stereo Consolette, 160 Selection 

Includes the following features : Person- 
alized, Album of the Month, Album and 
single pricing. Pushbutton volume control. 
Remote selection. Twin stereo speakers 
Remote income totalizer. 

3W100— Wall-O-Matic 100, Single Pricing 
TWl — Twin stereo wall speaker, 8 inch 
TCI — Twin stereo comer speakers, 8 meh 
TRl — Twin stereo recessed speakers, 8 inch 
EBWCl-12 — Extended bass comer/wall 
speaker, 12 inch 

PRVC-2 — Powered remote volume control 
CC-2 — Coin counter 
BACKGROUND MUSIC 
Encore I 750 Sel. 

BMS-2 — Background Music unit, 1000 sel. 
BMC-1 — Background Music Compact 
BMCA-1 — Companion Audio 
CIGARETTE VENDOR 
4E3 — Modular unit, 826 pack capacilr. 
4E3XM — Modular (less match unit) 8z5 pack 
capacity. 

4E4 — Free Standing, Personalized, 825 pack 
capacity. 

4E4XM — Free Standing, Personalized (less 
match unit) 825 pack capacity 
COFFEE VENDOR 

6g2-(^ — Seeburg/Bally Coffee vendor hrewi 
coffee cup at a time, Coffee-Chocolate (dry 
ingredients) 200 7 oz. cups. Selective: 6 
664 _D — Seeburg/Bally Modular Coffee Ven- 
dor, Coffee-Chocolate (dry ingredients) 
450 7 oz. cups. Selective: 6 
664-DS — Seeburg/Bally Modular Coffee Ven- 
dor, Coffee-Chocolate-Soup or Tea^ (dry 
ingredients) 460 7 oz. cups. Selective: 6 
664-R — Seeburg/Bally Modular Coffee Ve|i- 
dor, (joffee-Chocolate (refrigerated creatri) 
450 7 oz. cups. Selective: 6 
767 — Seeburg/Bally Coffee Vendor — Fits any 
in-line modular installation, Coffee-Choco- 
late-Soup or Tea (dry ingredients) 660 
cup capacity. Selective ! 6 


SOUTHLAND ENGINEERING CORP. 

Time Trials (9/63) 

Traveling Frog 

Orbiting Gemini Ride 

Traveling Dinosaur 

Space Ship 

'Travel Pony (Adaptable to Other 
Rides) 


UNITED MFC. CORP. 


Futura Bowling Alley (12/63) . — 

Bank Pool (11/63) 

Skippy Shuffle (11/63) 

Jill-Jill (N.Y.C. Version of Skippy Shuffle) 


U.S. BILLIARDS INC. 

Comet 6-Pkt. Series 

Model 6700 

Model 7700 . . 

Model 8200 

Model 9100 . . . . 

Deluxe Rotation Bumper 

Model 48 ... 

Model 67 


VALLEY SALES CO. 

Deluxe 6-Pocket Models 
Model 760A— 75x42x31 
Model 850A— 84x47x31 
Model 900A— 90x50x31 
Special 6-Pocket Model 
Model 745A— 76x42x31 
Regulation Bumper Pool 


WILLIAMS MEG. CO. 

Beat The Clock IP (12/63) 


THE WURLITZER COMPANY’ 

2700 Stereo-Mono., 200-sel. phono. 

2710 Stereo-Mono., 100-sel. phono. 

Wall Boxes 

6121 Private Stereo Spkr. for use on WB 
5200 and WB 6250 with Models 2300 thru 
2700 

6010 WB Ten Top Tunes sel. 60^ 

5250 WB 200-sel. 10-26-50d 
5207 WB 104-sel. 

5200 WB 100-sel. 10-26-60^ 

Speakers 

5122 Stereo Convertible Console Spkr. 

5123 Stereo Wall Spkr — 12" Coaxial 

5124 Stereo Corner Spkr. — 8" Extended 
Range 

5125 Stereo Extender Spkr. (Packed in 
Pairs) 

5126 Stereo Directional Spkr. (Packed in 
Pairs) 

Hideaway Phonographs 
2717 Stereo-Mono. 200-sel. 

2711 Stereo-Mono. 100-sel. 


75 



You’re Looking at the Only Phonograph 


Offering the Extra Earning Power of the 


Ten Top Tunes Plus Album Music Selections 


APPEALS TO BOTH YOUNG AND OLD 



THE WURLITZER COMPANY • 108 Years of Musical Experience • NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y. 


Cash Box — February 15, 1964 


76 






FLASH 




CM*!«P 


FLUORESCENT 

LIGHTING 


1 TO 6 CAN PLAY 


'PCec^ 

EASY STRIKE 

OR 

NORMAL STRIKE 


Designed by the 
ORIGINATOR 
of Coin-Operated 

SHUFFLE ALLEYS 

and 

BOWLING ALLEYS 


standard 10^ Play 

MULTIPLE 
COIN MECHANISM 

(OPTIONAL AT EXTRA COST) 


RUGGED 
Pilfer- Proof 
CONSTRUCTION 


EASY 

TO 

SERVICE 


See United’s Fabulous New 


NOW AT 
YOUR 

DISTRIBUTOR 


81/2 FT. LONG 

2'/2 FT. WIDE 

SHIPPING 

WEIGHT 

(CRATED) 

465 lbs. 


HIGHEST 
RESALE VALUE 


FROM YOUR 

UNIJEO OISJRIBUTOR TOPAY/ 


UNITED OPERATORS ARE SUCCESSFUL OPERATORS 


UNITED MANUFACTURING COMPANY . 3401 NORTH CALIFORNIA AVE., CHICAGO 18, ILLINOIS • CABLE ADDRESS: UMCO 



99 


"You do the damdest things, baby... 



Remember that one? Or how about “Stompin’ at the Savoy,’’ or 
“Pennies from Heaven’’. . . top tunes from back in 1936. 

The year we introduced one of our “big hits,’’ too . . . the Rock-Ola 
Multi-Selector. “America’s finest phonograph ... at America’s 
lowest price.’’ And here’s what we said about it then . . . 

“. . . just two tools. An ordinary pair of pliers and a tiny, dime store 
screw driver. That’s about all you need to keep your Rock-Ola 
Multi-Selector in perfect running order 24 hours a day throughout 
the year. This is because the Rock-Ola Multi-Selector is so well 
built. So solidly constructed. Its entire assembly is a masterpiece of 
simplicity. All useless parts— all excess grief and baggage — have 
been done away with. Only the necessary elements remain. 

That’s why you can always depend on your Rock-Ola Multi-Selector 
to perform smoothly, and satisfactorily.’’ 

Years pass. Fads change. So do people, products, and even entire 
companies. Yet, for us one thing has never changed. Outlined in 
that brief passage is our philosophy of manufacturing which has 
remained the same for nearly 30 years. Pure and simple concepts 
of engineering ... a tradition of excellence which has made 
Rock-Ola the most respected name in phonographs ... a tradition 
well-represented by our new 1964 Rhapsody II and Capri II 
De Luxe Stereo-Monaural phonographs. 

See them at your Rock-Ola Distributor’s today!